READINGS  IN  EARLY  MORMON  HISTORY
(Newspapers of Pennsylvania)


Misc. Pennsylvania Newspapers
1844-1849 Articles


Pittsburgh after the Great Fire of 1845


1810-19   |   1820-39   |   1840-42   |   1842-43   |   1844-49   |   1850-99   |   1900-99



1844 (Jan-Jun)
Pst Jan 03 '44  |   Pst Jan 29 '44  |   GL Feb '44  |   Pst Feb 01 '44  |   Pst Feb 07 '44  |   TEag Feb 21 '44
Pst Feb 26 '44  |   Pst Mar 06 '44  |   Pst Mar 07 '44  |   Pst Mar 24 '44  |   Pst Apr 02 '44  |   Pst Apr 06 '44
SoA May 02 '44  |   Pst May 03 '44  |   Pst May 06 '44  |   Pst May 20 '44  |   Evan Jun 04 '44  |   BArg Jun 06 '44
Pst Jun 07 '44  |   Pst Jun 08 '44  |   POrg Jun 15 '44  |   Pst Jun 15 '44  |   Pst Jun 17 '44  |   Pst Jun 22 '44
POrg Jun 29 '44
1844 (Jul-Dec)
CAdv Jul 03 '44  |   TEag Jul 03 '44  |   Pst Jul 08 '44  |   Pst Jul 09 '44  |   CAdv Jul 10 '44  |   BArg Jul 10 '44
POrg Jul 12 '44  |   BArg Jul 17 '44  |   TEag Jul 24 '44  |   Pst Aug 29 '44  |   Pst Sep 05 '44  |   Pst Sep 19 '44
PrU Sep 25 '44  |   SAmr Sep 28 '44  |   Pst Sep 30 '44  |   BArg Oct 02 '44  |   PitGz Oct 03 '44  |   PitGz Oct 08 '44
PitGz Oct 10 '44  |   SAge Oct 10 '44  |   PitGz Oct 11 '44  |   PitGz Oct 15 '44  |   WRep Oct 19 '44  |   TEag Oct 30 '44
WRep Oct 30 '44  |   PrU Nov 06 '44  |   PitGz Nov 07 '44  |   Pst Nov 12 '44  |   PitGz Nov 13 '44  |   PitGz Nov 14 '44
WRep Nov 16 '44  |   PrU Nov 20 '44  |   WRep Nov 23 '44  |   PrU Dec 04 '44  |   PitGz Dec 31 '44
1845-1849
PitGz Jan 08 '45  |   PrU Jan 08 '45  |   PrU Jan 15 '45  |   PitGz Jan 27 '45  |   PrU Feb 12 '45  |   PitGz Mar 05 '45
PitGz Mar 20 '45  |   PitGz Mar 26 '45  |   PrU Mar 26 '45  |   PrU Apr 11 '45  |   PitGz Apr 22 '45  |   PitGz May 05 '45
PitGz May 07 '45  |   PitGz May 08 '45  |   PitGz Jun 03 '45  |   PitGz Jun 04 '45  |   PrU Jun 04 '45  |   PitGz Jun 09 '45
PitGz Jun 10 '45  |   PrU Jun 11 '45  |   PitGz Jun 13 '45  |   PitGz Jun 19 '45  |   PitGz Jun 20 '45  |   PitGz Jun 24 '45
PitGz Jul 07 '45  |   PitGz Jul 09 '45  |   PitGz Jul 16 '45  |   PrU Jul 16 '45  |   TEag Jul 30 '45  |   PitGz Sep 23 '45
PitGz Sep 25 '45  |   PitGz Sep 29 '45  |   PitGz Sep 30 '45  |   PCJ Sep ?? '45  |   PrU Oct 01 '45  |   Chr Oct 01 '45
PitGz Oct 03 '45  |   PitGz Oct 07 '45  |   PitGz Oct 11 '45  |   PitGz Oct 15 '45  |   Chr Oct 15 '45  |   PrU Oct 22 '45
SAge Oct 25 '45  |   PrU Nov 05 '45  |   LanEx Nov 05 '45  |   PrU Nov 19 '45  |   PrU Nov 25 '45  |   PitGz Dec 01 '45
PitGz Dec 06 '45  |   PitGz Dec 13 '45  |   PrU Dec 17 '45  |   PitGz Dec 31 '45  |   Chr Jan 28 '46  |   PitGz Feb 28 '46
WRep Mar 14 '46  |   PitGz May 14 '46  |   WRep May 22 '47  |   DemB Jan 08 '48  |   CDol Jul 25 '49


Articles Index   |   Rigdon's Messenger & Advocate   |   Philadelphia Newspapers

 


Vol. II. - No. 93.                     Pittsburgh,  January 3, 1844.                     Two Cents.


 

KIDNAPPING MORMONS. -- Information from Nauvoo gives us to understand that two Mormons have been kisnapped from that place can carried to Missouri. The Governor of Illinois has been called upon to demand the men of the Governor of Missouri, but he refused to do so. This is a gross outrage upon those people, the mass of whom are good citizens and obey the laws, whatever may be said of their leaders. We have seen no reasons for the Governor's refusal to make the demand, but presume it will be forthcoming.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 115.                     Pittsburgh,  January 29, 1844.                     Two Cents.


 

An ordinance has been passed at Nauvoo, Illinois, declaring that any person or persons from Missouri who may come to that city to arrest Joe Smith or any one of his confederates, for crimes alleged to have been committed in the last named State, shall on conviction, be liable to imprisonment for life, and can only be pardoned by the Governor, of Illinois, with the consent of the Mayor of the city!!


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                                  Pittsburgh,  February, 1844.                                 No. 2.


 

==> Having resided in Pittsburgh from the eighth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, until the eighth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, we had a sufficient opportunity to make ourself acquainted with all the particulars concerning one Mr. Solomon Spaulding, of whom it is said, that he wrote a romance, from which it is asserted, originated the Book of Mormon. We have duly examined the whole matter, and exposed the story to the righteous contempt of a candid public, in a pamphlet, entitled "The Spaulding Story."

Price ten cents per single copy, or six dollars per hundred.


Note 1: LDS Apostle John E. Page published the first issue of The Gospel Light at Pittsburgh in June 1843. It is likely that his "Spaulding Story" pamphlet was issued from the same press in Pittsburgh in that same month. The Feb. 1844 issue of The Gospel Light, advertising that 1843 pamphlet, may have been printed in Philadelphia, however. The final issue of the paper was published at Pittsburgh in the latter part of May, 1844. The Gospel Light was replaced in June of 1844 by the larger-sized People's Organ, a paper that lasted only three issues.

Note 2: John E. Page's series of articles written in Pennsylvania in defence of Mormonism began with his May 28, 1842 letter to the Pittsburgh Morning Chronicle. Page did not specifically address the Solomon Spalding authorship claims until he published an article in the Chronicle on July 2, 1842. The Apostle continued his attack on the Spalding claims with three more articles, published in the same paper on July 4th, July 8th, and July 12th. The last two of these articles merely reproduced pp. 5-8 and pp. 11-12 of Elder Benjamin Winchester's Origin of the Spaulding Story. It must have occurred to Page, during the summer of 1842, that Winchester's 1840 pamphlet was an inadequate defence against local charges saying that Sidney Rigdon had once obtained a Spalding manuscript in Pittsburgh and later turned that story into the Book of Mormon. By mid-1843 Page had completed his own anti-Spalding pamphlet, drawing new material from G. J. Adams' 1841 Plain Facts shewing the origin of the Spaulding Story and from his own investigations in and around Pittsburgh.

Note 3: Although John E. Page reportedly interviewed the Rev. Robert Patterson, Sr. prior to publishing his 1843 attack on the Spalding claims, the Apostle makes no use of any facts obtained from that interview in his pamphlet. Rather, he prints statements taken from local Mormons Carvil Rigdon (Sidney's brother) and Peter Boyer (Sidney's brother-in-law) dated Jan. 27, 1843. Elder William Small dates Page's unpublished interview with Patterson to about the year 1841, but the Page-Patterson encounter more than likely occurred a few months after the publication of Rev. Samuel Williams' Mormonism Exposed at Pittsburgh on May 4, 1842.


 



Vol. II. - No. 118.                   Pittsburgh,  February 1, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

==> The Mormons, through Jo Smith, have addressed a letter to J. C. Calhoun, and because he declines promising to do the world and all for them, have repudiated the idea of voting for him, if he be nominated to the Presidency.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 123.                   Pittsburgh, Feb. 7, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

The Mormons and those residing in the neighborhood of Nauvoo, are assuming a belligerent position towards each other. The Mormon Magistrates were resisted a few days ago by Mr. Milton Cook, and the posse kept at bay for two days; at the expiration of which time, the posse retired.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TIOGA  [   ]  EAGLE.

Vol. VI.                        Wellsborough, Pa., Wednesday, February 21, 1844.                           No. ?



Correspondence of the "Tioga Eagle."

HARRISBURG, Feb. 14, 1844.          
SIR: -- Nothing of much importance to your section of the State transpired in the Legislature during the past week. On the 10th inst., Mr. Wilcox, of McKean, presented a memorial to the Senate, of Sidney Rigdon, a "member of Latter Day Saints," or of the tribe of Joe Smith.

Mr. W. moved the reading of the memorial, which was agreed to -- but before the Clerk had concluded, a motion to suspend its further reading was mad; not carried, Yeas 12, Nays 15, the Clerk continued. This memorial sets forth at great length the "diaboical outrages" inflicted upon the Latter Day Saints, by the people of Missouri, and asking the Legislature to instruct the Representatives of this State in Congress to procure the passage of a law which shall fully remunerate them forthe loss of property sustained in consequence of the "persecution which they met with at the hands of the 'Gentiles.'"

The following is the concluding portion of this unique memorial:
"In confidence of the purity and patriotism of the Representatives of the people of his native state, (Pennsylvania,) your memorialist comes to your honorable body, through this his winged messenger, to tell you that the altar which was erected by the blood of your ancestors, to civil and religious liberty, from whence ascended up the holy incense of pure patriotism and universal good will to man, into the presence of Jehovah, a savor of life, is thrown down and the worshipers thereat, have been driven away, or else they are laying slain at the foot of the altar.

"He comes to tell your honorable body, that the blood of the heroes and patriots of the revolution, who have been slain by wicked hands (for enjoying their religious rights, the boon of Heaven to man,) has cried, and is crying in the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth, saying, 'redress! -- redress our wrongs, O Lord God of the whole Earth!

"He comes to tell your honorable body, that the dying groans of infant innocence, and the shrieks of insulted and abused females -- many of them widows of revolutionary patriots, have ascended up into the ears of Omnipotence, and are registered in the archives of Eternity, to be had in the day of retribution, as a testimony against the whole nation -- unless their cries and groans are heard by the Representatives of the people, and ample redress made, as far as the nation can make it -- or else the wrath of the Almighty will come down in fury against the whole Nation.

"Under all these circumstances, your memorialist prays to be heard by your honorable body, touching all the matters of his memorial; and as a memorial will this session be presented to Congress, praying for a redress of our grievances, he prays your honorable body will instruct the whole delegation of Pennsylvania, in both Houses, to use all their influence in the national counsels, to have redress granted."

Note: See the Nauvoo Times & Seasons of Feb. 1, 1844 for the full text of Sidney Rigdon's "memorial."


 



Vol. II. - No. 139.                   Pittsburgh, Feb. 26, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

THE MORMONS. -- The Quincy Herald of the 9th inst., contains the following item of a bellicose character. From the recent difficulties with the Mormons, we should not be surprised at a serious outbreak in Northern Illinois before many months have passed:

We understand that four wagons passed through four wagons passed through this city on Tuesday morning last, on their way to the State Arsenal at Alton, for the purpose of procuring arms to be used against the Mormons. We fear much trouble will grow out of this difficulty sooner or later. We are also informed that the knowledge of what is going on in this quarter has been brought to the notice of Gov. Ford, and we would suggest whether it is not the duty of his Excellency to protect the innocent in their lives and property.


Note: A slightly longer and somewhat differently worded version of this news item also appeared in the St. Louis Missouri Republican in February of 1844.


 



Vol. II. - No. 147.                   Pittsburgh, March 6, 1844.             Two Cents.



PROBABLE  MORMON  WAR.

A large meeting was recently held at Carthage, Ill., growing out of numerous difficulties of late occurence, between the citizens of Carthage and their neighbors of Nauvoo, at which resolutions were passed strongly denunciatory of the Mormons and their notorious leader, Smith. The Warsaw Message, remarking upon this state of things, holds the following language:

We see no use in attempting to disguise the fact that many in our midst contemplate a total extermination of that people; that the thousands of defenceless women and children, aged and infirm, who are congregated at Nauvoo, must be driven out, aye, driven, scattered, like the leaves before the autumn blast! But what good citizen, let us ask, what lover of his country and his race, but contemplates such an event with horror?


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 148.                   Pittsburgh, March 7, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

A NEW CANDIDATE. -- The Nauvoo Neighbor announces its determination to support Gen. Joseph Smith, the Mormon Prophet, for the Presidency at the election. It is strongly opposed to either Van Buren or Clay.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 160.                   Pittsburgh, March 24, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

MORMONS IN MISSISSIPPI. -- The Mobile Register learns by a letter from Sumter county, Ala., that the Mormons are making a somewhat formidable demonstration in an adjoining county in Mississippi. They commenced operations at Pleasant Springs, late in the fall, and now number about seventy-five proselytes -- some twenty being seceders from the Methodist connexion, and about twenty-six from the Baptist -- the balance from non-professors. They have revently commenced propogating their faith at Brooklyn, only a few miles from the Alabama State line, where they will probably meet with a like success.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 170.                   Pittsburgh, April 2, 1844.             Two Cents.



GREAT  MORMON  EXCITEMENT.

We learn from the Boston Times that there was a tremendous row at the Marlboro' Chapel, in that city, on Monday night. It seems that a Mr. John Dennett [sic - Bennett?], formerly a Mormon, but expelled for some indescretions with a "sister," was the orator of the evening. He had hired the chapel on speculation, and he charged 12 1/2 cents a head admission.Mr. Dennett has a very peculiar style of eloquence, and stands six [sic] feet in his stockings. He commenced by giving with remarkable candor and plainness the history of his amour with a "gentle priestess" of Nauvoo; the Mormons, however, he declared, were themselves guilty of the very sin for which they had excommunicated him. While he was relating his experiences with his Yankee brogue, and in unsophisticated innocence, and bearing down upon the Mormons with irrepressable energy, a snapping of Chinese crackers was heard, and soon a rotten egg came within three inches of his nose, and exploded on the wall behind him. Showers of aromatic snuff and any quanty of wheat flour also lighted upon his devoted cranium, and clothed him in garments of radient beauty. He then attempted to sing an onscene song, when a tremendous yell arose and a battery of all sorts of filth was opened upon his devoted person. The yolk of eggs became matted into his hair and ran down upon his face, mingled with flour and snuff. He was an interesting object indeed to look at; and being unable to stand it further, rushed from the platform bare-headed, over the seats and benches, and for the door, followed by the motely assemblage. -- Philadelphia Times.


Note: The Boston "Dennett" account was similarly paraphrased in the May 4, 1844 issue of the Iowa Lee County Democrat. A lengthier reading of the Philadelphia Times article appeared in the St. Louis People's Organ of April 10, 1844 -- probably taken directly from a Boston paper. This version ends by saying: "... [an] African vocalist came forward and attempted to divert them with a Virginny break-down, Old Dan Tucker, &c. But it was no use... [Bennett left] followed by the vast assemblage, who chased the bare-headed [ex]Mormon around the streets until he disappeared..."


 



Vol. II. - No. 174.                   Pittsburgh, April 6, 1844.             Two Cents.



THE  LATTER-DAY  SAINTS.

The Preston (Eng.) Chronicle notices the return to their home of two young Englishmen, who it seems left their friends anout three years since, and emigrated to Nauvoo, the city of the Mormonites. They have given curious accounts of their sojourn with Joe Smith, and assert that the followers are much dissatisfied with their prospects, both terrestrial and heavenly:

"The English disciples, it seems are regarded with very little favor, and numbers of them, last winter, were out of work for five months, on account of the severity of the season. The frost and snow set in early in November and continued till April. Their sufferings were beyond description. They were without shoes and clothing, they lived on the coarsest food, scarcely fit for hogs, and were huddled together in houses to which there were neither doors nor windows. Last fall, as it is termed, the number of deaths among the Mormonites especially the English portion of them, was fearfully great; the heat and vapory emanations from the Mississippi, spread dysentery, diarrhoea, jaundice, fever and ague among them, and they sickened and died by hundreds."

The journal from which we glean the above, after relating other circumstances connected with the subject, makes the following wise observations:

"We have heard and read a good deal of the Mormon prophet and his followers, and the result is a conviction that Joe's terrestrial paradise is just as much a humbug as his pretended heavenly mission. Those of our countrymen who intend to take themselves and their property to Nauvoo, may depend upon it that they will avoid much suffering, and ultimately be the gainers, if after having paid for their passage, they throw the rest of their money in the river and return home and work as common day laborers."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Daily
Spirit  of  (     )  the  Age.


Vol. II.                        Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Thursday, May 2, 1844.                  No. 12.


Mormonism  Exposed!

Expulsion of a Mormon Elder by the Rev. A. M. Bryan, of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of the city of Pittsburgh, in which a principle of intolerance foreign to every principle of Virtue, Religion and Humanity, was practised and carried out. I call upon all men to witness this act, which betrays a character unworthy of the Savage of the Forest, much more a man professing the Religion of Jesus Christ, and one too (from the position he occupies) that should have compassion on the ignorant, and, as Paul says, should condescend to men of low estate, and not, (because of a difference of sentiment,) show not only a want of gentility, but a spirit which reigns in the hearts of Bigots.

I, RICHARD SAVERY, in company with brother Matthew Smith, this 26th day of April, 1844, called at the Rev. A. M. Bryan's for the purpose of seeing Mr. Mordeica, the Indian Preacher. Mr. Bryan invited us into his house, and, after the usual salutations, the discourse or sermon of said Indian was introduced. Mr. Bryan said that he came well recommended from persons whom he knew and highly respected, and in view of this he called the attention of the community, and opened his church for him, &c. &c. He said that he soon discovered by the introductory remarks of the Indian, that it (the subject,) would prove a perfect failure, and in view of this felt himself very unpleasantly situated, having announced him as worthy the attention of the people as a preacher, and he (the Indian) proving to the contrary, consequently, Mr. Bryan was fearful that the congregation would think he wished to impose upon their good sense, saying that he felt himself perfectly bored. Also, that, were it not in the church, he had no doubt but the congregation qould have hissed the Indian down, remarking that he was wholly incompetent to give correct information even of his own tribe, let alone others.

I then said that the remark of the Indian relative to Democratic and Whig Christians contained more truth than fiction, but as a general thing, his discourse was made up of emptiness, or words without meaning. Mr. Bryan then said that he could not recommend him as a preacher but only as a converted Indian. I then said, that being much interested in the developments of antiquity, as discovered by Messrs. Catherwood and Stephens, which afforded conclusive evidence that this was a land of enlightened nations long before its discovery by Columbus. I at the same time adduced Mr. Norman's book, entitled "Rambles in Yucatan, 1843," on page 180, which says that all the civilized Americans had a Priesthood, and that the ordinance of Circumcision was practiced by the tribes of Mayas of Yucatan, and the Chalsaques [sic - Saques?] of Caho [ sic - Cahokia?], thus affording collateral evidence that they originated from Abraham. I also mentioned other traditions yet extant, that warranted the same idea. Mr. Bryan said that he was acquainted with these facts, which, indeed, were astonishing. I then said, that I had learned by a friend who had conversed with the Indian, that he mentioned concerning a tribe of Indians who now were in possession of metalic plates, covered with hieroglyphics, supposed to be records of important events, &c. &c.

I then said to Mr. Bryan that the plates recently found in the ground in the state of Illinois, (here showing him a fac simile of them,) and the engravings on them when compared with the Egyptain characters, or hoeroglyphics, as found in Mr. Gladdon's late remarks of that country, abundantly proved the Aborigines of this country to be the seed of Abraham and descendants of Joseph, the son of Jacob. Mr. Bryan then asked me if these plates had been translated. I answered that I understood they had been. I next adverted in a circumstance relative to a Mr. Chandler, an Egyptian Antiquarian, who ontained five mummies in that country, which [had been] exhibited in the city of New York, at which [exhibition] [it had been] [discovered] that one of the mummies had a large protuberance on the left side, which awakened the curiosity of a gentleman, who proposed that it be examined, and in doing so found it to contain Papyrus or Parchment, containing writing, a portion of which was translated in that city. The proprietor then conveyed them to Philadelphia, where the same was translated as in New York. Being unable to decypher the remainder, he was advised to take them to Joseph Smith, in Ohio, who pretended to have the power or gift of translation. On arriving there, he presented the parchment to him, who said that in an hour he would acquaint him with the matter, at the end of which he returned, having translated the same as in New York and Philadelphia, and much more, pronouncing it to be the Book of Abraham, the characters of which closely resemble those on the plates lately found in Pike county, Ill.

Here Mr. B. remarked that no man on earth had this power, and manifested his contempt by a sneer, that Joseph Smith should be so presumptious as to claim to be inspired of God and said he would as soon believe the moon made of green cheese; I replied that ?I presumed men now were like men anciently, and were as susceptible of these impressions from God now as then. He being unchangeable, and then cited Moses, Aaron, Samuel, and David to prove that they, by means of the Urim and Thummim, had this power, and could receive answers from God through this according to their desires, and if Joseph Smith had had thos power, he was an extraordinary man, remarking that many honest men believed it, and if not it was a great humbug.

Here Mr. B. appeared somewhat pale, and asked me if I was a Mormon, I replied yess; then pointing to brother Smith he asked if he was, who said yes, whereupon Mr. Bryan arose, opened the door, (pointing to the street,) said good morning! Being sensible of the insult here manifested without the slightest provocation on our part, and seeing him betray a passion so unworthy the name of Him who is for our pattern in all things, who was acquainted with grief, and finally was put to death by the hireling Priests of that generation. I said to Mr. B. "do I understand you mean by this to turn us out of your house?" He said "yes," at which brother Smith remarked to him that he showed a pretty spirit for a Christian, -- I also said, quoting the 2d verse of the 24th chapter of Isaiah, which says, "As with the people so with the Priest," &c. He then cried "get out of my house!"

I have here stated all the conversation that took place between Mr. Bryan and myself and do declare in the fear of God, with reference to the judgment that nothing is said contrary to what was said, but is word for word as near as memory could serve me. Therefore you see, my respected fellow citizens, that nothing save that I was a Mormon caused such shameful treatment. Now, I do say, that were all men like him, where would liberty be enjoyed? The answer is obvious to every mind, and if I, together with my brethren, are to be thus treated, simply for expressing our sentiments openly and fearlessly, in the name of justice, virtue and mercy, what will Pagans or Infidels say of such "Christianity?" From my soul I pity such men, and I do hope that he may repent of such sin: -- humble himself before God, and practice benevolence, charity, brotherly kindness and humanity.

With respect I am your fellow citizen and lover of freedom,   RICHARD SAVARY,

Elder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, called Mormons.


==> At the request of Mr. Savary we insert the above. Mr. S. is a respectable mechanic of our city, and feeling the body of citizens in which he belongs insulted by the treatment he received desires to lay the matter before the public.

We have no remarks to make on the above. If Mr. Bryan desires to explain or reply our columns are at his command.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 197.                   Pittsburgh, May 3, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

MORE MORMONS. -- The St. Louis New Era states that one hundred Mormons arrived at that city on the Steamer Charlotte, on their way to Nauvoo.



==> It is said that Joe Smith, the Mormon Prophet, has turned his wife out of his house, for refusing to inform him what was the purport of her conversation with a gentleman of the same sect. It is rumored that she is now in St. Louis.

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 199.                   Pittsburgh, May 6, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

MORMONS. -- On Tuesday of last week one hundred and fifty Mormons arrived at St. Louis, on the Congress, from England, making three hundred who have passed that city within ten days on their way to Nauvoo, the Mormon paradise.

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 211.                   Pittsburgh, May 20, 1844.             Two Cents.



                                From the St. Louis Republican

JO  SMITH.

Dissensions among the Mormons at Nauvoo. -- We have good reasons for placing reliance in the details of a letter, the contents of which are hereafter stated,

(read original article from Missouri)



Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Evangelist & Observer.

Vol. ?                                 Pittsburgh, Monday, June 4, 1844.                               No. ?



NAUVOO.

The Ohio Observer says, that "a riot lately took place at Nauvoo, in the course of which a man named Foster, undertook to shoot Joe Smith. Joe is said to have been slightly wounded. A Mormon Temple is going forward, some fifty men being at work upon it. The Mormons have started a Theatre." Holy city! New Jerusalem!! Indeed! rather is is the new and corrupt Sodom and Gomorrah... Gain, or whatever gratifies the fleshly appetites of Joe Smith, the great General, tavern keeper, and libertine of Nauvoo, is his principle, and that of his vile clan, with the exception of a few deluded persons...


Note: Rev. Milton Bird's "Nauvoo" article, as published in the Evangelist and Observer, was responded to by Apostle John E. Page, in the June 15, 1844 issue of The People's Organ, published by the LDS Church at Pittsburgh.


 


THE  BEAVER  ARGUS.

Vol. XX.                         Beaver, Pa., Wednesday,   June 6, 1844.                      No. 26.

 

More trouble at Nauvoo. -- The Alton Telegraph of Saturday week, states that a Deputy Marshall of the District of Illinois, recently proceeded to Nauvoo, with a process issued by the Judge of the District Court of the United States, for the arrest of Jeremiah Smith, upon a criminal charge of embezzling money. The deputy marshal succeeded in arresting Smith; when Joe caused his follower to be taken out of the possession of the United State's Officer, and brought before the municipal court of Nauvoo, for an examination under the writ of habeas corpus, issued by that immaculate body. The depury in a letter, states that the examination was to come off on the next day, and the result was involved in doubt. He farther avowed a fixed determination on his part, fearlessly and faithfully to execute the process of the United States Court, regardless of the course of this mock tribunal of justice, whose chief business is the release of all rogues who take shelter at Nauvoo, and are subsequently arrested by any process of law, whether issued from the State or Federal courts. -- Should Joe Smith refuse to surrender the accused into the hands of the deputy marshal, Col. Prentiss will repair in person to the scene of the action, with such a force as will insure obedience to the Constituted authorities of the Government.

==> P. S. -- The Mormons are in deep trouble, surrounded with a large body of armed citizens of the adjacent country, who threaten to assail the city of Nauvoo. This terrible state of affairs has been provoked by the continued resistance of the laws by Joe Smith.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 227.                   Pittsburgh, June 7, 1844.             Two Cents.

 

==> A new Mormon paper has been started in New York called the "Prophet." It advocates the doctrine of Mormonism, and the election of Joseph Smith, a western man with American principles, to the Presidency.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 228.                   Pittsburgh, June 8, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

INCREASE OF MORMONISM. -- The St. Louis Reporter estimates the increase of Mormonism during the past year at six or eight hundred from foreign countries, and three or four hundred from the United States, (principally from Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Massachusetts.) Fifty or sixty missionaries arrived at St. Louis on the 29th ult., on their way to preach Mormonism in different parts of the country.



We understand that Jo Smith has sent recently fifty-one missionaries into the different States to preach Mormonism, and electioneer for the Prophet as a candidate for the Presidency. He should employ the "Buckeye blacksmith" and the "Kentucky pump-borer," for they are marketable missionaries, and have had some experience in electioneering business.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1 No. 1.                             Pittsburgh, June 15, 1844.                           Price 2 cts.



... Mr. Bird copies from the 'Ohio Observer.' which says 'a riot took place at Nauvoo, in the course of which a man named Foster, undertook to kill Joe Smith. Joe is said to have been slightly wounded.' Mr. Bird, would you desire to intimate because Foster endeavored to kill Joe Smith that that was evidence Smith ought to die, or that it was proof that he is a bad man...

If the Mormons are knaves, they are not such consumate fools as not to know that such vile abuse never is designed to redeem them from errors, if in error they are... You can slander, but you are not the Man, Mr. Bird, who can argue or render a reason... At this you may whine out the Mormons are not worthy of my notice. -- Then be consistant and let them alone entirely and never mind them, only when they harm you or those over whom you have charge. --

... I have heard so many sober candid gentlemen, who are not Mormons and probably never will be, say that they were heartily sick of all the foolery, manifested about the Mormons in the characters of editors and ministers. The means is close at hand to put down the Mormons, if it can be done at all, and that is this: The Mormons profess to believe the scriptures and consequently preach them to the people, they quote scriptures to show that the scriptures call for such a book as the book of Mormon professes to be. Also, to show that there is such a prophet to be; they preach that the scriptures call for the gathering of the people, just as the Mormons are doing -- the first thing to settle then is; Do or do not the scriptures call for a literal gathering of the Lord's people in the 'last days,' if they actually do not then as a matter of course the Mormons are of the Anti-Christ. In that case there is no call for a prophet, or such a book as the book of Mormon professes to be... Mr. Bird, editor of the 'Obeserver' and all others like him in slandering Joseph Smith and the Mormons are only sinners of the darkest dye...

Where is the press that has not teamed with every tale that could possibly be invented by debauchees and prostitutes against us... If nine tenths of the church members of the Latter Day Saints in Nauvoo, should apostatize and go to the devil, it would not necessarily follow that Joseph Smith is a bad man...

All I regret in the case is, that a man like Rev. Bird will thus give himself to inquiry without a provocation. The Mormons nor Joseph Smith has never laid a straw in his way, nor never will. We pity the insipid spirit that prompts him thus to treat an abused, and as a community a persecuted people. May God give him repentance unto salvation, is the prayer of your humble friend.     JOHN E. PAGE.


Note 1: The Peoples' Organ was an LDS paper designed to be published in support of Joseph Smith's campaign for the U. S. Presidency during the summer of 1844. It was edited by Apostle John E. Page and was the successor to his Gospel Light, published in Pittsburgh during 1843.

Note 2: In attempting to understand Apostle Page's cryptic remarks concerning "debauchees and prostitutes" it is useful to recall that the former top LDS leader John C. Bennett was generally characterized by the Mormons of this period as a "debauchee." Page's reference to "prostitutes" is illuminated by what his understudy, Elder William Small of Pittsburgh, reportedly said concerning the testimony given by Miss Martha Brotherton regarding secret polygamy at Nauvoo: "such evidence was given by PROSTITUTES, of whom a number were at Nauvoo." As Thomas Smethurst (who knew Miss Brotherton) subsequently observed in the Morning Chronicle of July 27, 1842, the Mormon Elder's words gave the "impression on the minds of the people that the said Martha H. Brotherton was a prostitute," and thus her testimony was not worthy of consideration by the LDS authorities. All of this carefully chosen rhetoric served to further obscure the hidden Mormon polygamy at Nauvoo, at the expense of the presumably innocent characters of candid ex-Mormons like Martha Brotherton.


 



Vol. II. - No. 234.                   Pittsburgh, June 15, 1844.             Two Cents.


 

AN ATTACK ON NAUVOO. -- The St. Louis Gazette of the 4th, states that an organized party of five or six hundred men has started for Nauvoo, to release from the custody of the Mormons, Dr. Hitchcock, U. S. Marshal of Iowa. Dr. H. went to Nauvoo to arrest a criminal, and was seized and confined by the Prophet's followers.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 235.                   Pittsburgh, June 17, 1844.             Two Cents.

 

MORMONITE CONVENTION The Presidency. -- There was a meeting at Military Hall, New York, on Tuesday evening, called for the purpose of advancing the claims of Joe Smith of Nauvoo, the leader of the Mormonites, or "Latter Day Saints," to the Presidency of the United States. The Republic says, --

"The attendance was small, some fifty men, twenty women, and a few boys composing the whole number of those present. Two brokers, by the name of Pratt, both originally from New York State, but more recently from Missouri, made speeches, strongly denunciatory of Mr. Van Buren, Mr. Clay, the principal characters of the nation and of Missouri, all of whom were called murderers, and robbers, and in comparison with whom Joe Smith, the Mormon Prophet, was alone worthy of being entrusted with the government of the country. Twelve delegates were appointed to a convention to be held at Utica, on the 23d of next August."



==> The St. Louis Reporter says that seven indictments have been found by the Grand Jury of Hancock county, Ill., against Joe Smith, the Mormon Prophet. He is charged with perjury, larceny, &c., &c.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II. - No. 240.                   Pittsburgh, June 22, 1844.             Two Cents.

 

==> A paper was started at Nauvoo, a short time since, called the Expositor. We do not know the precise character of the sheet, but its course was offensive to the Prophet, and in order to put it down, he had an ordinance passed under which it was declared to be a nuisance, and the City Marshal of Nauvoo, at the head of a posse, repaired to the office, took out the materials, and burnt them on the street!


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. 1 No. 2.                             Pittsburgh, June 29, 1844.                           Price 2 cts.



For the People's Organ.                        

Elder Sidney Rigdon Arrived.

This morning, June the 27th, on board the steamer "REVENUE," Elder Rigdon in company with Elder Ebenezer Robinson; designs to make a permanent residence in this city (Pittsburgh) for this season at least. Elder Rigdon will visit his friends the coming week in the country; and on the first Sabbath of July next, the 7th day of the month, his friends and old acquaintance, together with the public at large, can avail themselves of the opportunity of hearing Mr. Rigdon for themselves. The "Post" and other papers have been active in giving currency to an error relative to the origin of the Book of Mormon as being but the product of one "SOLOMON SPAULDING," of this city. Mr. Rigdon is the man who, it is said, obtained the manuscript of S. Spaulding, and from which it is said he made the "Book of Mormon." We hope that Rev. S. Williams will now come out and sustain, if possible, what he published in a pamphlet in the spring of 1842, concerning this matter; or, by remaining silent on the subject, prove to the honest part of this city that he only took advantage of the absence of Mr. Rigdon to wickedly slander his (Rigdon's) character, in order to save from utter ruin a rickety bantling of a system of religion that has nothing better than falsehood and misrepresentation to sustain it. Rally your forces, Rev. Williams, for you are certainly in danger of being showed up in dark colors relative to what you set forth in your pamphlet.

I presume none will dispute that Elder Rigdon is amply able to speak for himself concerning this matter. Some no doubt will say it is not worth your while to go and hear him; but those that do will evince to sensible men that they feel that their speculating craft is in danger -- for truth and its advocates have nothing to fear, for truth is like oil, it will rise on the top in the end, and no mistake. Elder Rigdon's character is too well known as an orator and a gentleman of intelligence to need any puffing to command public attention in any place whatever.     JOHN E. PAGE.
For the People's Organ.                

"The Time has Come."

Yes, 'the time has come' that the free thinking people of these United States are not to be so easily 'humbugged' into panic about the Mormons as they have been, concerning some momentary flare up about 'Joe Smith' and the Saints at Nauvoo, got up by some political demon-gogues.

Let the good people keep it in strict remembrance that Gen. Joseph Smith is a Jeffersonian candidate for the Presidency of these United States. Remember too, that Mr. Hiram Smith, Esq., the prophet's brother is a candidate for a Representative in the Illinois Legislature. True 'the time has come' for the mobocrats of Nauvoo and Carthage, in Hancock county, Illinois, to resume their business, and that is to combine all the intelligence of the braying asses they have in their midst, to make the people believe if possible, that 'Joe' and his neighbors are a desperate set. But it won't go down the throats so easy as they vainly hope for. Fourteen years experience of the people of these United States, in watching with a vigilent eye the character and movements of the Mormons has taught them that 'the time has come' that it is as necessary to hear both sides of the case in order yo know the truth of any matter concerning the Mormons, as it is concerning any other matter. Free trade and equal rights.     JOHN E. PAGE.


Note 1: When Sidney Rigdon moved from Nauvoo to Pittsburgh in 1844, he was, no doubt, aware that he was entering a media battlefield in which the local press delighted in attacking the Mormons. Throughout the early 1840s various Pittsburgh and Philadelphia newspapers continually printed articles questioning and debunking the Saints' own explanations for the origin of Mormonism and its sacred writ. Stories of Rigdon's probable earlier association with Pittsburgh publishing notables Robert and Joseph Patterson, Silas Engles, and Jonathan H. Lambdin had been freely bandied about in the city for several years. Rigdon must have returned to his old home ready to defend himself against the then current charges saying that he had purloined in Pittsburgh a story written by Solomon Spalding and that he had subsequently turned that story into the basis for the Book of Mormon.

Note 2: Apostle Page's words about "the mobocrats of Nauvoo" probably should be taken to refer to those associated with Elder William Law and his Nauvoo Expositor. The first issue of that paper printed considerable evidence to establish the fact of hidden Mormon polygamy at Nauvoo. By mid-1844 Apostle Page was, of course, privy to that secret and the Church's need to suppress any and all reports of its existence.


 



Vol. XI. - No. 24.                   Wednesday,  July  3, 1844.                      Whole No. 544.


THE  MORMONS --
EXCITEMENT  IN  ILLINOIS.

All our intelligence from Illinois indicates the probability and almost the certainty of aspeedy and bloody collision between the Mormons and the surrounding citizens of Illinois. The St. Louis Republican of last Monday says: -- Our intelligence from the seat of the disturbances at Nauvoo, is down to Friday night last. We learn by the Die Vernon, that great excitement existed in all the counties, on both sides of the river, and that a resort to arms was inevitable. The Die Vernon, on her last trip took about sixty stand of arms from Quincy to Warsaw, and efforts were making to get arms from other quarters. Some 300 of the Mormons, it is understood, had left Nauvoo, but Joe Smith had put a stop to this migrating disposition by anathematizing all persons who had expressed any intention of leaving the city.

The citizens of Hancock county, in which Nauvoo is situated, held an immense mass meeting at Carthage, the seat of justice, on the 13th inst. The strong preamble and serious resolutions previously adopted at a meeting of the citizens of Warsaw, in the same county, were adopted unanimously as the sense of this meeting. The substance of these resolutions we give this morning. A committee of one from each precinct in the county was then appointed to draft resolutions expressive of the future action of the people. While the committee were [met?], Dr. Barns, one of the persons who went with the officers to Nauvoo, for the purpose of arresting the rioters engaged in the destruction of the Expositor, having just arrived, came into the meeting and reported the result of their proceedings, which was, that the persons charged in the writs were duly arrested, but taken from the officers' hands on a writ of habeas corpas from the municipal court and discharged, and the following potent words entered upon the records: HONORABLY DISCHARGED.

The committee then returned and reported the following preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted, and O. C. Skinner and Weller Bagby were appointed the committee to go to Springfield.

Whereas, the officer charged with the execution of a writ against Joseph Smith and others, for riot in the county of Hancock, which said writ said officer has served upon said Smith and others refuse to obey the mandate of said writ; and whereas, in he opinion of this meeting, it is impossible for said officers to raise a posse of sufficient strength to execute said writ; and whereas, it is the opinion of this meeting, that the riot is still progressing, and that violence is mediated and determined on, it is the opinion of this meeting that the circumstances of the case require the interposition of Executive power: Therefore,

Resolved, That a deputation of two discreet men be sent to Springfield to solicit such interposition.

Resolved, That such deputation be furnished with a certified copy of this resolution and be authorized to obtain evidence by affidavit, and otherwise, in regard to the violence which has already been committed and is still further mediated.

The meeting afterwards determined that their operations should not be retarded by these resolutions, but all should arm and equip themselves forthwith. Six places of encampment were appointed. The latest information is that the citizens were ordered to assemble at their various places of encampment on Wednesday last. The steamboat Hibernian brought information to St. Louis that the people, who were rapidly concentrating for that purpose, would move to an attack upon Nauvoo on Wednesday. A patrol was kept at Warsaw, and all suspicious persons were arrested.

Friday: 8 o'clock, A. M. -- We are informed by gentlemen direct from Carthage, that the citizens are ordered to assemble at their various places of rendezvous on Wednesday next.

A gentleman from Nauvoo, who arrived in Carthage to day, reports that almost 200 persons, including nearly all of Joe's enemies in Nauvoo, have left the city, with their moveables -- being in fear of their lives.

Preparations are making throughout the country, for the coming contest.



THE  MORMON  EXCITEMENT.

The following from the St. Louis New Era of the 17th is the latest from the scene of the expected war: --

Great excitement prevails in Hancock, Adams, and the adjacent counties of Illinois, and also in the neighboring counties in Iowa and Missouri. The whole country is preparing for action. An immediate collision of the most sanguinary character is anticipated. The same spirit seems to prevail that formerly prevaded Jackson county and the Grand river country in Missouri. Several thousand persons had intended to go from that portion of Illinois to the Peoria Convention, and steamboats had been chartered for that purpose, but they now say that the danger and excitement at home is so great that they cannot go.

That paper of the 18th has later news:

LATTER FROM WARSAW. -- By the Borea, which arrived this morning, we have received another Extra issued from the office of the Warsaw Signal, dated Junr 17th. It contains an address reported by Thos. C. Sharp, Esq., which was unanimously adopted by a meeting of the citizens, held at Warsaw on the 14th inst., and ordered to be published in connexion with a preamble and resolutions adopted by a mass meeting held by the citizens of Hancock county at Carthage on the previous day; these resolutions are the same as those passed by the Warsaw meeting on the 13th -- breathing war and destruction to the whole Mormon race.

At the bottom of the Extra we find an article in substance as follows:

LATEST ORDERS. -- The citizens of this county are ordered to assemble at their various places of rendezvous on Wednesday next, by the officer, from whom Smith was rescued, and there to receive general orders to cooperate as a posse to aid in arresting Smith. Citizens of the adjoining State, Territory and Counties can join and act with the 'posse comitatus' without violating any law.

In addition, we learn from the officers of the Boreas that at Warsaw on Sunday, the 16th inst., there was a muster of volunteers, and that they turned out 150 men, armed and equipped for the war. Great excitement is said to prevail in the vicinity of Warsaw, which seems to be on the increase every day, To-morrow is the day set for general rendezvous of the forces who are to aid in the arresting of Joe Smith, and unless the Executive interfers by ordering out the militia, in accordance with the wishes of the citizens, we are afraid it will not end without bloodshed.



From Nauvoo -- Mormon War.

The St. Louis Republican of Saturday, June 22, has the following:

THE MORMON AFFAIR. -- The steamboat Waverly left Nauvoo on Thursday afternoon, and Warsaw in the night. She lay at Nauvoo some time, and ascertained that Gen. Jo. Smith had 2,300 men under arms, and ready for defensive operations. At Warsaw and Carthage, it was understood about 3,000 citizens were under arms, but were awaiting an additional force of a thousand men, before they directed an attempt to serve the writs in the hands of the officer. Of course, they would be ready to sustain the constituted authority, if necessary, to the extremity of making war upon Smith and his men.


LATER FROM NAUVOO. -- The St. Louis Reveille of Sunday, says:

By the clerk of the stramer Gen. Brooke, which came down yesterday evening, we are informed that Gov. Ford had arrived at Carthage, approved of present operations, to further which he had ordered out 2,500 men. By this time, it is supposed that active preparations have been commenced.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TIOGA  [   ]  EAGLE.

Vol. VI.                        Wellsborough, Pa., Wednesday, July 3, 1844.                           No. ?



Outrage at Nauvoo. -- The steamer Osprey arrived at St. Louis on the 12th, and reports that on Monday night, the 11th, the office of the "Expositor" -- the Anti-Jo Smith paper, was destroyed by a band of the Prophet's dupes. The Expositor was established by a number of Mormons who opposed Jo Smith's course, and the disclosures made through it completely enraged Jo and his supporters. The Council, therefore, declared that paper a nuisance, and then sent the City Marshall with an armed posse to destroy the office. The work of destruction was completed about ten o'clock at night.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II.                           Pittsburgh, Pa.,  Monday,  July 8, 1844.                           No. 252.



DEATH  OF  JOE  SMITH  AND  OTHERS.

It appears that Joe and Hiram Smith, and a number of other Mormon leaders were in jail, confined on certain offences against the laws of the State. The Carthage Greys, a volunteer company, were placed as a guard around the jail. About 6 o'clock, on the evening of the 27th, an attempt was made by the Mormons on the outside to rescue the prisoners from the custody of the Guard. A youth, about 19 years of age (a Mormon,) began the fray of shooting the sentinel at the door, wounding him severely in the shoulder. -- Simultaneously with this attempt, the Mormons on the inside of the jail, including the Smiths, presented pistols through the windows and doors of the jail and fired upon the guard without; wounding, it is supposed, mortally, four of the old citizens of Hancock! It is enough to say that this bloodthirsty attempt on the part of the Mormons, was the signal for certain and sure vengeance. The lives of Joe Smith and his brother Hiram, and Richards, Joe Smith's Secretary, were quickly taken, and we believe no others. Carthage was filled with Mormons, previous to the affray, the Mormons appeared to be collecting around the jail, for the purpose of attempting the rescue of their leader.

There our intelligence ends -- what took place after this, God only knows. Mormons immediately left for Nauvoo to carry the news of the death of the Prophet. It is feared that the Mormons at Nauvoo will be so exasperated as to exterminate the Governor and his small force.

The Boreas brought down the most of the women and children from Warsaw. It is feared their town is in ashes ere this.

Our citizens were aroused this morning by the ringing of bells and a call to arms. Our three independent companies are already in marching order. Major Flood hasordered out the militia of this regiment, and the steamer Boreas is waiting to convey them to the scene of action.

There is no knowing where this dreadful affair will end. Many have expressed fears that our city is in danger, because most of the Warsaw families have taken refuge here -- but we believe there is no danger, we are too far from the scene of action.

Messengers have just left for Hannibal, and the towns below, for the purpose of arousing the Missourians. The excitement in our city is intense and the anxiety to hear the fate of Gov. Ford and his men is very great.

At the moment of the murder of Joe Smith, at Carthage, Gov. Ford is supposed to have been encamped on the prairie, about six miles out from Nauvoo. Col. Singleton was in command at Nauvoo, with only 120 troops. Great fears are entertained for their safety, if the Mormons rose upon them after hearing of the death of Prophet.

It is also feared that both Curthage and Warsaw have been burned by the Mormons, as threats of that kind have been made. The women and children have been taken to places of safety. A portion of them came down on the Boreas this morning. The German Guards and Rifle Company are now assembling, as well as a portion of the militia, far the purpose of marching to the scene of action.

The Boreas has been chartered to take up troops. Our city has the appearance of a military camp.
          Quincy Whig.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II.                           Pittsburgh, Pa.,  Tuesday,  July 9, 1844.                           No. 253.

 

==> THE PROGRESS OF MOB LAW. -- The murder of Joe Smith and his brother Hiram is another fearful evidence of the rapid progress that mob law is making in our country, and will create alarming forebodings for the permanancy of the internal safety of the country, if the strong arm of the civil authorities is not raised to prevent citizens of every shade of opinion. That provision of the constitution which purports to grant permission to all to worship God according to the dictates of their own consciences is becoming a dead letter; the religious freedom of which we boast will soon be trampled under the feet feet of the mob, whose brutal passions can only be appeased by the destruction of property and the spilling of blood.

Whatever may have been the faults of Smith, none could have been of sufficient magnitude to justify the punishment inflicted, and, with the information we have received, we cannot regard his death in any other light than as a cowardly and brutal murder.

Smith had been charged with serious crimes against the laws; a clamor was raised to have him punished; personal violence was threatened; perhaps to avert the shedding of blood, he surrendered himself to the civil authorities, under a promise that he should be protected and have a fair trial. A military guard was placed round his prison to protect him, but instead of guarding him and letting the laws which it was alleged he had violated take their course, they sent a "hundred balls through his body" without even respecting the formalities that have heretofore been observed by those who believe in the efficacy of Lynch Laws. The absurdity or fanaticism of the religious opinions of the 'prophet' will induce many to look upon this bloody act with a lenient eye, but the true friends of rational religion cannot but regard it with horror, and tremble for fearful outrages on other creeds, for which the murder of the Mormons may form a precedent.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI. - No. 25.                   Wednesday,  July  10, 1844.                      Whole No. 545.


We find the following in the Cincinnati Gazette of Wednesday last. The death of the Smiths has beyond all doubt led to a bloody collision between the Troops and the Mormons. The situation of Gov. Ford, it will be seen, was critical. Should the Mormons have attacked him before he could retreat they would be very likely to have destroyed the small body of men under his command. Their destruction will infallibly bring upon the Mormons an extirpating war. From the tenor of former advices it seems the citizens of the surrounding counties were eager for some plea to drive the Mormons from the State. They are likely to have their hands full now. We shall look for further news with great anxiety.

DEATH  OF  JOE  AND  HIRAM  SMITH.

The steamboat Boreas just in from Warsaw, brings shocking intelligence from the scene of the Mormon war. The following slip from the office of the Warsaw Signal explains the dreadful tragedy:

"Joe and Hiram Smith are dead -- shot this afternoon. An attack from the Mormons is expected every hour. -- Will not the surrounding counties rush instantly to our rescue?
          Warsaw, June 27th, 1844."


It seems that the circumstances attending the killing of the Mormon Prophet and his brother Hiram are as follows: On yesterday Gov. Ford left Carthage with about 120 soldiers for the purpose of taking possession of the "Nauvoo Legion" and their arms. They arrived at Nauvoo about noon, and called for the assembling of the Legion. About 2000 men with arms immediately responded to its call. These troops were put under command of Col. Singleton of Brown county, who accompanied Gov. Ford to Nauvoo.

The Governor finding all quiet left Nauvoo about 5 o'clock P. M. with a company of 60 men for the purpose of encamping about seven miles from the city.

At about the same time that Gov. Ford left Nauvoo, the Prophet and his brother were killed at Carthage, under the following circumstances, as near as we can ascertain them.

Joe and Hiram were both confined in the debtor's room of the Carthage jail, awaiting their trial on the charge of treason. The jail was strongly guarded by soldiers and anti-mormons, who had been placed there by the Governor. A Mormon attempted to rush by the guard for the purpose of forcing his way into the jail. -- He was opposed by the guard and fired a pistol at one of the guard, giving him a slight wound.

A general confusion ensued in the crowd around the jail. Joe and his Mormon fellow-prisoners it seems provided themselves with pistols abd commenced firing upon the guards below. He attempted to escape from the window, when a hundred balls entered his body, and he fell a lifeless corpse.

His brother Hiram shared the same fate. Richards, a leading Mormon, was badly wounded. There our intelligence ends -- what took place after this, God only knows. Mormons immediately left for Nauvoo to carry the news of the death of the Prophet. It is feared that the Mormons at Nauvoo will be so exasperated as to exterminate the Governor and his small force.

The Boreas brought down the most of the women and children from Warsaw. It is feared their town is in ashes before this.

Our citizens were aroused this morning by the ringing of bells and a call to arms. Our three independent companies are already in marching order. Major Flood hasordered out the militia of this regiment, and the steamer Boreas is waiting to convey them to the scene of action.

There is no knowing where this dreadful affair will end. Many have expressed fears that our city is in danger, because most of the Warsaw families have taken refuge here -- but we believe there is no danger, we are too far from the scene of action.

Messengers have just left for Hannibal and the towns below for the purpose of arousing the Missourians. The excitement in our city is intense and the anxiety to hear the fate of Governor Ford and his men is very great.




Death of Joe Smith Confirmed.

We were confident from the manner in which the death of Smith was announced that it was true, notwithstanding many doubted and pronounced it a hoax. The following extracts are from the St. Louis New Era of the 20th, an evening paper: --

MORE MORMON NEWS -- From passengers and officers of the steamboat Dove, we learn that on yesterday a messenger from Governor Ford arrived at Rushville calling on the militia to march speedily to Carthage to resist an attack apprehended from the Mormons. He stated that about 4 o'clock on the 27th, a mob of two hundred men, armed, painted and disguised came to Carthage, demanded the key of the jail, and took out Joe Smith, Hiram Smith and William Richards, and shot them forthwith. They were fearful that the Mormons would retaliate this murder by burning Carthage and Warsaw. Several hundred of the militia were about to march from Schuyler when the Dove left. The Governor's message arrived at Rushville about 12 o'clock. Those who came down on the boat consider this news as authentic. If true, it is both alarming and disgraceful. It was cruel and cowardly to murder unarmed prisoners when they had surrendered themselves and were in the custody of the laws. They were under the protection of the laws; the word of the Governor and the faith of the State were pledged to protect them from mobs and to secure to them a fair trial.

An extra from the Alton Telegraph contains letters from G. T. M. Davis, from which we learn that the two Smith, Richards, and also Phelps, a Mormon, were killed by the mob at Carthage. Three citizens of Hancock county were wounded in the attack on the jail; their names were Mills, Galagher, and Vorhees. Mr. Davis apprehended great violence, and feared an indiscriminate extermination of the Mormon population. He was endeavoring to allay it, and Gov. Ford was trying to restrain Mormons and the populace.


LATEST ACCOUNTS FROM NAUVOO. -- The Mendota left Nauvoo yesterday at 4 o'clock. -- The Captain says he satid at Nauvoo several hours and talked with a number of the Mormons; that whilst there a body of Mormons came in bearing the dead bodies of Joe Smith and Hyrum Smith. Mr. Phelps was not killed, but was in Nauvoo when the Mendota left, making a speech to the Mormons, and advising them to peace. No Mormons were killed except Joe and Hyrum Smith. The Mormons all expressed a determination to keep the peace and not to resort to arms except in necessary self-defence.

They state that at Carthage the Mormons were confined; that about fifty or one hundred men disguised suddenly rushed on the jail jouse; that the guard fired on them and wounded three of them; that the men in disguise fired into the jail and killed Hyrum Smith, before the door was opened. Joe Smith had a revolving pistol, and fired it two or three times without effect, bit was himself soon killed by the assailants, that Taylor, the editor of the Nauvoo Neighbor, was in jail, and was shot through the thigh, but not seriously injured; Richards was not injured. After the assault the disguised mob retreated, and it was not even known who they were. The guard consisted of fifty men, left by the Governor, of whom eight or ten were on duty when the attack was made on the jail house.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


THE  BEAVER  ARGUS.

Vol. XX.                             Beaver, Pa., Wednesday,   July 10, 1844.                           No. 28.



IMPORTANT  NEWS.

We find the following in the Cincinnati Gazette of Wednesday last. The death of the Smiths has beyond all doubt led to a bloody collision between the Troops and the Mormons. The situation of Gov. Ford it will be seen was critical. Should the Mormons have attacked him before he could retreat they would be very likely to have destroyed the small body of men under his command. Their destruction will infallibly bring upon the Mormons an extirpating war. From the tenor of former advices it seems the citizens of the surrounding country were eager for some plea to drive the Mormons from the State. They are likely to have their hands full now. We shall look for further news with great anxiety.

Death of Joe and Hiram Smith.

We received the following last evening by a passenger.

(From the St. Louis Evening Gazette, Extra.)

Friend Flagg -- Enclosed you have a copy of an extra issued at Quincy. We left Nauvoo about day-light this morning (Friday 28th,) all was quiet. The Mormons have not heard of the death of the SITHS, as Gov. Ford, who was encamped a few miles back, had (as supposed) intercepted the messengers from Carthage.

At Warsaw all was excitement. The women and children were all removed, and an immediate attack was expected from the Mormons.

We met the "Boreas," just above Quincy, with 300 men armed and equipped for Warsaw, eager for fight.

I send the "Quincy Herald," printed this morning, containing the particulars of Smith's death.
                          In haste yours &c.   A. J. Stone.
On board the Steamboat St. Croix,
Friday evening, June 28, 1844.




From the Quincy Herald, Friday, 3 o'clock.

DEATH OF THE PROPHET!

JOE AND HIRAM SMITH ARE DEAD.

The steamboat Boreas, just in from Warsaw, brings shocking intelligence from the scene of the Mormon war. The following slip from the office of the Warsaw Signal explains the dreadful tragedy:

"Joe and Hiram Smith are dead -- shot this afternoon. An attack from the Mormons is expected every hour. Will not the surrounding counties rush instantly to our rescue?"
Warsaw, June 27, 1844"

It seems that the circumstances attending the killing of the Mormon Prophet and his brother Hiram are as follows: On yesterday, Gov. Ford left Carthage with about 120 soldiers for the purpose of taking possession of the "Nauvoo Legion" and their arms. They arrived at Nauvoo about noon, and called for the assembling of the Legion and their arms. About 2000 men with arms immediately responded to ots call. These troops were put under command of Col. Singleton of the Brown county, who accompanied Gov. Ford to Nauvoo.

The Governor finding all quiet left Nauvoo about 5 o'clock P. M. with a company of 60 men for the purpose of encamping about seven miles from the city.

At about the same time that Gov. Ford left Nauvoo, the Prophet and his brother were killed at Carthage, under the following circumstances, as near as we can ascertain them:

Joe and Hiram are both confined in the debtor's room of the Carthage jail, awaiting their trial on the charge of treason. The jail was strongly guarded by soldiers and anti-Mormons, who had been placed there by the Governor. A Mormon attempted to rush by the guards for the purpose of forcing his way into the jail. He was opposed by the guard, and fired a pistol at one of the guards, giving him a slight wound.

A general confusion ensued in the crowd around the jail. Joe and his fellow Mormon fellow-prisoners it seems had provided themselves with pistols, and commenced firing upon the guard within. He attempted to escape from the window, when a hundred balls entered his body, and he fell lifeless corpse.

His brother Hiram shared the same fate. -- Richards, a leading Mormon, was badly wounded. There our intelligence ends -- what took place after this, God only knows. Mormons immediately left for Nauvoo, to carry news of the death of the Prophet. It is feared that the Mormons at Nauvoo will be so exasperated as to exterminate the Governor and his small force.

The Boreas brought down most of the women and children from Warsaw. It is feared their town is in ashes before this.

Our citizens were aroused this morning by the ringing of bells and a call to arms. Our three independent companies are already in marching order. Maj. Flood has ordered out the militia of the regiment, and the steamer Boreas is waiting to convey them to the scene of action.

There is no knowing where this dreadful affair will end. Many have expressed fears that our city is in danger, because most of the Warsaw families have taken refuge here -- but we believe there is no danger, we are too far from the scene of action.

Messengers have just left for Hannibal and the towns below for the purpose of arousing the Missourians. The excitement in our city is intense and the anxiety to hear the fate of Gov. Ford and his men are very great.


LATER.

Death of Joe Smith Confirmed.

We were confident from the manner in which the death of Smith was announced that it was true, notwithstanding many doubted and pronounced it a hoax. The following extracts are from the St. Louis New Era of the 29th, an evening paper: --

MORE MORMON NEWS. -- From passengers and officers of the steamboat Dove, we learn that on yesterday a messenger from Governor Ford arrived at Rushville calling on the militia to march speedily to Carthage to resist an attack apprehended from the Mormons. He stated that about 5 o'clock on the 27th, a mob of two hundred men, armed, painted and disguised, came to Carthage, demanded the key of the jail, and took out Joe Smith, Hiram Smith, and William [sic] Richards and shot them forthwith. They were fearful that the Mormons would retaliate this murder by burning Carthage and Warsaw. Several hundred of the militia were about to march from Schuyler county when the Dove left. The Governor's message arrived at Rushville about 12 o'clock. Those who came down on the boat consider this news as authentic. If true, it is both alarming and disgraceful. It was cruel and cowardly to murder unarmed prisoners when they had surrendered themselves and were in the custody of the laws. They were under the protection of the laws; the word of the Governor and the faith of the State were pledged to protect them from mobs and to secure to them a fair trial.

An [extra] from the Alton Telegraph contains letters from G. T. M. Davis, from which we learn that the two Smith, Richards, and also Phelps, a Mormon, were killed by the mob at Carthage. Three citizens of Hancock county were wounded in the attack on the jail, their names were Mills, Galagher, and Vorhees. Mr. Davis apprehended great violence, and feared an indiscriminate extermination of the Mormon population. He was endeavoring to allay it, and Gov. Ford was trying to restrain Mormons and the populace.

LATEST ACCOUNTS FROM NAUVOO. -- The Mendota left Nauvoo yesterday at 4 o'clock. The Captain says he staid at Nauvoo several hours and talked with a number of the Mormons; that whilst there a body of Mormons came in bearing the dead bodies of Joe Smith and Hiram Smith. Mr. Phelps was not killed, but was in Nauvoo when the Mendota left, making a speech to the Mormons, and advising them to peace. No Mormons were killed except Joe and Hiram Smith. The Mormons all expressed a determination to keep the peace, and not to resort to arms except in necessary self-defence.

They state that at Carthage the Mormons were confined; that about fifty or one hundred men disguised suddenly rushed on the jail house; that the guard fired on them and wounded three of them; that the men in disguise fired into the jail and killed Hiram Smith before the door was opened. Joe Smith had a revolving pistol, and fired it two or three times without effect, bit was himself soon killed by the assailants, that Taylor, the editor of the Nauvoo Neighbor, was in jail, and was shot through the thigh, but not seriously injured; Richards was not injured. After the assault the disguised mob retreated, and it was not even known who they were. The guard consisted of fifty men, left by the Governor, of whom eight or ten were on duty when the attack was made on the jail house.

Note: Part of the introductory article was also published in the July 8, 1844 issue of the Washington Daily National Intelligencer. The "slip" from the Quincy Herald was reprinted in numerous papers, including the Richmond Inquirer of July 9, 1844, etc.


 



Vol. 1 - No. 3.                             Pittsburgh, July 12, 1844.                           Price 2 cts.


THE  MURDER  OF  JOE  SMITH.

The Louisville Journal of July 3d, says: "We have seen a gentleman who was in Nauvoo on Friday, and who informs us that all was quiet there, the prominent Mormons exhorting their followers to offer no insult or molestation to any one, and in no case to offer violence except in strict self-defence. The deepest grief and affliction pervaded the city. There appeared to be no danger of the burning of Warsaw or Carthage."

The Cincinnatti Gazette of July 4th, states that the reports about the Mormons, and the death of Joe Smith and his brother are various and contradictory. A traveler just from the scene, of apparent candor and truth, gives the following account of the death of the prophet:

"He was left in prison, with Hiram at Carthage, and a guard of sixty men placed over them by order of Gov. Ford. -- The Guard, except about eight, had left their position at the Jail, when a mob disguised in dress and painted black in the faces, rushed into the Jail, shot Hiram dead, and then killed Joe. No resistance was made by either. Joe was leaning or sitting upon a window when shot; he fell from it exclaiming, My God! My God! and died, -- After he reached the ground he was stabbed, apparently by a young man, in the breast, who said 'Damn you; take that; you killed my father,'"

We give this as we receive it without being able to vouch for its correctness. -- We shall probably get at the truth in a day or two. --   zAge.


Note: This was the final issue of The Peoples' Organ. Its editor, Apostle John E. Page, had been summoned back to Nauvoo by Joseph Smith on June 20th but was unable to respond to that order prior to Smith's assassination on June 29th. Oddly enough, Apostle Page did not accompany President Sidney Rigdon back to Nauvoo when Rigdon left Pittsburgh near the end of July, 1844. Rigdon had initially called for a conference of the Twelve Apostles to meet at Pittsburgh that month and it is possible that he left Page behind with instructions to carry out plans for that conference, should any of his fellow apostles respond to the call. By the time Rigdon arrived back in Pittsburgh, from his unsuccessful attempt to seize power over the Church in Illinois, Page was wavering in his support for the unstable (and recently excommunicated) Mormon leader. Page initially submitted to the authority of the Twelve in a meeting with Apostle Orson Hyde at Cincinnatti. Although he moved his family from Pittsburgh to Nauvoo at the end of 1844, Page's fealty to the Twelve was short-lived. According to his biography in the RLDS History of the Church, he "was one of the three members of his quorum who protested against the action of the majority of the Twelve and refused to countenance their proceedings."


 


THE  WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 38.                      Washington, Pa., Saturday, July 13, 1844.                      No. 1.



Joe and Hiram Smith are Dead!

The steamboat Boreas, just arrived from Warsaw, brings shocking intelligence from the scene of the Mormon war. The following slip from the office of the Warsaw Signal, explains the dreadful tragedy:

"Joe and Hiram Smith are dead -- shot this afternoon. An attack from the Mormons is expected every hour. Will not the surrounding counties rush instantly to our rescue?
Warsaw, June 27, 1844."

From the Quincy Herald.

It seems that the circumstances attending the killing of the Mormon Prophet and his brother Hiram are as follows: On yesterday Gov. Ford left Carthage with about 120 soldiers for the purpose of taking possession of the "Nauvoo Legion" and their arms. They arrived at Nauvoo about noon, and called for the assembling of the Legion. About 2000 men with arms immediately responded to its call. These troops were put under command of Col. Singleton, of Brown county, who accompanied Gov. Ford to Nauvoo.

The Governor finding all quiet, left Nauvoo about 5 o’clock P.M., with a company of 60 men for the purpose of encamping about seven miles from the city.

At about the same time that Governor Ford left Nauvoo, the Prophet and his brother were killed at Carthage, under the following circumstances, as near as we can ascertain them:

Joe and Hiram were both confined in the debtor’s room of the Carthage jail awaiting their trial on a charge of treason. The jail was strongly guarded by soldiers and anti-Mormons, who had been placed there by the Governor.

A Mormon attempted to rush by the guard for the purpose of forcing his way into the jail. He was opposed by the guard, and fired a pistol at one of the guard, giving him a slight wound.

A general confusion ensued in the crowd around the jail. Joe and his Mormon fellow prisoners, it seems, had provided themselves with pistols, and commenced firing upon the guard within. He then attempted to escape from the window, when a hundred balls entered his body, and he fell a lifeless corpse.

His brother Hiram shared the same fate. -- Richards, a leading Mormon, was badly wounded. There our intelligence ends. What took place after this, God only knows. Mormons immediately left for Nauvoo to carry the news of the death of the Prophet. It is feared that the Mormons at Nauvoo will be so exasperated as to exterminate the Governor and his small force.

The Boreas brought down most of the women and children from Warsaw. It is feared their town is in ashes before this.

Our citizens were aroused this morning by the ringing of bells and a call to arms. Our 3 independent companies are already in marching order. Major Flood has ordered out the militia of this regiment, and the steamer Boreas is waiting to convey them to the scene of action.

There is no knowing where this dreadful affair will end. Many have expressed fears that our city is in danger, because most of the Warsaw families have taken refuge here; but we believe there is no danger; we are too far from the scene of action.

Messengers have just left for Hannibal and the towns below for the purpose of arousing the Missourians. The excitement in our city is intense, and the anxiety to hear the fate of Gov. Ford and his men is very great. We shall issue a Bulletin on receipt of the next news.



Warsaw, 27th June -- 9 P.M.         
Editors Missouri Republican: -- The Tyrant is dead! This afternoo, between the hours of 5 and 6 o'clock, an armed multitude visited the jail at Carthage, bore off the guard, and killed Joseph and Hyrum Smith. Report says two of Joe's associates in confinement were likewise destroyed. The Governor had left Carthage in the morning for Nauvoo, with 50 dragoons, for the purpose of securing the balance of the State arms remaining at Nauvoo, and during his absence this scene occurred.

It is to be deeply lamented that this should have occurred; but the people were driven to desperation at the thought of having again this monster at large in the community. Our citizens are arming and will be prepared to resist any attempt that may be made on their lives or property. Jose has many friends that will attempt to seek vengeance, but they will be foiled, for our people are resolute and determined to maintain their rights at all hazards.
                                          Respectfully, __________.


Note: The above article was evidently copied from the Missouri Republican of June 28th or 29th -- neither issue has yet been located for transcription.


 


THE  BEAVER  ARGUS.

Vol. XX.                             Beaver, Pa., Wednesday,   July 17, 1844.                           No. 29.

 

--> From St. Louis we have papers to July 6. All was quiet at Warsaw and Nauvoo at last accounts. The flame is not quenched, however, and will work again before long --


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TIOGA  [   ]  EAGLE.

Vol. VI.                        Wellsborough, Pa., Wednesday, July 24, 1844.                           No. 48.



The Murder of Joe Smith.

The St. Louis New Era, alluding to the murder of Joe Smith and his brother, remarks that "it is a another flagrant instance of the triumph of a mob spirit in this country. -- To murder prisoners in cold hood when there is nothing to prevent their being punished to the full extett of their crimes according to law, is utterly inexcusable. But when a mob is once raised and excited, it knows no bounds, no moderation, but reason and law are both disregarded. We have often expressed the belief that mobs and Lynch law are improper under all circumstances, and should not be justified, excused or tolerated under any circumstances, and every outbreak confirms the correctness of this opinion. Joe Smith, was no-doubt, deeply steeped in crime; but when he was under arrest, with public sentiment setting strongly against him, there was the most ample opporturiity to convict and punish him legally and severely."



The Mormons.

The people of Nauvoo have held a meeting at which resolutions, of a specific character were passed. One, in the following words: --

Resolved further, to secure the peace, friendship and happiness of the people, and allay the excitement that now exists, we will reprobate private revenge on the assassins of Generals Joseph and Hiram Smith by any of the latter Day'Saints; that instead of an appeal to arms we appeal to the majesty of the laws, and will be content with whatever judgment it shall award; and should the law fail, we leave the matter with God!

Another of the Resolutions declares that they entertain no design whatever of making an attack upon the citizens of other towns in the neighborhood, and invites the citizens of those towns as friends and neighbors to use the Savior's Golden Rule, "to do unto others as they would have others do unto them."

A new prophet, it is said, has been selected at Nauvoo, a Dr. Richards, formerly of Massachusetts. He is said to be a man of considerable talent, with much shrewdness and tact. The Philadelphia Mercury remarks, that some people think that Mormonism virtually expired with its founder Joe Smith. We have a contrary opinion. A religious humbug generally flourishes the better after the death of its founder. In these times, it is much easier for people to have faith in a dead saint than a living one; the first is not so liable to be found out, even if he was an impostor. While a pseudo-saint or prophet is still alive -- has a difficult game to play and a little indiscretion will, sometime betray him. Joe Smith was almost an exploded humbug; he died in very good time to prevent his creed from becoming the victim of its author's crimes and frailties.

(The city of Nauvoo, is situated on the east side of the Mississippi river, at the head of what is called the "Lower Rapids," and about 140 miles above St Louis. The situation is one of the most desirable on the upper Mississippi; being elevated and rather level. The houses are very much scattered, covering a considerable quantity of land. -- The place contains a number of splendid public, buildings. The Temple, if ever finished, will be one of the greatest buildings in the west -- the cost of which is estimated at $3,000,000. The number of inhabitants as reported, is between 4000 and 5000.)



THE MORMONS. -- The Baltimore Patriot says that a number of Mormons assembled in Baltimore, agreeably to appointment, on Saturday, and have decided, on account of the death of their leader, Joe Smith, to make no movement in the Presidential question. A wise conclusion.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II.                       Pittsburgh, Pa.,  Thursday,  August 29, 1844.                      No. 297.

 

From Nauvoo.-- We have intelligence from Nauvoo to the 5th inst. All was quiet. It appears that the reports of the appearance of Joe Smith and the appointment of his son as prophet are false, and originated in a desire to injure the Mormons abroad. -- Sidney Rigdon had returned to Nanvoo from Pitttburg, and preached to the people on the 4th inst. In consequence of the death of Samuel Smith, Joe's brother, since the murder of the prophet, Sidney Rigdon will be chosen Patriarch of the Mormon flock. He is their master spirit, and will make a shrewd and energetic leader. There are five widows of the Smith family family now living in Nauvoo; the mother of all, and the late wives of Joe, Hiram, and their two brothers. -- Accessions to the Mormon strength continue to be quite large. In Nauvoo the usual activity is apparent, and the Temple is steadily going up in its uniqe form and shape. Its style of architecture is of the pure Mormon order.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II.                       Pittsburgh, Pa.,  Thursday,  September 5, 1844.                      No. 303.

 

Items from Nauvoo. -- We clip the following from the Warsaw Signal:

Daniel Spencer has been elected Mayor, pro tem.

George Miller and Whitney have been elected Trustees in trust for the church property. Under their management, the funds being honestly appropriated and not embezzled, as in Joe's time, the Temple is progressing rapidly.

Sidney Rigdon, who claimed the leadership of the church, on the ground of his being the only survivor of the Firt Presidency, and also, on the ground of his having been named by Joe at one time, as his successor, has had his claims rejected by the Twelve, who have decided not to have any man for leader, but that the church shall be governed by them collectively.

Samuel H. Smith died in Nauvoo, about two weeks since; William is now the only surviving brother of the Prophet.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. III.                       Pittsburgh, Pa.,  Thursday,  September 19, 1844.                       No. 9.



MORMON  NEWS.

The Warsaw Signal, keeps, apparently, a pretty keen eye upon the Mormons at Nauvoo. That paper says that Lyman Wright [sic], one of the leaders of the Mormons, has left Nauvoo for the pine regions of the Wisconsin, with about two hundred followers, comprising the most reckless of the Mormon community.

Sidney Rigdon is said to have left for Pittsburgh, and it is added that a great number of the English will soon follow him.

Dissensions are said to exist among the Mormon leaders. Mrs. Smith, the widow of Joseph Smith, is accused of withholding the transfer of property belonging to the Church, held in Joe Smith's name. There was a rumor that she had purchased property at Hampton, where Law and the seceders reside.

Brigham Young preached a sermon at Nauvoo last Sunday, in which he is said to have avowed the spiritual wife doctrine -- a matter which has been charged upon, and denied by them.

The Temple is going ahead with astonishing rapidity, a great portion of the population being employed upon it. The leaders prophesy the reappearance of Joe to consecrate and dedicate it to the Lord, and to hasten this event, the poor fanatics are exercising themselves to the utmost.

Many persons are leaving Nauvoo, and others would leave if they could dispose of their property. At a meeting of the Mormons in the Bear Creek settlement, week before last, they resolved to quit the country.

Gen. John C. Bennett passed up the river a few days since, to Hampton. St. Louis Republican.


Note: The above material was taken from the Warsaw Signal of the Sept. 4, 1844.


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  Sept. 25, 1844.                                 No. 1.


 

MORMON NEWS. -- The last Nauvoo Neighbor says that the hand of fellowship has been withdrawn from Elders Rigdon. James Emmitt and Zachariah Wilson. The Warsaw Signal says it was rumored, that on Saturday week last, nineteen of the leading Mormons were ejected from the church, among them, John Forge [sic - John A. Forges?] and Emmit [sic - Emma?] Smith. The Temple is still going ahead, the third tier of windows being ready to receive their caps. Above them, is to be a belt of course stone, and then six feet of plain cut stone work, will finish the walls.

The Signal says, that twenty-five Mormon families have left Bear Creek, taking with them several horses, valued at $700, and many head of cattle, which they had stolen; they had gone to Nauvoo. The Mormons were also leaving Morley's settlement.

Serious dissentions are said to exist in the church. Rigdon has about four hundred followers, who admit his claim to the leadership, and deny the right of the Twelve to govern -- of this number, are Edward Hawley and Robert Price.



THE MORMONS. -- The Warsaw Signal says, that Daniel Spencer, has been elected Mayor of Nauvoo, pro tem.; George Miller and Whitney have been elected trustees of the church property, and under this management, the Temple is progressing rapidly. Samuel H. Smith, brother of the Prophet, died in Nauvoo about two weeks since. William is now the only surviving brother. Sidney Rigdon, who claimed the leadership of the church on the ground of his being the only survivor of the first Presidency, and also, on the ground of his having been named by Joe at one time, as his successor, has had his claims rejected by the Twelve, who have decided not to have any one man for leader, but that the church shall be governed by them collectively.



STARTLING DISCLOSURES. -- Joseph H. Jackson, recently a Mormon, in the [inmost confidence] of the great Impostor Smith, has published an expose of his (Smith's) villainy and black-heartedness, which makes the blood curdle to read. If but the tenth part of his allegations are true, the "Prophet" was as unfit to live [as] to die.



OUR  PAPER.

We have our first number a short time in advance of the completion of our arrangements, that our friends and the public may have before them a specimen of the paper, which we propose to publish. We will not issue the second number until the first Wednesday of November, after which time the paper will be published regularly on Wednesday of every successive week. We avail ourselves of this interval between the publication of the first and second number to finish our printing arrangements; and to obtain returns of subscribers in the hands of agents, that our readers may be furnished with the paper from the commencement of the volume.



TO  SUBSCRIBERS.

We send this first number of our paper to each of the former subscribers to the "Carthage Evangelist," as this is a substitute for that publication. We earnestly request all who shall not wish to become subscribers, to return this number forthwith, by mail, directed to us, as we shall forward the paper regularly to all who fail to do so. Those subscribers to the "Carthage Evangelist," who have paid in advance will be supplied with this paper, and charged the additional price, unless they order otherwise by returning the paper as directed above.



TO  OUR  READERS.

The present is a crisis of hope and fear. Men are not satisfied with the ordinary life. Their eyes are on the future. They demand extra excitement, and keep solemn vigils with reference to unknown events looked, if not longed for, with marked impatience. They exclaim what next? Our brethren are among them; and are imbued with the inquietude and inquisitiveness of the age. They know that reading is the food of the mind, and they crave it. They seek to have at regular intervals a supply of religious information with the current political news of our own and foreign nations. We offer them the "PROTESTANT UNIONIST."

After an absence of many years we have in the course of divine providence returned to Pittsburgh. This is a great emporium and center of trade and manufactures, and a point from which may be distributed with as much facility as any other city in the west, every thing in literature and religion which it is befitting our brethren to understand.

These facts of time, place and other circumstances concur with our design, as indicated in the Protestant Unionist.

Myself and colleagues have only to request all our brethren, our acquaintances, and particularly the subscribers of the Evangelist, to favor and further its interest. Will you give us your personal support. We have given our youth and manhood to the cause. We desire for Christ's sake, and your sake, to devote it to our ago, also. Go on then, my brethren, and procure us subscribers, and we will by the help of our Lord be up to our duty.
SEN. ED.      


Note: Elder Walter Scott (the senior editor) makes little reference to his previous tenure as a Christian pastor in Pittsburgh. The circumstances of his 1825 departure from that city are not explained -- he says only: "After an absence of many years we have in the course of divine providence returned to Pittsburgh..."


 


SUNBURY  AMERICAN.
AND  SHAMOKIN  JOURNAL.

Vol. V.                       Sunbury, Pa., Saturday,  September 28, 1844.                       No. 1.



A Vision at Nauvoo.

Though Joe Smith is dead, the gift of prophecy remains with some of his followers, who seem to exercise it as Joe did, for their own advantage. Sidney Rigdon has had a quarrel with the twelve and they have cut him off from the Church. He threatens to come out with an exposition, and professes to have had a vision, in which it was shown him all that would transpire to the winding-up scene. He says he has received the keys of David, spoken of in the third chapter of the Revelation, which shutteth and no man openeth, and openeth and no man shutteth. It has been shown to him that the temple will not be finished, and in less than four years there will be blood shed: about this time the saints will fight the first great battle at Chambersburg, in Pennsylvania; the second at Harrisburg; third at Philadelphia; fourth, at Baltimore; fifth, at Washington; sixth, at Richmond; seventh, at New York; eighth at Boston: ninth, on the Hudson: tenth and last on this continent, at Monmouth, New Jersey, in which they will defeat the forces of Queen Victoria; take the shipping that brought over her army, and pass over in divisions, to England, France and Spain, and finally complete the conquest of the world; and fight the battles of Gog and Magog at Jerusalem, when the Saviour will appear, which will be in about eleven years from this time. Sidney says the keys he holds are above those held by Joseph. He has ordained several prophets, who are not to leave Nauvoo at present, but that a sign will be given them when to leave, so that they may assemble and take command of the army. If they have so grand a warlike job to perform, they had better begin soon. It will take some time to carry out this design of universal conquest.   Philadelphia Ledger.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. III.                       Pittsburgh, Pa.,  Monday,  September 30, 1844.                       No. 18.



Mormon News. -- The last Nauvoo Neighbor says that the hand of friendship has been withsrawn from Elders Rigdon, James Emmitt, and Zachariah Wilson. The Warsaw Signal says it was rumored, that on Saturday week last, nineteen of the leading Mormons were ejected from the church, among them John A. Forge and Emma Smith. The Temple is still going ahead, the third tier of windows being ready to receive their caps. Above them, is to be a belt of course stone, and then six feet of plain cut stone work, will finish the walls.

The Signal says, that twenty-five Mormon families have left Bear Creek, taking with them several horses, valued at $700, and many head of cattle, which they had stolen; they had gone to Nauvoo. The Mormons were also leaving Morley's settlement.

Serious dissentions are said to exist in the church. Rigdon has about 400 followers, who admit his claim to the leadership, and deny the right of the Twelve to govern; of this number are Edward Hawley and Robert Price.

John P. Green, Marshal of Nauvoo, died last week.
           St. Louis Repub., Sept. 16.


Note:


 


THE  BEAVER  ARGUS.

Vol. XX.                           Beaver, Pa., Wednesday,   October 2, 1844.                         No. ?



THE  MORMON.

This is to say to all my friends, and the friends of the 'Everlasting Gospel' of Jesus Christ, that I am at leisure to wait on them, in any place, in the ministry of the gospel, where there is the greatest door open for doing the most good in my capacity, this one thing considered, I must settle my family in that part of the country that becomes the field of my labor. All communications addressed to me -- in Brighton, Beaver Co., Pa. Post paid -- will be duly attended to.
Respectfully,           JOHN E. PAGE.          


Note 1: John E. Page's next known published communication was printed in the Nov. 20, 1844 issue of Elder Walter Scott's Pittsburgh paper, The Protestant Unionist. And, although he had not yet returned to Nauvoo, in his November notice Page was once again representing himself as being a loyal Apostle of the Mormon Church: he signed that communication, "one of the Twelve traveling high council of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints." As late as Sept. 16, 1845 Page's apostolic signature was subscribed to a "proposition from the Twelve Elders of the Mormon Church at Nauvoo."

Note 2: The 1844 Beaver Argus news item was Elder Page's last act documented in the 1858 Deseret News summary of his Mormon career, and seems to have been considered as marking his final break with the Nauvoo church. He was disfellowshipped and removed from Quorum of the Twelve in February of 1846 and four months later was fully excommunicated, after transferring his loyalty to James J. Strang. See John Quist's "John E. Page: An Apostle of Uncertainty" in the Journal of Mormon History 12 (1985): 53–68.


 


Vol. XII.                    Thursday  Afternoon,  October  3, 1844.                        No. 50.

 

ANOTHER MORMON WAR. -- An express arrived in town on Wednesday evening last, bearing an order from Gov. Ford to the officers of the militia in this and neighboring counties, commanding them to call out a portion of their forces and march to places of rendezvous, which he mentioned, in the counties bordering upon Nauvoo. The reason assigned for this is that the citizens of Hancock and the surrounding counties, intend holding a large wolf hunt, and it is feared an attack upon Nauvoo is cloaked beneath this avowed intention. -- Jackson City Journal.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Tuesday  Afternoon,  October 8, 1844.                         No. 54.



From the St. Louis New Era, Sept. 28.

THE MORMON WAR. -- Our accounts of the movements of Gov. Ford and his army, by the boats which have arrived to-day from the Upper Mississippi and Illinois, are quite imperfect and uncertain. Those from the vicinity of Warsaw confirm the report which was received here yesterday of the flight of Sharp, the editor of the Warsaw Signal, and Col. Williams. The officers of the Boreas learned at Warsaw, as she passed down, that there were from one hundred to three hundred of Gov. Ford's soldiers at Carthage, but the exact designs or principal features of this military campaign does not seem to be rightly understood, even by those for whose express benefit it was gotten up, and as Gov. Ford has chosen to keep the matter pretty much to himself, we will have to wait patiently until he accomplishes something. It is said that he is trying to arrest and bring to justice the murderers of the Smiths. If this is his sole object, and he thinks it will take from one to two thousand troops to do it, why keep them at Rushville, or scattered over the country.


From the Warsaw Signal of the 25th.

Just as our paper was going to press this morning, a man came into our office, and said that he had a writ for me. Well, sir, let me see it. He produced the paper, which proved to be a warrant for the murder of Joe and Hyrum Smith, issued by Aaron Johnson, Justice of the Peace in Nauvoo. After reading, I told the officer that if my friends said go, I would go, if not, I would stand fast. Accordingly I went out, and conversed with the citizens, and unanimously they said don't go. I then told the officer that he could return and report progress, but I could not go with him, for I was not to be singled out as the sole object of Mormon vengeance. Now, gentle reader, I did not help to kill Joe Smith, for I did not go to the jail, with those who killed him. If my influence helped to produce the state of feeling that resulted in his death, why I am in common with some hundred others, guilty -- not of murder, but of an extra judicial execution. I have the most satisfactory proof that Joe Smith threatened my life, and sought to take it; if I had, therefore, killed him I should only have acted in self-defence. The writ only included Col. Williams and myself. Thus it will appear that it is not the guilty, but those most obnoxious to the Latter Day Saints, who are to be selected as victims. The officer, who is deputy Sheriff, says that his orders are to arrest and return the prisoners to the Sheriff, in Carthage, from thence I suppose I am to be taken to Nauvoo; but I will not go to Nauvoo unless my fellow citizens say so. I did not resist the officer, but my friends asvised me not to go, and the officer did not call on any of the citizens to aid him in taking me. After I told him I would not go, he troubled me no further.

Fellow-citizens, shall we submit?
                                  THOMAS C. SHARP.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Afternoon,  October  10, 1844.                         No. 56.



Mormon Difficulties -- The officers of the steamer Monona from the Upper Mississippi report, that it was said at Warsaw that Governor Ford was encamped in the vicinity of Nauvoo, with about 1500 men. All things were quiet at Nauvoo and Warsaw, but it was thought that if the Governor attempted to forcibly arrest any of the persons suspected to be concerned in the murder of the Smiths a conflict would ensue. -- The Governor had sent a message to Quincy, the purport of which was not known. -- St. Louis Republic. Oct. 1.



By the Monona, which arrived this morning, we have the latest intelligence from Nauvoo and Gov. Ford's army. The M. left Nauvoo night before last; Gov. Ford, with the principal portion of his forces, was then encamped on the outskirts of the city. Persons on board the boat distinctly heard the report of musketry and the strains of martial music, when several miles distant, on their approach to the city. An express or bearer of dispatches was sent down on board the M. to Quincy from his excellency; the subject or nature of the message was not ascertained. The Quincy Volunteers had arrived at Nauvoo before the M. passed. Every effort was made on the part of the officers of the boat, while at Nauvoo, to ascertain the Governor's next movement, but without success; to their oft repeated inquiries, put to the citizens and others, they received but one answer, which was that he was 'thar,' "well what is he going to do" the universal cry was we don't know. Some of the companies had been at Nauvoo two or three days previous to the M's passing. All was quiet at Warsaw, which place she left yesterday about noon. Sharp, Williams, and a portion of Joe Smith's guard at Carthage, had taken up their quarters at Churchville, on the Missouri side of the river. When the M. landed at Warsaw she was boarded by hundreds of anxious citizens inquiring after the news from Nauvoo.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


The Commercial Journal and
Spirit of the Age.

Vol. ?                             Pittsburgh, Sunday  Oct. 10, 1844.                             No. ?.


                  From the Morning Chronicle.

HO!  THE  MORMONS.

==> Notice is hereby given to the public to beware of receiving the ordinance of Baptism at the hands of Mr. Sidney Rigdon, Esq., or any of his adherents, thinking to attach themselves to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints -- for Mr. S. Rigdon is at this time expelled from the aforesaid Church, and all his adherents are suspended from the performance or administration of any ordinance whatever, until they repent and adhere to the proper authorities of the said Church. For whatever Mr. S. Rigdon, or his adherents may say, or do, under the pretention or nominal name of Latter Day Saints, in a legal point of light, will be no more in connection with the true Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, than the Republic of the United States has with the Crown of England.
JOHN E. PAGE, Elder,      
And one of the Twelve travelling high council of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.


Note: The above notice apparently was first published in the Pittsburgh Morning Chronicle of Thursday, Oct. 7th. See notes attached to report in the Oct. 11th Gazette & Advertiser for more comments.


 


Vol. XII.                     Friday  Afternoon,  October 11, 1844.                         No. 57.



From the St. Louis New Era.

Latest News from the Seat of War.

By the arrival of the Boreas, we are put in possession of a letter from a correspondent at Churchville, which gives the latest intelligence from Gov. Ford and the Mormon War:

CHURCHVILLE, Sept. 28th, 1844.    

Mr. Editor: -- Since my last, Gov. Ford, with the forces under his command, has been to Nauvoo, where they encamped night before last, and there remained until this morning. Yesterday, the Nauvoo Legion was paraded, but made but a very poor impression on the Governor's troops. I have the most satisfactory information, that the Mormons were very distrustful of the Governor, and were much alarmed -- because of the hostile disposition manifested towards them by the troops individually.

Last night while the guard was being relieved, at the camp of the Governor, one of the Springfield cadets was accidently shot in consequence of a false alarm purposely given to try the men; he died instantly. His name is Norris. So this silly movement of the Governor has been the death of one estimable citizen, and God only knows but that the lives of hundreds are yet to be sacrificed because of it.

Yesterday, most of the men apprehending arrests came over to this side of the river, and still remain here. Many who came over had no hand whatever in the mob who killed Smith. To-day Ford's troops marched to Warsaw, and are now encamped there. They number 420 in all -- being the whole number that the Governor could raise out of 2,500 ordered out; and from various authentic sources we learn that four fifths, at least, of these would mutiny if ordered to assist in making arrests. Some of the officers have been over here, and are very friendly, and as good anti-Mormons as any of us. They commend the course of the citizens as a discreet one, and say that in all probability they will be gone to-morrow, when all hands can return home. There have been no more arrests. The fact is, the Sheriff is so cowardly that he has not courage to make them. -- Report says that there are 70 writs out, and that rewards are offered for Sharp, Williams and Jackson.

If any man is taken to Nauvoo, I am greatly mistaken, if there is not the tallest mob raised, that the West has ever seen. The whole country around will rise en masse, and march to the rescue. It is useless to reason this matter, -- the feeling is in the people, and Gov. Ford can't whip it out. He professes great anxiety to punish mobbers, but in the attempt to do so, he will only aggravate the evil; and it seems to me the height of folly to try the virtue of the law, when the inevitable result will be a further and more dangerous violation of it.

Ford seems to make this a personal matter, his greatest antipathy being against certain individuals who are not afraid to express their opinions of him and his cause. Well, he may spend his wrath -- he is perfectly harmless so long as the vox populi is against him. The game is between him and the people; if he can head them; he is a better man than the world generally give[s] him credit for being.

The men on this side of the river are encamped, and spend their time very agreeably in hunting and fishing. They live cheap and easy, and feel but little incommoded by the Governor's movements.
                                  CLARKE.




SCHISM AMONG THE MORMONS. -- Elder Page of this city, one of the "high travelling council of twelve," has issued his manifesto, warning all Mormons, and all who wish to become Mormons, against Sidney Rigdon, who it seems has been expelled from the company of the "Saints."


Note 1: The LDS "manifesto" mentioned in the "Schism" item was apparently first published in the Pittsburgh Morning Chronicle of Oct. 7th. It was reprinted in the Oct. 10th Spirit of the Age, and from there, made its way into Sidney Rigdon's Messenger & Advocate of Dec. 2, 1844.

Note 2: The notice by LDS Apostle John E. Page, directed against his former ecclesiastical superior, Sidney Rigdon, marked a formal break between the two. At about this same time word must have reached Page from Nauvoo that he had been sustained in his office as one of the Twelve Apostles of the Church. Practically nothing is known of the battle that went on between Rigdon and Page for the loyalty of the Pennsylvania Mormons, but Rigdon seems to have bested his apostolic rival, in Pittsburgh at least. In a letter dated Oct. 15, 1844, published in his Pittsburgh Messenger & Advocate of the same date, "President" Sidney Rigdon says: "I have been informed, since Mr. Page published his Bull, and subsequent departure from this place, that he had attempted to teach the doctrine of spiritual wives in this city some time since. This will account for his sudden departure from both this place [Pittsburgh] and yours [Brighton]..."


 


Vol. XII.                         Tuesday  October 15, 1844.                             No. 60.


 

END OF THE THIRD MORMON WAR. -- A correspondent of the St. Louis Republican, writing from near Quincy, Illinois, under date of the 30th ult., gives the following account of the termination of Governor Ford's recent disgraceful campaign.

The war is ended and the troops are en route for home. To-day the Governor held a treaty with the individuals against whom the writs had been issued for being engaged in the killing of the Smiths, and after some considerable negotiation, the matter was finally settled to the satisfaction of all concerned. Col. Williams and Thos. C. Sharpe, Esq., agreed to surrender if they could be taken to Quincy for their examination. -- This was agreed to on the part of the Governor. Further, they were to have an escort to protect them while in the custody of the officer. If sufficient evidence was adduced to warrant the judge to commit for trial, the prisoners were to give moderate bail for their appearance at court. If an indictment is then found, they are to have a continuance and a change of venue. This all might have been accomplished without calling out twenty five hundred militia, if the Governor had taken the proper steps in the first instance.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


THE  WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 38.                      Washington, Pa., Saturday, October 19, 1844.                      No. 15.



DISSOLUTION  OF  THE
MORMON  CHURCH.

Through the politeness of a friend, we have received the following manifesto, of a portion of the Mormons in regard to the successorship of the impostor, Joe Smith. -- The elements of discord and disunion are successfully at work in the community at work in the community at Nauvoo; and no doubt rests upon our minds, but that the total dissolution of the Church will be the inevitable result. Factions may spring up among them, and some unprincipled and ambitious leader seek to set himself on the throne of power so firmly established by Joe Smith for his own base purposes. But every such attempt, will, as heretofore, result in a failure. -- With the fall of the mock "PROPHET," fell also the throne of despotism he had erected in this Republic, and the charm that enabled him to delude the populace has, with his death, departed, we trust forever.
_____

To the Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints:

It becomes an imperative obligation devolving upon the friends and adherants of Pres. Sidney Rigdon, to make an explicit and candid statement of the causes which have led to their disunion and disfellowship with the adherents of the Twelve. in their illegal and unwarrentable assumption of the authority of their first Presidency.

It is well known to every well informed member of the Church, that the law, organization, and government of said Church is contained in the book of Doctrine and Covenants, as received through Joseph Smith by revelation. By reference to that book we find that the Church is governed by the Presidents of the High Priesthood, appointed by Revelation, whose duty is to preside over the whole Church, the Twelve being subordinate to that authority, and acting under its direction.

The melancholy catastrophe of the murder of Joseph Smith, the presiding President and Hyrum, his brother, resulted in having one individual only known to the Church as pointed out by repeated Revelations, as holding the Presidency and Keys of this last Kingdom, as Prophet, Seer and Revelator for the Church, viz: Sydney Rigdon.

President Rigdon, who was then in Pittsburgh, received instruction from the Lord to repair to [this] place and present himself to the Church for their acceptancere or rejection; which actually did result in his rejection, and the appointment of the Twelve (by a large majority of the Church) to the Presidency of the Church and its entire control.

Verily believing, as we do, that this was a vital departure from the order of Heaven, and a rejection of the only man who sustained the legal relation of a Revelator to the Church, and who was competent to reorganize the first Presidency, we dissented and lifted our voices against such proceedings, and manifested our adherence to President Rigdon.

In consequence of this rejection, President Rigdon has received a commandment to reorganize the Church -- and for this reason the Twelve and their adherents have assiduously studied and striven to misrepresent the character and designs of President Rigdon and his friends; and have not scrupled to ascribe to them motives and designs the most base and dishonorable.

We do declare that Pres. Rigdon is above all malevolent aspirations of his reputation, and is known to us as a worthy, law-abiding citizen, and a gentleman of unblemished character.

We do moreover declare our sincere conviction, that in rejecting Sidney Rigdon, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, no longer exists, except in connection with him; and that God has given no authority for an organization of the Church differing from that contained in the book of Doctrine and Covenants.

Heretofore, the accused, has had the privilege of trial, and opportunity to reply to the charges brought against them; but on the memorable 8th day of September, 1844, this privilege was denied in open and flagrant violation of all the laws and rules of the Church; thus manifesting clearly that the course they have pursued towards us, is one unsanctioned by law, and unhallowed by justice.

Signed by -- Sam'l James, Wm. Richards, Leon. Soby, Geo. Morey, J. B. Bosworth, Sam'l Bennett, George W. Grouse, J. A. Forgeus, David Scott -- and many others.
             Nauvoo, Sept. 8, 1844.




Note: Although President Sidney was well known to the old-timers of Washington County, Pennsylvania, no further mention of him occurs in the local newspapers of this period.


 



TIOGA  [   ]  EAGLE.

Vol. ?                        Wellsborough, Pa., Wednesday, October 30, 1844.                           No. ?


 

WHO IS JOE SMITH'S MOTHER. -- It is stated that Mrs. Joseph Smith, senior, mother of Joe, the Prophet, was born in Montague, Mass., is 63 years old, and her maiden name was Lucy Mack. Her father kept for several years the tavern in Montague, known afterwards as the "Gunn Tavern," and afterwards kept a public house in Keene, N. H. She also for a time before her marriage lived with a relation in South Hadley.


Note 1: The above excerpt was taken from a much longer article, published in the Oct. 14, 1844 issue of the Springfield Daily Evening Republican.

Note 2: Luck Mack Smith's parents moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, in 1779, when she was about four years old. Gunn's Tavern was established in about 1726, south of town near the intersection of Sunderland Road and N. Leverett Road. The previous tavern-keeeper, before the Solomon Mack family arrived, appears to have been Eliphalet Allis. Lucy's sister Lovisa died in a Montague tavern -- see Mack's 1811 Narrative, page 44 and Anderson's Lucy's Book, page 245, note 31.


 


THE  WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 38.                      Washington, Pa., Wednesday, October 30, 1844.                      No. 17.



==> How far it may be true that the Catholics are banding themselves together politically. we are not able to say; it is so alleged, and with some apparent plausibility... The great mass of our religious denominations, of every kind, divide upon the subject of politics and are found like any civic class of citizens, a part for our party and our candidates, and a part for the other party and candidates.

The Mormons, however, have acted upon a different principle. They go to the polls en masse and wherever they have settled have been found dangerous citizens, because they act under the guidance of their Priests, Smith and Rigdon, and then bring the whole weight of their politico-religious system to bear upon the rights of their neighbors.

The Roman Catholics are charged with being organized in a like manner and for like purposes.

Of the organization no one can doubt who understands the nature of the Roman Catholic religion -- the power of the priesthood -- its unity of purpose and action and the advantages of information through the means of auricular confession, possessed by the head of that church -- a machinery far superior to that possessed by Joe Smith in his best days over his deluded followers... Protestants would do well to sleep with one eye open on this subject.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  Nov. 6, 1844.                                 No. 2.


 

MRS. JOE SMITH. -- GRAND DESIGN OF THE PROPHET. -- A correspondent at Alton, after stating that the recent murder of Joe Smith had been followed by a dispersion of his adherents, gives the following interesting items: Mrs. Joe Smith, it is said, has lost all confidence (if she ever had any) in the Mormon faith. She will soon retire to some secure situation, undoubtedly the richest lady in the West. Joe had been amassing money for several years, for the purpose of eventually going to Jerusalem, intending to issue a proclamation calling in the Jews, over whom he was to be head till the return of Christ upon the earth -- which event, he believed, would take place 45 years from 1844.

With reference to this expedition, he was crowned "King of Israel" in 1844, by the Council of Fifty, denominated the "Ancient of days." The fifty were all sworn to secrecy. This was the prophet's grand design, and affords a key to certain movements of the prophet, which are otherwise wholly inexplicable.


Note 1: A slightly longer reprint of this New Bedford Bulletin report may be read in the Portland, Maine Christian Mirror of Oct. 24, 1844. This is rare and unusual early exposure of the LDS secret Council of Fifty at Nauvoo and of their corronation of Joseph Smith, Jr., not only 'King of Israel' but also king of the entire planet. For the official LDS reaction, see the Nauvoo Neighbor of Jan. 1, 1845, whose editor implicitly admitted to Governor Ford's allegation, that Joseph Smith had been "crowned and anointed king." Since Ford did not state the full title of "King of Israel," the Neighbor editor took no pains to supply the whole truth of the matter -- instead, he made some vague comparisons of Joseph and Hyrum to Jesus Christ and resorted to an indefinite reliance upon "the precepts of religion according to the bible," in order to obscure the issue entirely.

Note 2: The assertion regarding Smith's plan to eventually travel in person to Jerusalem seems suspect -- see a similar report in the Putney Perfectionist of Nov. 2, 1844.


 


Vol. XII.                         Pittsburgh, Thursday  November 7, 1844.                             No. ?


 

GOV. FORD appears to be determined to keep up the escitement between the citizens of Hancock county and the Mormons, and if a collision does not ensue, it will certainly not be his fault. By the officers of the steamer Osprey, which left Nauvoo on Saturday evening last, we learn that a part of the Nauvoo Legion were being armed, and were to march to Carthage, in compliance with an order from the Governor -- but for what purpose was not positively known, but was supposed to [relate to] circumstances growing out of the trial of Sharpe and others, which is now progressing at that place. In a day or two we shall know the particulars. -- St. Louis Republican, Oct. 29.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. III.                         Pittsburgh, Tuesday, November 12, 1844.                         No. 55



JOE  SMITH,  THE  MORMON  PROPHET.

This was a very remarkable man, and his murder has brought no slight strain upon the State in which it was perpetrated. The Governor's pledge of honor for his safety did not secure him from assassination, though there was a company of armed men set over him to make good the pledge, and guard him against all violence. We lament the fanaticism of his followers, but the fanaticism which led to his violent death was, if not greater in itself, certainly of a more dangerous character. It was the fanaticism of hatred and cruelty -- a fanaticism that could not wait on the action of the law in the case of a prisoner, who had surrendered himself to the highest authority in the State, and that authority pledged to bring him to trial.

As to the character of the prophet, there is great diversity of opinion; yet it is in vain to deny that he was an extraordinary person. No man can by his own efforts get sway over a great number of minds and keep it for many successive years, unless he possesses extraordinary qualities. What we know of Smith has been almost wholly through his enemies, who, we may be very sure, have not done him justice.

The following account of his death, published at Nauvoo, by one of his followers, who was present at the bloody tragedy, may interest some of our readers. The narrative commends itself by its simplicity and straight-forwardness, and the absence of all violent and reproachful language towards the assailants. In truth we have set down the writer as a rare partizan of the prophet. -- New York Mirror.

(Willard Richards 1844 account follows)


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                         Pittsburgh, Wednesday  November 13, 1844.                             No. ?.


 

ROBBERY AT NAUVOO. -- The Mormons still seem to think that they render God service by robbing the Gentiles. On the night of the 16th of October, the store of Mr. Harrison Kimball at Nauvoo was robbed. A small safe, painted green, was taken, containing about $400 in gold, silver and paper money. A receipt for $8,000 worth of notes, given by Gamble and Walker; certificates of stock for $10,000 of the Farmers and Mechanics Insurance Company of St. Louis; 1 piece of blue cloth; 2 piece of blue Ky. janes; 1 piece mixed cloth; 1 piece olive cloth; 30 pieces prints, linsey, blue drills, bleached sheeting, and 1 $10 bill on the Jefferson County Bank, New York, No. 4121, letter A. Nothing has been heard of the goods or money since they so mysteriously disappeared -- St. Louis New Era.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                         Pittsburgh, Thursday  November 14, 1844.                             No. ?


 

MORMON DIFFICULTIES. -- We understand, says the St. Louis Republican, that the late grand jury of Hancock county, Illinois, assembled at Carthage, found indictments for the murder of Joseph and Hyrum Smith, against Sharp, Williams and ten others, making in all twelve indictments. -- It is believed some curious and probable strange developments of the political maneuvering and management of some of the political managers in Illinois will me made in the course of these trials. We are told that nearly every one indicted has caused subpoenas to be issued for Governor Ford; and boast of what they can prove in justification or extenuations by the Governor, Time will show how far these expectations are to be realized.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


THE  WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 38.                      Washington, Pa., Saturday, November 16, 1844.                      No. 19.



From the Transcript

NAUVOO

Its location; how the Mormons came by it; the dimentions of the city; of the city; houses; all residents are not of the Church; Temple; sculptured pilasters; interior finished; brazen laver; created by voluntary labor; the city will never be abandoned by its builders.

Nauvoo -- the City of the latter day saints -- the place where Mormonism is concentrated, is beautifully located on the East side of the Mississippi river, below the first rapids, and therefore accessible to the largest class of steamboats on the "Father of Waters." Its name is derived from two Hebrew words, somewhat distorted, which mean beautiful rest.

When the Mormons were driven from Missouri, after passing through a series of hardships of a very trying character, the present site of Nauvoo was selected by Sidney Rigdon, for a town. Several land claims were purchased of individuals, and by uniting the different parcels, constituted a Mormon territory. The chartered limits included a plat four miles long, by three in breadth -- all laid out into squares and streets, at right angles, and on a scale of convenience that is honorable to the taste of those who projected the plan. Those who have examined Nauvoo with any degree of care acknowledge that it possesses the elements of the most elegant city of the West.

When first taken possession of by the new owners, there were neither inhabitants nor dwellings; yet in the short period of three years, there were one thousand houses; and now the population is not far from sixteen thousand -- rapidly increasing too, notwithstanding the universal opinion of their enemies, that the spell is broken and the Mormon community will soon be dissolved. In a word, Nauvoo is the largest city in the state of Illinois -- and regarded in all respects, one of the greatest curiosities of that part of the continent. Nauvoo is divided into four wards, and governed by a Mayor, eight Aldermen and sixteen Common Council men -- constituting the city government.

Property is not held in common, as frequently represented; many persons holding real estate in the city are not Mormons, yet their rights and interests are protected with as much care as they would be in Boston or New York. There is not a square in the whole city that has not a building upon it. The squares being about a acre large, the houses have the appearance of being spread over a prodigious extent of surface -- all portions, therefore, not occupied in buildings are cultivated. As the population increases, the gardens will be fewer in number and smaller in their dimensions.

All the Mormons do not reside in the city; if they did, their number would increase the astonishment which already prevails. They extend both up and down the river nearly thirty miles as farmers. Quite a town is also growing up on the Missouri side, opposite Nauvoo. The ground plat of Nauvoo is shaped somewhat like an ox bow. The river embraces two sides of it; while the back ground rises magnificently about a mile from the Mississippi, giving the observer a vast field of vision over the most lovely rural scenery imaginable.

At the summit overlooking the whole landscape for nearly twenty five miles in all directions, stands the Mormon temple, the largest structure in any of the Western states. When completed it is assumed that the entire cost will not very much from four hundred thousand dollars. Nothing can be more original in architecture -- each of its huge pilasters rests upon a block of stone, bearing in relief on its face the profile of a new moon, represented with a nose and mouth, as sometimes seen in almanacs. On the top not far from fifty feet high, is an ideal representation of the rising sun, which is a monstrous prominent stone face, the features of which are colossal and singularly expressive. Still higher are two enormously large hands grasping two trumpets, crossed. These all stand out on the stone boldly. Their finish is admirable and as complete as any of the best specimens of chiseling on the Girard College at Philadelphia. The interior is to be one vast abasement about 128 feet by 80, simple subdivided by three great veils, or rich crimson drapery, suspended from the ceiling overhead. Neither pews, stools, cushions or chairs are to encumber the holy edifice. In the basement is the font of baptism -- which, when completed according to design, will be a pretty exact imitation of the brazen laver in Solomon's temple. -- The tank is perhaps eight feet square, resting on the backs of twelve carved oxen. -- They are of noble dimensions, with large spreading horns, represented to be standing in water half way up to their knees. The execution of the twelve oxen evinces a degree of ingenuity, skill and perseverance that would redound to the reputation of an artist in any community. When they are finally gilded, as intended, and the laver is made to resemble cast brass, together with the finishing up of the place in which this unique apparatus of the church is lodged -- as a whole, that part of the temple will be one of the most striking artificial curiosities in this country.

When the officiating priests in their long robes of office lead a solemn procession of worshippers through the sombre avenues of the basement story, chanting as they go, the effect must be exceedingly imposing to those who may deplore the infatuation of a whole city of Mormon devotees.

Although estimated to cost so large a sum, the walls of the temple are gradually rising from day to day by the concurrent unceasing labor of voluntary laborers. -- Every brother gives one day in ten to the undertaking. Thus there are always as many hands employed as can be conveniently on the work at the same time. The architect and different master workmen are constantly at hand to direct the operations. -- Each day, therefore, ushers in a new set of operatives.

Some fine brick buildings are already raised on the different streets, and stores are continually going up. Even were the Mormons to abandon the city, as it is asserted that they will. somebody will own the property -- and a city it is, and a city it will continue to be, of importance, unconnected with the false religious tenets of its inhabitants. But the Mormons will never leave Nauvoo -- no never. Its associations are half wed in their excited imaginations. -- They would relinquish life as soon as they would voluntarily, en masse, leave -- their glorious habitation which to them is the gate of Heaven.   S.


Note: See also the Adams Sentinel, of Jan. 6, 1845.


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  Nov. 20, 1844.                                 No. 4.



MORMONISM.

Rigdon now says that Nauvooites are worse than Sodomites. -- Enq.

But who in this matter sets any store by what he says? Will this exaggerated picture of Mormon immorality coming from him either be approved by the public, or admitted as an adequate apology for the detestable part he has acted in Smith's conspiracy against the Christian religion? Is it not only since he was forced to retire from Nauvoo, defeated in his miserable ambition to succeed Smith, that he has made the discovery which he now announces to the world?

About four months ago, when he first spoke in Pittsburgh, did not J. Smith and his followers then stand so high for every virtue, in the judgment of Mr. Rigdon, that he boldly and publicly affirmed the whole world united could not put Smith to death? and that the reports concerning it were false and incredible? Did he not then say all this, and more too? Did he not on that occasion, discover in his public address a swaggering levity and a want of reverence for the Divine Majesty, that made good men quail and feel at once afraid and ashamed of his rashness. The Mormon conspiracy against Christianity asks not for the charity due to a Protestant sect. It claims to be original and authoritative, and must, like Romamism, either be approved or argued down at all hazards.

But the worls cannot just yet forgive, and surely they will never wholly forget, the deeds of rapine and imposture perpetrated by the leaders of Mormonism,     S.

==> Rigdon and Rage -- Arcades Ambo. Notice is hereby given to the public to beware of receiving the ordinance of Baptism at the hands of Mr. Sidney Rigdon, Esq., or any of his adherents, thinking to attach themselves to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints -- for Mr. S. Rigdon is at this time expelled from the aforesaid Church, and all his adherents are suspended from the performance or administration of any ordinance whatever, until they repent and adhere to the proper authorities of the said Church. For whatever Mr. S. Rigdon, or his adherents may say, or do, under the pretention or nominal name of Latter Day Saints, in a legal point of light, will be no more in connection with the true Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, than the Republic of the Unired States has with the Crown of England.
JOHN E. PAGE, Elder,         
And one of the Twelve traveling high council of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

All editors will do the public a favor by copying the above.   J. E. P.
      October 10, 1844.


Note 1: The Unionist editor, Elder Walter Scott, here mentions that Sidney Rigdon "first spoke" in public in Pittsburgh "about four months" before Scott published his remarks -- which fixes the date of Rigdon's speech near the middle of the previous July. The Pittsburgh People's Organ of June 29, 1844 gives Rigdon's date of arrival in that city as "June the 27th" and promises a public address by the Mormon leader on July 7th. By that date, however, the Cincinnati papers announcing the assassination of Joseph and Hyrum Smith had arrived in Pittsburgh, and Rigdon was confronted with the implications and possible outcome of that remarkable event, ere he voiced a single line of his scheduled public address. Orson Hyde's 1845 account of Rigdon's July 7, 1844 speech reads as follows: "Mr. Rigdon arrived in Pittsburgh on the morning of the 27th of June, the very day on which Joseph and Hyrum Smith were murdered. One week from the following Sunday he preached to a large audience in Mr. Broadhurst's green, and directed the whole tide and strength of his eloquence to extol and eulogize Joseph Smith, and also this city and people of Nauvoo. This I have from an eye and ear witness whose testimony I cannot doubt, for it is corroborated by many. One would even suppose that Nauvoo and her inhabitants were just let down from the celestial world according to his description of them" and now the iniquity and corruption that are alledged against the church by him, are urged as an apology for his standing on the back ground for the last few years. Who believes him to be an honest man? ("None who know him." resounded from different parts of the audience.) By this time, the news had just reached Mr. Rigdon, of the murder of Joseph and Hyrum, but he did not believe it, and even told the Lord in his public prayer that he did not believe it..." The full content of Rigdon's July 7th speech, given on the lawn of Captain William Broadhurst's "Clinton House" on Penn Street, was evidently never preserved; (Broadhurst's tavern yard was then a popular venue for Whig political meetings and other public gatherings in Pittsburgh).

Note 2: A contemporary example of Sidney Rigdon comparing the Nauvooites to Sodomites can be found in the columns of his first Messenger & Advocate, which says: "On the subject of Joseph Smith having informed the Twelve that they must bear off this kingdom to the nations, I answer there was no necessity... They assert that the burden of the church was put upon them by Joseph... examine the 3d and 4th chapters of Isaiah. The first three verses of the 3d chap. tell who the Lord will take away from Jerusalem. (I will just say perhaps you will see its application upon Nauvoo fulfilled.) The subsequent part of the chapter tells an awful tale about oppression -- the spoil of the poor -- the beating of the people to pieces -- the sin of Sodom, which was more particularly whoredom; also women rule over them, the princes, and if you please, the Twelve and others; and mark what is said about the daughters of Zion, and their corruptions; and after the Lord positively mentions the horrible disease which usually follows such abomination, and also the judgment of God upon them..."

Note 3: Elders Walter Scott and Sidney Rigdon appear to have generally ignored each other's respective residence in Pittsburgh throughout 1844-46. Rigdon made a passing reference to Scott in his Messenger & Advocate of September, 1846, where he says: "... years afterwards [c. 1823-30] there was another attempt made to reform Babylon, in the persons of A. Campbell and his associates; the bible again, was to be the creed; this reformation had added a little to the former [at the time of Elias Smith, etc.], they added the item of remission of sins to baptism... B. Stone of the former reformation, and A. Campbell of the latter, partially united... [but not] very firmly; B. Stone said some things, and wrote some things about the gift of the Hily Spirit which did not relish very well with A. Campbell and his associates, and again their pens are employed against each other. This order of things did not long exist; in a few years behold one of A. Campbell's principal men, W. Scott, has changed his position, from trying to reform Babylon, he is trying to unite her, and his Protestant Unionist is now in existence..."


 


THE  WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 38.                      Washington, Pa., Saturday, November 23, 1844.                      No. 20.



From the Illinois State Register, Nov. 1.

MORMON  AFFAIRS.

We saw a statement in the Missouri Republican, that the Mormons and Indians had assembled in great force, near Carthage, in Hancock county, Illinois, as it was supposed, with hostile intentions towards some of the good citizens of the county, &c.

The facts as we have learned them from an authentic source, are about as follows: [The Circuit Court of that county met on the 21st.] There were recognized to attend this court, all the common council of the city of Nauvoo, and many other persons of that place, charged with a riot in destroying the press and materials of the Nauvoo Expositor in June last. Those persons and their witnesses, making in all about one hundred persons, being poor, and most of them unable to pay tavern bills in town, and wishing to avoid the show of so large a Mormon force about the court, came to the very laudable conclusion of camping out some three or four miles from town, where they could be at all times ready to attend court upon a short notice to answer the charges against them.

In addition to this, some twenty Potawatamie Indians, with their women and children, on their way to hunt muskrats in Iowa, passed through the country about sixteen miles from Carthage, about the same time. They had no connection with Mormons or any other persons in the county, but passing through without molesting any one, and this was the great Mormon and Indian force referred to.

Now for the object of getting up this story, and the use that was attempted to be made of it. It was well understood that at the court an attempt would be made to indict the persons who were guilty of murdering Joseph and Hyrum Smith, while they were confined in the Carthage Jail, in June last, to prevent which something must be done by the mob patty in Hancock.

They appointed a committee of safety, and directed that the Judge should be informed of the resolutions of the meeting, that he might consult his safety, &c.

Judge Thomas did not wait to be called upon, but without much form or ceremony, he let those panic makers know that he should not obey their order to adjourn; and they with all their force could not deter him from doing his duty. And furthermore, if any of them appeared about the court house with arms or any other hostile demonstrations, that he would order them instantly to jail, and if necessary he would be one of the posse to aid in the execution of the order. -- This so deterred the out-breakers, that they dared not even present their resolutions to the court.

They then attempted to frighten the Grand Jury, and through some of their friends had the question started there, whether they should go to court, raise the alarm, and advise the court to adjourn? The jury, however, as promptly rejected the exposition as did the judge, and instead of adjourning, proceded to find indictments against eight of the murderers of the Smiths, and seven or eight of the Mormons who destroyed the printing press in Nauvoo, thus enforcing the laws against mob violence, whether perpetrated by Mormons or Anti-Mormons. The mob became alarmed, their forces dispersed, and the adjourned meeting was never held. -- The Mormons got through their business in court, broke up their camp, and went home. The poor Indians, unconscious of the stir they were making among the white people of Hancock, went ahead wuth their war upon the muskrats, and at the latest dates all was peaceable in Carthage.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  December 4, 1844.                             No. 6.



The  Mormons  Divided.

One party of the Mormons have issued their manifesto, declaring the Mormon church to be dissolved on account of its rejection of Rigdon as its divinely appointed leader.

The Alton Telegraph says that the elements of discord are successfully at work in the community at Nauvoo, and no doubt rests upon our minds but that the total dissolution of the church will be the inevitable result. Factions may spring up among them, and some unprincipled and ambitious leader seek to set himself on the throne of power, so firmly established by Joe Smith, for his own base purposes. But every such attempt will, as heretofore, result in a failure. With the fall of the mock prophet fell also the throne of despotism he had erected in this republic, and the charm that enabled him to delude the populace, has, with his death, departed, we trust, for ever.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                         Pittsburgh, Tuesday  December 31, 1844.                             No. 126.



MORMON  TROUBLES.

We learn from the Warsaw Signal that the Mormon difficulties in Hancock county, Illinois, are increasing. A long list of acts thieving are given, attributed to the Mormons. Public meetings have been called by the Anti-mormons to take measures to defend and protect themselves from the depradations. The end of the trouble in that region is not yet.

The Warsaw paper tells a story of a farmer of McDonough county, who brought a load of Pork at Nauvoo, and sold it readily for the hard cash. He had not got out of town, however, before he found that his cash was all Bogus. Hastening back, he found his pork had just taken passage over to the new state of Iowa.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  January 8, 1845.                         No. 133.


 

MORMONISM. -- Gov. Ford of Illinois has sent a long-labored message to the Legislature on the subject of "Mormon Difficulties." It forms a pamphlet, and the object of it appears to be to white-wash the Mormons and himself, and to blackguard the old citizens of Hancock county. He will secure to himself a just claim to the appellation of the Great Honey-fuggler. He feels as if his unjust and gasconading proceedings in relation to the Mormons had brought on him the contempt of a large portion of the people, and that it is necessary for him to make this labored defence. It would appear that he is still hampered by the ghost of Joe Smith, and that he is trying to get clear of it by casting the blame on the people of Hancock.

The pamphlet-message of the Governor is said to be an excellent Mormon document, and may serve as some atonement for leaving Joe Smith imprisoned, with an insufficient guard, in the midst of his mortal enemies, and where he must have known that he would be speedily murdered. His late Mormon war, and this last defence of the Mormons may still enable him to retain his influence among them, and to control one or two thousand Mormon votes. He takes ground against the repeal of the Charter of the City of Nauvoo, but goes in for its [qualification]. It is probable that the stand taken by the Governor in favor of the Mormons will aggravate the indignant state of public feeling that now exists on that subject in Upper Illinois. Gov. Ford should embrace Mormonism, place himself at their head, and have himself proclaimed as the legitimate successor of Joe Smith. He is qualified for the place. --   St. Louis New Era.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  January 8, 1845.                             No. 11.


 

ANTICIPATED EXPOSURE OF MORMONISM. -- Mr. Wood, one of Joe Smith's counsel at the time of his death, is said to have prevailed on the late prophet's widow, to make a full exposure of Mormonism, and to allow him to publish it. -- The story, however, is rather doubtful.



MORMONISM IN SCOTLAND. -- About five hundred persons are said to have assembled in Glasgow, clothed in mourning for the death of Joe Smith!


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  January 15, 1845.                             No. 12.



                        From the Christian Reflector.
THE  MORMON  PROPHET.

It is but a few weeks, since the death of Joe Smith was announced. His body now sleeps, and his spirit has gone to its reward. Various are the opinions of men concerning this singular personage; but whatever may be the views of any reference to his principles, objects, or moral character, all must admit that he was one of the most remarkable men of the age.

Not fifteen years have elapsed since a band, composed of six persons, was formed in Palmyra, N. Y., of which Joseph Smith, Jr. was the presiding genius. Most of these were connected with the family of Smith, the senior. They were notorious for breach of contracts and the repudiation of their honest debts. All of them were addicted to vice. They obtained their living, not by honorable labor, but by deceiving their neighbors with their marvellous tales of money-digging. Notwithstanding the low origin, poverty, and profligacy of the members of that band of mountebanks, they have augmented their members till more than 100,000 persons are now numbered among the followers of the Mormon prophet, and never were increasing so rapidly as at the time of his death. Joe Smith arose from the very lowest grade of society, to the head of this large body, without any of those aids, by which most other men have ascended to their high stations. -- He is represented by those acquainted with him, as uneducated, uncouth in his manners, dissipated in his habits, and disgusting in his personal appearance; and yet unaided by the influence of literature, or the patronage of the great, he induced thousands to obey his mandates, and to rally around his standard. He fought his way through all these adverse circumstances, and left the impress of his depraved genius upon his age, and his name will not be forgotten when that of many a statesman has long been buried in oblivion. --

Born in the very lowest walks of life, reared in poverty, educated in vice, having no claims to even common intelligence, coarse and vulgar in deportment, the prophet Smith succeeded in establishing a religious creed, the tenets of which have been taught throughout the length and breadth of America. The prophet's virtues have been rehearsed and admired in Europe; the ministers of Nauvoo have even found a welcome in Asia, and Africa has listened to the grave sayings of the seer of Palmyra. The standard of the Latter Day Saints has been reared on the banks of the Nile, and even the Holy Land has been entered by the emissaries of this wicked impostor.

He founded a city in one of the most beautiful situations in the world, -- in a beautiful curve of the 'father of waters,' of no mean pretension, and in it he has collected a population of 25,000 from every part of the earth. He planned the architecture of a magnificent temple, and reared its walls nearly fifty feet, which, if completed, will be the most beautiful, most costly, and the most noble building in America. Its walls are of solid stone, four feet in thickness; supported by thirty stone pillars. That building is a monument pointing the traveller to the genius of its founder.

The acts of his life exhibit a character as incongruous as it is remarkable. If we can credit his own words, and the testimony of eye-witnesses, he was at the same time the vicegerent of God, and a tavern keeper -- a prophet of Jehovah, and a base libertine -- a minister of the religion of peace, and a lieutenant general -- a ruler of tens of thousands, and a slave to all his own base unbridled passions -- a preacher of righteousness, and a profane swearer -- a worshipper of the God of Israel, and a devotee of Bacchus -- mayor of a city, and a miserable bar-room fiddler -- a judge upon the judicial bench, and an invader of the civil, social and moral relations of men; and notwithstanding these inconsistencies of character, there are not wanting thousands who are willing to stake their souls' eternal salvation upon his veracity. For aught we know, time and distance will embellish his life with some new and rare virtues which his most intimate friends failed to discover while living with him.

Reasoning from effect to cause, we must conclude that the Mormon prophet was of no common genius; few are able to commence and carry out an imposition like his so long, and to such an extent. And we see, in the history of his labors and success, most striking proofs of the gullibility of a large portion of the human family. What may not men be induced to believe and follow?
GAMMA.        

Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Monday  Morning,  January 27, 1845.                         No. 150.

 

THE MORMON CHARTERS. -- In the Illinois House of Representatives, at the date of our latest intelligence, the subject of the repeal of the Mormon charters was under full discussion. The two or three Mormon members of the House were storming like madmen. One or two test votes left little or no doubt that the infamous charters would be repealed. All the better portion of the Locofoco members went for the repeal with scarecely less zeal than the Whigs. Mr. Benedict, a leading Locofoco, declared that no man was more strongly wedded in his party than he, but that great as was the Locofoco majority in the State, he would far prefer defeat, standing by the immutable principles of truth and honesty, to seeing his party longer triumph by truckling to the miserable Mormons. --   Louisville Journal.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  February 12, 1845.                             No. 16.


 

THE MORMON CHARTERS. -- In the Illinois House of Representatives, at the date of our latest intelligence, the subject of the repeal of the Mormon charters was under full discussion. The two or three Mormon members of the House were storming like madmen. One or two test votes left little or no doubt that the infamous charters would be repealed. All the better portion of the Locofoco members argue for the repeal with scarcely less zeal than the whigs. Mr. Benedict, a leading Locofoco, declared that no man was more strongly wedded to his party than he, but that, great as was the Locofoco majority in the State, he would prefer defeat, standing by the immutable principles of truth and honesty, to seeing his party longer triumph by truckling to the miserable Mormons. -- Louisville Journal.



A bill to repeal the Nauvoo City Charter has passed the Senate of the Illinois Legislature, and it is thought will pass the House.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Monday  Morning,  March 5, 1845.                         No. 181.


 

ILLINOIS. -- The Legislature is bringing their business to a close. We are gratified to see that the Senate have laid on the table the bill granting a new charter to Nauvoo. The Canal bill occupies the principal attention...

Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  March 20, 1845.                         No. 194.



==> The city of Nauvoo will not give up its charter, notwithstanding the legislative act of its repeal. Recently the Municipal election came off as usual. The St. Louis Reveille observes that all the officers of the city were duly elected. The whole system of government in the city is enforced as usual. The leading Mormons say the Legislature has no power to repeal their charter, that it is not repealed, and they will pay no attention to the repeal law, but to go on as usual. We may anticipate a quarrel.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  March 26, 1845.                         No. 199.


 

THE MORMONS. -- We learn from Hancock county, Illinois, that considerable apprehension exists of further difficulties with the Mormons. It appears that the Sheriff of the county on last Friday evening arrested at a ball an individual named Elliott, who had been taken up and tried at Nauvoo a short time since, charged with being concerned in the murder of the Smiths, but had escaped from his custody before committing him to prison. Elliott had made an application for a writ of habeas corpus, and it is supposed he will be liberated.

Two individuals were arrested in Nauvoo a few days ago -- one for perjury in the case of Elliott, and the other upon a requisition of the Governor of Iowa -- both of whom were rescued from the hands of the officers in Nauvoo. These two cases have combined to create some bad feeling, and many suppose it may lead to the enactment of the scenes of last summer. -- St. Louis Repub.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  March 26, 1845.                             No. 16.


 

NAUVOO. -- A constable of Hancock county, from near Warsaw, has lately been arrested and imprisoned at Nauvoo while in discharge of his duty. His jailors have expressed their determination to hold on to him at all hazards. He is charged with being concerned in the Smith murders.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Extra.]                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  April 11?, 1845.                                 [Extra.



TERRIBLE  VISITATION.

Like the broad river whose silent flow renders us insensible to the sources whence it derives its waters, the ordinary providences of God are so mild and equable that they frequently lull us to repose, and fail to make us feel that the Most High either pervades them with his presence or controls them by his power. It is when his judgments, like the mountain torrent, come 'rushing amain down,' that man is made sensibly alive to his glory. If night shines forth in unsullied beauty -- calm, broad, and glorious, mortals rightfully indeed, but thoughtlessly alas! embrace its sacred repose, and softly dream away the lee-long night; but if the Eternal pitch his tent in the heavens; if he make his pavilion round about him dark waters and thick clouds of the sky; if he flies upon the wings of the wind, and the stars are the dust of his feet, men are wakeful, they tremble and are afraid, and confess a present God. When Morn enthrones herself on the brow of heaven, arrayed in glory and beauty, heralded by the throng of woodland voices, fanned by scented breezes, her feet washed in the dews of night; when Flora scatters her path with flowers, and the whole earth is responsive to her all-cheerful voice, mortals are entranced with the beauty and sublimity of nature. But does she come on in clouds and storms? Does she array herself in bickering lightnings, and speak to the nations in peals of thunder? then men stand aghast, they are aroused, and lose their sense of the sublime and beautiful in their reverence for Him 'Who rules the whirlwind and directs the storm.' When the ordinary business of society proceeds apace, calm and unbroken, men silently systematize their plans of life and schemes of business; they gradually become proud, imperious, and unfeeling. But let the general order of life be suddenly interrupted by some great calamity; let the fountains of the great deep of trade and commerce be rudely and forcibly broken up; then men perceive that God's judgments are abroad in the earth, and they learn righteousness; the sympathies of society are restored and generalized; the storm is passed; men are refreshed; they resolve henceforth to live more according to nature; they reform their plans; they do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with God.

These moralizings are preliminary to recording one of the most calamitous and fearful conflagrations that ever invaded the streets of any city. One fourth of Pittsburg is a heap of ruins -- absolutely consumed by fire, so that, with one of old, we may say, 'Behold and see, all ye that pass by, whether there be any sorrow like unto our sorrow wherewith the Lord hath afflicted us in the day of his fierce anger.' Almost sixty broad acres of our dear city have become a wilderness, in which nothing is beheld but stacks of chimneys, shattered colonnades, pillars of blackened stone, unshapely fragments of ruined workshops and overthrown factories, the leaning relics of ruined temples, edifices, and public buildings, now, alas! no more!

The field of this mighty devastation lies in the form of an isosceles triangle, the Monongahela River, for more than a mile in extent, constituting the base, and the other two sides, commencing at the two extremes of this line, running diagonally into the heart of the city, and meeting in a common point somewhere near the court-house. The vast area embraced in this regular figure is said to have included 12 or 1500 houses and public edifices, not one of which is left unconsumed. All are reduced to indistinguishable ruin -- overthrown, broken down to the ground, burnt to ashes.

Ferry Street commences at the Monongahela River, and extends thence in a direction toward the Alleghany River. It was near the Monongahela terminus of Ferry Street the great conflagration commenced. It is ascertained to have originated in an ice-house, whence in the lapse of a few hours it spread its destructive flames with fearful effect over the whole immense area already described.

We could wish to communicate to the readers of the 'Protestant Unionist' some adequate idea of the whole extraordinary scene, and of some points in it in particular, but our faculties are unequal to the task. The broad acres, as they were convulsed by the fiery deluge and swept by the whirlwind of flame, presented a scene so vast and awful, and in some points so inconceivably grand and terrific, as to defy all our feeble powers of description. The ocean of tumult and fire would have supplied matters and marvels for the faculties of Dante or Milton. At first vigorously opposed, repressed, and hemmed in by the efforts of the firemen, the conflagration progressed but slowly, but at one o'clock the wind, veering round two points against the city, and, arming itself with the strength and fury of a tempest, spread the fire abroad with amazing rapidity, and, by inflamed shingles, fagots, and burning fragments of windows, doors, and casings, inoculated with the burning contagion every thing within the precincts already described! Let the reader imagine what a flood of fire that must have been whose fuel was supplied with all that was combustible in 1200 houses, offices, temples, workshops, academies, universities, market-places, and manufactories! Then it was the affrighted populace might be seen fleeing from their inflamed vicinities like a flock of sheep, happy to outstrip the fiery storm that pursued them, and consumed without remorse all they owned of earthly goods! Hundreds were beggared in an hour! 'O Lord, thou art our Father; we are the clay, thou art the potter; we are all the work of thy hand. Be not wroth very sore, O Lord, neither remember iniquity forever; behold, see, we beseech thee, we are all thy people.'

The burning of Mr. Bakewell's glass-house was a splendid and affecting scene in the drama of the great conflagration; but the Monongahela House, as it passed through the fiery ordeal, presented to the eye and the feelings the most awful and exiting spectacle. We beheld the destruction of this great ornament of our city with lively anguish. It was five stories, and extended in breadth across an entire square. The flying fagots first seized upon the wood casing of the brass cupola with which the building was surmounted. In fifteen minutes it flamed like a Pharos on the lofty pile, then burning shingles struck against the eaves of the building, which kindled with amazing rapidity, and the house forthwith was corniced with fire. In ten minutes more, flames began to ascend from the roof. The windows burned, and burst, and broke. The flames were speedily seen devouring the interior; they seized upon the doors and floors, the internal casings, and all the various articlesof furniture with which this spacious hotel was enriched. The most tempestuous conflagration now pervaded the entire house; and while the interior raged like a volcano, the west corner and west side were lashed with unequaled fury by flames from the adjacent warehouses; the whole edifice trembled to its foundation; its floors sunk, its doors and windows vanished like a dream; its walls fell, and in an amazing brief space of time it came forth from the terrible ordeal the unshapely ruin which is now seen where the once celebrated Monongahela House so lately reared its head. The Lord have mercy upon us. It was a fearful sight to behold! We are mortals of a day.

We never before witnessed any spectacle so extraordinary as the conflagration of the Monongahela bridge. A few fagots first dropped upon the roof of the structure at the end of the bridge next the city; they burnt through it in a moment, and falling, with other inflamed matter, upon the immense quantities of furniture which had been thrust into the bridge for safety, fired them instantly. This caused a great and sudden expansion, and the bridge became a vast funnel, through which the streaming atmosphere roared with the noise of thunder. It must be remembered, however, that all the phenomena here were short-lived truly, for the whole affair was over in twelve minutes! A leader of smoke without, preceded by a train of fire within, ran along the eaves of the structure and in its course fired the whole length of the bridge. It crossed the river in seven and a half minutes. The floor of the bridge now poured downward toward the surface of the water a vast volume of dark, black smoke. This the winds turned upward under the bridge, so that the whole inflamed fabric seemed to rest upon this as a basis; and while the entire frame, yet unbroken, glowed with scarlet brightness, it seemed some aerial machine panting to ascend on its black yet gracefully fashioned basis of cloud to some destined ethereal port in the heavens. But lo! in a moment all the phenomena are reversed, changed; the scarlet weather-boarding and the roof are for an instant powdered over with white ashes, the whole is then convulsed suddenly and bursts like a bubble; then the timbers crack and break, and the flaming arches in quick succession and with fearful combustion descend in horrid ruin to the bosom of the river. 'O Lord, all our righteousness is as filthy rags, and we do all fade as a leaf, and our iniquities, like the wind, have carried us away.' 'Have mercy upon us, O Lord, have mercy upon us, for we are weak.'

But while we have seen the monuments of our civic greatness yield in succession to the devouring flame; while we have witnessed much of what was magnificent, beautiful, and excellent in our city reduced to ashes; while we have beheld banks, offices, churches, academies, and whatever commanded the admiration of foreigners, or formed objects of just satisfaction to our own citizens, consumed by fire, much is there, nevertheless, in the whole calamity to excite our gratitude. Very few lives have been lost; much sympathy has been excited in behalf of the sufferers, and a new and vast field has been opened for the liberality, love, and best feelings of the philanthropist and the Christian. Let it not be with us, as with those of whom it is said, 'They repented not to give him glory.' 'Let us humble ourselves under the mighty hand of God, and he will exalt us in due time.' Let us take with us words and come and say, 'Take away our iniquities and receive us graciously; heal our backslidings and love us freely.' And the Lord will be to us 'as the dew.' We shall 'grow as the lily,' and shall 'cast forth our roots as Lebanon.' The Lord grant that all our citizens may hear, and fear, and rely upon the Lord, and make him their fear forever!"


Note: While the publication date of this "extra" was very likely Apr. 11, 1845, it may possibly have been issued the following day. Elder Walter Scott's Protestant Unionist then suspended publication until May 28th. The text is taken from William Baxter's 1874 Life of Elder Walter Scott, pp. 398-403.


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  April 22, 1845.                         No. 221.


 

A NEW PROPHET. -- It is rumored that Orson Hyde is to become the prophet and head of the Mormon church. It is not said by what process he is to derive his authority. J. B. Backenstos, the Mormon representative in the last Legislature, from Hanock county, Ill., has been waited upon by the citizens of Carthage, and notified to leave the county within a week. In the event of his refusal, they promise him a visit not of so pacific a character. The cause of this proceeding, on the part of the citizens, was an attack made by Backenstos upon the old citizens in a speech delivered in the Legislature. -- St. Louis Repub.


Note: The rumors saying that Apostle Orson Hyde was "to become the prophet and head of the Mormon church" may have originated in St. Louis. Following his journey eastward (shadowing Sidney Rigdon at least as far as Ohio) in the later part of 1844, Hyde returned westward to St. Louis and took up temporary residence there for a few months. Perhaps Hyde's presence in St. Louis was required to hold together the LDS congregation there, after several of its members followed its former Branch President, Elder William Small, back to Pittsburgh to join the standard of Sidney Rigdon. While Hyde may have appeared to be the leader of the Mormons to the people in St. Louis, he remained loyal to Brigham Young and made no moves to elevate himself in "Brigham's Quorum." In fact, when the basis for seniority in that leadership group was changed from age to number of continuous years in office, Hyde allowed himself to be demoted within the apostolic ranks -- to the point that he might never aspire to become its leader.


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  May 5, 1845.                         No. 232.


 

==> The following correspondence of the N. Y. Tribune very truly states the condition of affairs at Nauvoo, and the surrounding country. From a careful observation of this paper, and by correspondence, we have become convinced that the Mormons will have to be driven off by force or the people must leave their neighborhood entirely. Their ignorance and fanaticism, and theivish propensities, render it impossible for any community to live in peace with them.

Correspondence of the New York Tribune.

The Mormon Troubles.

Nauvoo, Illinois, April 16, 1845.      

The difficulties between the Mormons and Anti-Mormons, which have been so rife for a year past, still continue. Mormonism, instead of exploding here, is it was supposed it would, upon the death of the Prophet, Joe Smith, has continued as flourishing as ever. Joe's place has been supplied by "The Twelve Apostles," who now rule the destinies of this band of ignorant lawless and unprincipled fanatics with the sway of despotism. The Temple is still progressing, and the outside will probably be completed this season. When completed, it will be a beautiful edifice, far surpassing anything in the State. It is one hundred and twenty eight feet long and eighty-eight feet wide, and is sixty feet from the basement to the eaves. They are now building a wall eight feet wide and fourteen feet high, all around it, enclosing six acres. What the object of this wall is, I am not aware, but the Anti-Mormons see in it a great Mormon fortification. One thing is certain -- the Mormons are fast increasing in power and strength, and they talk openly of defending themselves against every thing that does not suit their actions. Every house has arms in it, and there is scarcely a man in the city who does not carry arms on his person. They permit no process of law to be executed upon the inhabitants f the Holy City, unless it suits the sovereign majesty of the Saints. No man is permitted to express any opinions here derogatory to the character and standing of the people. If he does, he is immediately driven out of the city by a Mormon Mob. There have been several instances of this kind lately.

The trial of the persons indicted for the murder of the Smiths last summer comes on at Carthage in this County in four weeks from Monday next. It will be a time of tremendous excitement. Some six or seven of the most respectable citizens of the County are indicted for the murder of the Smiths, and among the number are Hon. Jacob C. Davis, State Senator; Thomas C. Sharpe, Esq., Editor of the Warsaw Signal,; W. N. Grover, Esq., Counsellor at Law; and Col. Williams. All these gentlemen have strong friends wgo are determined they shall have fair play -- several military companies from the Anti-Mormon portions of the County and from the adjoining Counties will reconnoitre at the County Seat in Court week. -- The "Nauvoo Legion" will probably be on hand also. If the appearance of the Mormon Legion would not put old Jack Falstaff's ragged regiment to the blush, I am mistaken.

One of Mr. Polk's nominees, a Jack-Mormon, by the name of Backenstos, who resides at Carthage, is in trouble. The Mormons sent him to the Legislature last winter where he made himself busy in abusing the old citizens of the County, and when he returned from Springfield a week or two ago, the citizens of Carthage went en masse to his house and gave him the notice to leave the town in a certain time. Before the time expired, he received notice of his appointment by the President to some lucrative office in the Lead Mines, and, by begging hard, the citizens, on account of his family, concluded to let him stay a week or teo longer to settle up his business. They did not extend this act of grace to him, however, without pelting his house with rocks.

What will be the end of all these troubles no man can foretell; but I am apprehensive that there will be a terrible collision one of these days. The Mormons and Antis can never live in peace any more; the hatred existing between them is deep, deadly and inveterate. One party must leave; and if the old citizens of the county are driven from their houses and their firesides by Mormon persecution, a feeling of indignation will be aroused among the people of Illinois that will not be quelled, until the last vestage of Mormonism is driven from Illinois as it was from Missouri.   Yours, &c.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                           Pittsburgh, Thursday,  May 7, 1845.                               No. 234.



MORE  MORMON  FANATICISM.

Very few of our readers we presume are aware that Pittsburgh is the center of a very important and extensive branch of the Mormon delusion, and that Grand Councils, and Conventions and Quorums are held here, and that a semi-monthly paper is published. The head of this branch of these modern impostors is SIDNEY RIGDON, who was well known in this region, as a Baptist preacher, before he united his fortunes with those of Joe Smith. Since the death of the latter, Rigdon has fallen out with the "Council of Twelve," who now rule at Nauvoo, and was forcibly compelled to leave the "city of thieves." We do not understand exactly the nature of the quarrel, but bekieve that Rigdon, who was one of the three members of the High Presidency, -- Joe and Hiram Smith being the other two, -- on the death of the Smiths, considered himself of the highest power and authority among the 'Saints.' The 'Council of Twelve,' the next in authority, not relishing this, usurped the supreme power, asserting that as the quorum of Presidents was broken, it could not be restored. They therefore expelled Rigdon, and have maintained their power to the present. Many of the "Saints," however, have rallied around Rigdon, who has established himself in this city, and has lately received so many new revelations that he bids fair to rival Joe Smith himself.

A friend has given us a copy of the Mormon paper published in this city, which is called the "Messenger and Advocate," of date May 1st, from which we learn that a "Conference of the Church of Christ," as it is denominated, has been held in this city, commencing on the 6th of April, and ending on the 11th. By this "Conference," the "Kingdom of God," as these fanatics say, was organized in this city. From a portion of the proceedings of this body we append a few extracts, to show our readers that quite as strange things are enacted in this enlightened age as ever took place in the darkest eras. On Monday the 7th of April, the "Kingdom of God" was organized, and the editor does not forget to tell us, it was the very day on which the great earthquake took place in the city of Mexico. On Wednesday, the 9th, the following extraordinary proceedings are said to have taken place:

"Wednesday Afternoon, 2 o'clock.      

"Conference met pursuant to adjournment, and was called to order by Austin Cowles; the first presidency of the high Quorum entered and took their seats. President Rigdon arose and read Hymn on page 104. "Arise, arise, with joy survey," which was sung by the conference.

After which, President Rigdon said, since the commencement of this conference, I have had one unceasing desire, deep and intense, that was, to have the matter forever put at rest, whether God would accept our work. -- The Spirit whispered to me this morning to set apart some brothers, and consecrate them to God, in a room in my own house, which I did, (which was the reason I was not with you this morning,) and after the washing and anointing, the Patriarchial seal, as the Lord has directed me, we kneeled, and in solemn prayer we asked God to accept the work we had done; during the time of prayer there appeared over our heads, in the room, a ray of light forming a hollow square, inside of which, stood a company of heavenly messengers, each with a banner in his hand, with their eyes looking downward upon us, their countenances expressive of the deep interest they felt in what was then passing on the earth; there also appeared heavenly messengers on horseback with crowns upon their heads, and [plumes floating] in the air, dressed in glorious attire, until like Elisha, we cried in our hearts, "the chariots of Israel, and the horsemen thereof;" even my little son of fourteen years of age saw the vision, and gazed with great astonishment, saying, that he thought his imagination was running away with him, after which we arose and lifted our hands to heaven in holy convocation to God, at which time, it was shown an angel in heaven, registering the acceptance of our work, and the decrees of the Great God, that the kingdom is ours, and we shall prevail; my anxieties, therefore, in relation to our work in organizing the kingdom, and the acceptance of that organization, by our heavenly Father, is now forever at rest.

Wlder Wm. E. McLellin, then, arose and bore testimony to the manifestations of the power of God in the heavenly vision; he then gave the substance of a revelation given in the morning relative to the opening ceremony of the consecration; after which he kneeled and dedicated the conference by prayer. He then arose, and said, brethren, I wish to say some things to you which will benefit you on the present occasion; he set forth in a clear manner, the principles which constitute the fulness of human happiness, giving much important instruction in relation to it.

President Rigdon then proceeded to ordain Hiram Falk and Curtis Hodges to the office of High Priests. After which several bottles of oil were presented and consecrated to the Lord."

The next day, April 10th, ever memorable on account of our Great Fire, was spent in "washings and annointings," and "consecrations," &c., until noon. In the afternoon, at 2 o'clock, the "Conference" met again. At this time the fire was raging in fearful sublimity. We here copy the proceedings of that afternoon, together with the notice of the fire, that our readers may know to whom they are indebted, according to these men, that the fire was stayed:

"The washings and annointing was contnued until the official members present were annointed. After having finished the annointing, president Rigdon read a hymn which was sung, after which all the quorums took their seats in proper order, to receive their Patriarchial seal. The Patriarch then proceeded to place his Seal upon their heads, sealing upon them all the promises and propheseyings pronounced upon them, during their washing and annointing, commencing with the quorum of the Twelve; next in order cames the presidents of the Stake of Pittsburgh, and the High Council. After these quorums had received their Patriarchial Seal, the Conference adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock. Benediction by President S. Rigdon."

This was the afternoon of the great fire which desolated our city. While we were thus organizing the Kingdom of our God, and consecrating the officers thereof, to the Most High, our city was fast laying in ruins by the violence of fire; and our friends and neighbors in the midst of sorrow, distress and confusion, were flying for their lives, amidst the ragings of the devouring elements, to places of safety, and leaving their all to perish in the common ruin. In the closing prayer, for the adjournment, president Rigdon presented before the Lord the deep distress and great calamity which was then befaling the inhabitants of the city; presenting before the heavens the widow and the fatherless, and the sufferings and deep afflictions that were overwhelming our city; oraying God to stay the violence of fire, that our whole city be not laid in ruins -- in which prayer the Conference joined with all the feelings of their soul. During this prayer, an escort of heavenly messengers that had hovered around as during the time of this Conference, were seen leaving the room, the course of the wind was instantly changed, and the violence of the flames were stayed "and our city saved from an entire overthrow."

So, these fanatics quietly pursued their mummeries while the city was consuming. The claims of humanity, the terrible sublimity of the spectacle, could not withdraw them from the practice of their impious ceremonies. Our citizens would have thanked them to have sent their "escort of heavenly messengers" a little sooner, and not have waited until the fairest part of our city was laid in ashes, and many lives had fallen a sacrifice to the devouring element.

Our readers are probably disgusted with what we have already given them of this specimen of the sad weakness and knavery of human nature. On the last day of the session of this body, each day of which was made up of blasphemous mummery, it was ordained that the Patriarch should have fifty cents for each blessing he delivered. He did not forget the means of 'raising the wind,' The following is also gravely told:

"Wm. E. McLellin then arose, and related to the conference the substance of a revelation given to himself and Joseph M. Cole, on last evening, while in their room at the house of president S. Rigdon, after having offered up solemn prayer to God, which was relative to the bones of the said Joseph M. Cole; it having been shown in a previous vision, that brother Cole should be slain before the coming of the Savior. The revelation had required on the part of brother McLellin, that he should enter into a covenant with brother Cole to carry his bones with him, as the bones of Joseph were carried out of Egypt, until the kingdom of God should meet Jesus upon mount Olivet; that there his bones might, with the bones of his brother and namesake, who was carried thither out of Egypt, come forth together in the morn of the resurrection, to partake in the triumph and glories of the kingdom of God."

Our readers will bear with us, if we copy the closing proceedings of this famous convocation. After various proceedings are related, among which are the confirming of "two sisters" who had been baptized the evening previous, the account proceeds:

The Book of Mormon was then received as the word of God, by the unanimous vote of the Conference.

The Book of Doctrine and Covenants was also received as a revelation from God, containing the pattern for the organization of his Church, by the unanimous vote of the Conference.

The Conference then stood upon their feet, with their hands lifted to heaven, and received the holy convocation, presenting the covenants which they had entered into, before God, and all the work they had done, asking God to register it in heaven, and place his seal of approbation upon the great work they had done before him; which the Lord did, and bore testimony by his Spirit, that he had accepted their work, and placed his seal upon it.

Elder J. M. Cole then related to the Conference a vision of heaven, shown to him last fall, giving a history of all the important events which shall transpire in the world until the Savior comes.

Conference adjourned to meet in tis city, on the 6th of April, 1846.
SIDNEY RIGDON, President. Wm. E. M'Lellin,
Joseph M. Cole,
             
} Secretaries.
George W. Robinson.


Note 1: The "Patriarch" who took such a prominent role in the "mummeries" of Sidney Rigdon's April 1845 conference at Pittsburgh was none other than his own brother, Carvil Rigdon. It is supposed that Carvil was at this time in deep collusion with Sidney in matters of latter day priestcraft and money collection. If not, then Carvil must have at the very least been fully duped by his brother in this strange and intensely pretentious rendition of Mormonism. It should be remembered that this same Carvil Rigdon was called upon (as a gentleman of "truth and veracity") in Jan. 1843 by Apostle John E. Page, to supply supposedly objective testimony showing that "S. Rigdon" was never in a situation to "see the Spaulding manuscript."

Note 2: The "Curtis Hodges" whom Rigdon ordained as a High Priest at his April 1845 conference was undoubtedly the same "C. Hodges" and "Curtis Hodges" who testified against D. P. Hurlbut (in behalf of Joseph Smith, Jr.), at Hurlbut's Jan. 13, 1834 pre-trial hearing at Painesville and his Apr. 2-3, 1834 State trial at Chardon. For more information on the Mormon Hodges see notes for the Gazette of June 9, 1845. Curtis also may have been the "Bro. Hodges" who brought "corroborating testimony" against Hurlbut at his second church court trial of June 23, 1833 at Kirtland. Thus, whether by plan or by coincidence, "President" Sidney Rigdon elevated to the highest levels of his church organization at least two of his former associates who had helped distance him from the Spalding claims for Book of Mormon authorship.


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  May 8, 1845.                         No. 235.



"PITTSBURGH  MORMONISM."

We use this term in contradistinction to "Nauvoo Mormonism," as it differs in some essential particulars, and is probably the more dangerous fanaticism of the two. We yesterday gave some account of the institution of the Church of the Pittsburgh branch of this modern heresy, but since then through the politeness of some of the Mormon leaders, we have been put in possession of a copy of each number of their periodical issued since SIDNEY RIGDON made his headquarters here last November. From these documents we have gleaned some additional facts, which may prove of some interest to our readers.

The Conference which was held in this city last month, was convened by a call from Sidney Rigdon. It was numerously attended, and resulted in the establishment of a branch of Mormonism entirely distinct from that at Nauvoo, and under a different name. That is called the "Church of the Latter Day Saints" -- this is denominated "the Church of Christ." They both, however acknowledge the "Book of Mormon" and the "Book of Covenants" as the Word of God, and as of equal authority with the Bible. The principal difference between them is, that the Pittsburgh Mormons, to their credit let it be spoken, repudiate and abjure the "spiritual wife system," the dogma that "it is sometimes lawful to lie," and assert the duty of obedience to the laws of the land.

The Government of the two sects is very similar. The principal Legislative body is called the "Quorum of Seventy-Three." This quorum is composed of those who have been ordained "prophets, priests and kings unto God." This quorum is now full, in the Pittsburgh branch, and sixty-two were present at the late Conference.

"The highest executive officer is called the "First President." Sidney Rigdon enjoys this office, and the manner in which he attained it, is so curious that we cannot but copy the account of it from the "Messenger" of the 15th of April. After the new Church had been organized, and the "Quorum of Seventy-Three" was full and had received the charge of the institutor, President Rigdon, who had been ordained by the Prophet Joe Smith himself, the account proceeds:

"The President then said -- the quorum was now full -- was organized agreeably to the pattern of heaven, and he had now so far done what God had commanded him, he therefore surrendered the control and management of the kingdom of God into their hands. I now throw myself into your arms. Now, what relation shall I sustain to this kingdom? What office shall I hold?

Whereupon Elder Joseph M. Cole arose and nominated Sidney Rigdon as first president of this kingdom and church, and to stand as prophet, seer, revelator and translator, to this church and kingdom of Christ of the last days, which was seconded. The vote was put by W. E. McLellin, one of the Secretaries, and carried by a unanimous vote; every member of the quorum standing on his feet. It was then put to the whole church, and was carried in the affirmative without one dissenting voive."

The new "First President" was then consecrated by each member of the Quorum coming forward, and taking him by the hand, and making a solemn pledge to "stand by jim and his family in all righteousness before God until the time of the end," and until they shall "meet the Son of God, on Mount Olivet, and the earth is redeemed." The "Messenger" says the scene was of a most impressive character.

United with the "First President" are two others, making what is called the "President's Quorum." the highest Court in the church. This is the quorum to which Regon belonged in Nauvoo, when Joe Smith was First President. The other bodies are the "Quorum of Twelve," the "High Council," the "Quorum of Elders," &c., almost too numerous to mention.

However, we have not time or inclination to pursue our inquiries into the government of this extraordinary sect of religious enthusiasts farther. The inglorious rise, and wonderful progress of this fanaticism, are, however, subjects for profound inquiry and philosophic research. Scarcely any thing parallel can be found in ancient or modern times, except it may be in Mohammedanism. Too little attention has been paid to this heresy by the religious public. It is, as far as we can learn. spreading further and more widely than people generally imagine.


Note: The Gazette's articles on Pittsburgh Mormonism (for the 7th and 8th of May) were reprinted in the Conneaut, Ohio Reporter's issues of May 15 and May 22, respectively. There must have been some considerable interest in the Rigdonite movement, by those the readers living along the eastern borders of the Mormons' old stronghold at Kirtland, for the Reporter of June 26th republished yet a third report upon this same topic, from the pages of the June 4, 1845 Pittsburgh Gazette.


 


Vol. XII.                     Tuesday  Morning,  June 3, 1845.                         No. 257.


 

CANNON FOR THE MORMONS. -- The last Warsaw Signal contains a letter from Medina, O., stating that the Mormons are getting twenty-four pieces of Ordinance cast in Cuyahoga county, O. It is said some of them are already cast and marked Nauvoo Legion.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  June 4, 1845.                         No. 258.



Pittsburgh  Mormonism.

This new phase in fanaticism continues to put forth remarkable supernatural revelations to astonish the ignorant and superstitious. The "Messenger and Advocate," the organ of the Branch of Mormonism in this city, is full of Rigdon's effusions, and letters from traveling missionaries abroad. He complains very much that his Church is confounded with that of the Twelve at Nauvoo, and insists that it is totally dissimiliar in every essential particular. He talks with detestation of their wickedness -- repudiates it entirely, and consigns it over to perdition; says the Twelve and their followers are hastening to destruction, and mentions particularly that in such abhorrence does the Church here hold the Nauvoo Mormons, they cannot be received without repentance, confession of their faith and baptism. He characterizes the Nauvoo Mormons as polygamists, liars, perjurers, coiners, counterfeiters, &c. -- quite a catalogue. It is clear enough from his account, that they are not at all responsible for the infamous expression of a wish in the Nauvoo Neighbor that "God who never errs, might sprinkle, upon every man and city that belies the saints, as upon Pittsburgh, now and then a hot drop!" The enmity between the two is excessively bitter.

In a letter from one Hutchins, dated at Boston, May 19th, we have another specimen of what, in our opinion, is blasphemy, not in legal, but in a moral sense. It appears that the converts from the old church had assembled under the direction of Hutchins to wash and anoint. When these ceremonies were performed, he says they entered into a covenant:

"And while in the attitude of this covenant, as we did at Conference, about to say amen, something appeared before me like a bright cloud, and my speech failed me, and my tongue began to flutter like a leaf among the leaves, and in this cloud there appeared to be a center, and in that center the Son of God; I did not see the whole form of a personage, but a glorious light, and I talked for some minutes in an unknown tongue, which I never knew, and my discourse seemed to be directed to this personage in the cloud. In a few minutes I found myself with my brethren amazed."

All this is told with an imperturbable coolness and will be received as Gospel by the members. It nearly rivals the famous revelations made by Rigdon himself, when the Church was organized. The cloud of madness is upon the minds of these deluded people.


Note: Although Rigdon's characterization of the Twelve at Nauvoo, (including the former Mormon leader at Pittsburgh, John E. Page) as polygamists or promoters of "spiritual wifery" had already begun to leak out from his followers and into the popular press, this article apparently marks the first time that the Pittsburgh Rigdonites were portrayed as battling against Nauvoo style polygamy. In the Gazette's article of May 8th, the Rigdonites were reported to"repudiate and abjure the 'spiritual wife system,' the dogma that 'it is sometimes lawful to lie...'" With the Gazette's publication of its June 4th article it became clear to Pittsburgh readers that Rigdon was joining previously published voices in accusing the leaders in Nauvoo of lying in order to conceal their secret polygamy. All the while, the Twelve at Nauvoo, along with all their spokesmen, continued to deny this was the case. Although Rigdon is careful to exclude the name of Joseph Smith, Jr. from his public attack on Mormon polygamy, in certain private communications he insinuates that Smith was a fallen prophet and a debauchee.


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  June 4, 1845.                                 No. 26.



MORMONISM  AND  CATHOLICISM.

In the "Pittsburgh Catholic" of the 10th inst., the late outrageous proceedings of Mr. Rigdon and the Mormon Conference in this city, are cited at some length, and with incredible perversity held up to the readers of that Journal as facts illustrative of the nature and dangerous tendency of the great Protestant principle of "Free Inquiry." The Catholic says:

In the Messenger and Advocate, the organ of the Mormon society in this city, we have the proceedings of the conference held on Wednesday, April 9, as follows:

"Afternoon, 2 o'clock. -- Conference met pursuant to adjournment, and was called to order by Austin Cowles; the first presidency of the high Quorum entered and took their seats. President Rigdon arose and read Hymn on page 104. "arise, arise, with joy survey," which was sung by the conference.

"After which, President Rigdon said, Since the commencement of this conference, I have had one unceasing desire, deep and intense; that was, to have the matter forever put at rest, whether God would accept our work. The Spirit whispered to me this morning to set apart some brethren, and consecrate them to God, in a room in my own house, which I did; (which was the reason I was not with you this morning,) and after the washing and anointing, the the Patriarchial seal as the Lord has directed me, we kneeled, and in solemn prayer we asked God to accept the work we had done; during the time of prayer there appeared over our heads, in the room, a ray of light forming a hollow square, inside of which, stood a company of heavenly messengers, each with a banner in his hand, with their eyes looking downward upon us, their countenances expressive of the deep interest they felt in what was then passing on the earth; there also appeared heavenly messengers on horseback with crowns upon their heads, and plumes floating in the air, dressed in glorious attire, until like Elisha, we cried in our hearts, 'the chariots of Israel, and the horsemen thereof;' even my little son of fourteen years of age saw the vision, and gazed with great astonishment, saying, that he thought his imagination was running away with him, after which we arose and lifting our hands to heaven in holy convocation to God, at which time, it was shown an angel in heaven, registering the acceptance of our work, and the decree of the Great God, that the kingdom is ours, and we shall prevail; my anxieties, therefore, in relation to our work in organizing the kingdom, and the acceptance of that organization, by our heavenly Father, is now forever at rest.

Elder Wm. E. McLellin, then arose and bore testimony to the manifestation of the power of God in the heavenly vision; he then gave the substance of a revelation given in the morning relative to the opening ceremony of the consecration, after which he kneeled and dedicated the conference by prayer. He then arose and said, 'brethren, I wish to say some things to you which will benefit you on the present occasion;' he set forth in a clear manner, the principles which constitute the fulness of human happiness, giving much important instruction in relation to it."

From the proceedings of the 10th, the day of our great fire, we learn that it was owing to the united prayer of the conference that "our city was saved from an entire overthrow."

"While we were thus," says the account, "organizing the kingdom of our God, and consecrating the officers thereof, to the Most High; our city was fast laying in ruins by the violence of fire; and our friends and neighbors in the midst of sorrow, distress and confusion, were flying for their lives, amidst the ragings of the devouring elements to places of safety, leaving their all to perish in the common ruin. In the closing prayer, for the adjournment, President Rigdon presented before the Lord the deep distress and great calamity which was then befalling the inhabitants of the city; presenting before the heavens the widow and the fatherless, and the sufferings and deep afflictions that were overwhelming our city; praying God to stay the violence of fire, that our whole city be not laid in ruins -- in which prayer the Conference joined with all the feelings of their soul. During this prayer, an escort of heavenly messengers that had hovered around as during the time of this Conference, were seen leaving the room, the course of the wind was instantly changed, and the violence of the flames were stayed, 'and our city saved from an entire overthrow.'"

The close of the proceedings is characterized by the same exhibition of fanaticism.

"The conference then stood upon their feet, with their hands lifted to heaven, and received the holy convocation: presenting the covenants which they had entered into, before God, and all the work they had done, asked God to register it in heaven, place his seal of approbation upon the great work they had done before him; which the Lord did, and bore testimony by his Spirit, that he had accepted their work, and placed his seal upon it.

"Elder J. M. Cole then related to the conference a vision of heaven, shown to him last fall, giving a history of all the important events which shall transpire in the world until the Savior comes."

So much for the Mormons; now for the commentary.

"We think," says the Catholic, "no one can read these extracts without being induced -- seriously to examine the merits of that principle which directly leads to the most unaccountable delusions -- that principle which rejecting the necessity and existence of an unerring guide, allows every man to follow whatever his reason may suggest as comfortable to revelation."

It would not be possible for enumerate here all the reasons that men have for writing sophistry. Some do it from perversity of heart, others from imbecility of head; some do it to blacken a good cause, and others to blanch a bad one. There are some also who do it from ignorance of what they oppose, and some from ignorance of what they would uphold. But we are no casuists, and certainly no "unerring guides;" and hence we affect not at all to divine the special reason why the Catholic penned the above sentence, but it is very certain, nevertheless, that it embodies one arrant sophism at least -- a petitie of the silliest sort -- namely, that the follies and delusions of Mr. Rigdon and the Mormon conference are legitimate results of some great Protestant principle. Now this we deny; and on the contrary affirm that Mormon extravagance is the result of a departure on the side of Mormons from all the great principles of Protestantism, and the embracing of that vicious and dangerous dogma of Romanism, viz: that there are other sources of faith, and other "unerring guides" besides the holy Bible and the holy apostles and prophets. Do Mormons plead the gospel on the principles of Protestantism? Do they affirm the following two maxims: --

1st, That the Bible, and the Bible only, contains the true religion?

2d, And that it is the inalienable right of all men to search the Bible for themselves? Verily they affirm no such things, but like Catholics they add to the word of God, and in almost all things like them, render it of no effect by their traditions. Do Mormons, like Protestants, reckon Christ and the apostles the center of unity? do they not rather like Catholics, select a very different official for their primordium unitatis? Are not both the Pope and the President revelators? Unerring, because inspired judges? Who will question the pretense of either? If a man takes the Bible, the whole Bible, and nothing but the Bible as the only standard and the only "unerring guide" in religion and piety, and religiously mainstains his right to read and study and decide for himself, he is a Protestant. But, if on the contrary, like Catholics, Mormons, and Mahometans, he embraces as the source of religious faith and manners, other books and other authorities, we do not judge him, but he is not a Protestant. The Mormons are not Protestants. They do not claim to be Protestants. They reckon us heathens as Catholics reckon us heretics! Their own rule, their own principle of departing from the sure and true word of God for other oracles, is the cause of all delusion and extravagance on the part of both Mormons and Catholics.

But we promise to show in this place, the Lord willing, that the extravagance and delusion of Catholicism are not yet outstripped by those of Mormonism.

So late as the beginning of the present reign, yea, only a few years ago, in France, the Bishop of Paris, trusting that the government of Louis Philippe might derive additional security from religion, set himself to devise a scheme for lighting up the long extinguished fires of devotion in the nation, and had recourse to the following artifice. Their own Abbe Le Guillon is the author of the narrative:

"Towards the end of the year 1830, a well born young female, a noviciate in one of those conservatories which are dedicated in Paris to the use of the poor and the sick.  *  *  *  Whilst in the midst of her fevor during her prayers, saw a picture representing the most Holy Virgin (as she is usually represented under the title of the Immaculate Conception,) standing with open extended arms; there issued from her hands rays of light like bundles, of a brightness which dazzled her; and amidst those bundles, or clusters of rays, she distinguished that some of the most remarkable fell upon a point of the globe which was under her eye. In an instant she heard a voice, which said, "These rays are symbolical of the graces which Mary obtains for men and this point on the globe on which they fall most copiously is France." According to this picture she read the following invocation, written in letters of Gold: -- "O, Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to you." Some moments after, this painting rurned round, and on the reverse she (the Estatica) distinguished the letter M, surmounted by a little cross, and below it the most sacred hearts of Mary and Jesus. After the young girl had well considered the whole, the voice said, "A medal must be struck, and the persons who wear it, and who shall say with devotion the inscribed short prayer, shall enjoy the special protection of the mother of God."

The Estatica of Paris now goes and relates the vision to her confessor, who regarded it as the mere effect of her juvenile imagination. Six months afterwards it was repeated, and the incredulous confessor gave no heed; but the third time (which was about the proper interval of another six months) the good man resolved to pay attention to the young noviciate, lest, he says, he might be displeasing her whom the church justly names "the refuge of sinners." He took the first opportunity of laying this important matter before the Archbishop of Paris, who declared at once the opinion that the medal ought to be struck forthwith. The fitst persons who had the privilege to wear it were the Sisters of Charity, and afterwards numbers were distrubuted among the children of the schools under their inspection; and an immense supply was ready against the invasion of the cholera! "It was soon spread," the Abbe Le Guillon tells, "in all the provinces of France, and in many foreign kingdoms; in Switzerland, in Poedmont, in Spain, in Belgium, in England! in the Levant, and as far as China."

"Finally," says out author, "from all parts er hear the most consoling facts. Priests full of the sporit of the Lord, tell us that these medals are reviving religious feeling in cities as well as country places. Vicars-General, who enjoy a well merited consideration, as well for their talents as for their piety, and even distinguished Bishops, inform us that 'they have reposed every confidence in these medals, and they regarded them as a means of providence for awakening the faith which had slept so long in this our age.'"

There: can Mormonism excel that? We need not say that both the Estatica and her marvellous medals are already consigned to oblivion. It would not work forever. The charm broke. The bubble burst. And it would have been as wise as the "Pittsburgh Catholic" to say that this Roman delusion grew out of Protestantism, as that the Mormon delusion did. No, the moment a man seeks to any other source of faith or revelation than the Bible, that moment he ceases to be a Protestant.    S.


Note 1: Although Elder Scott takes pains to disassociate Mormonism from "Protestantism," he fails to provide an origin for the "delusion." Scott previously charged Sidney Rigdon with having misappropriated key Campbellite religious tenents in creating Mormonism, but he did not elucidate much of Rigdon's pre-Mormon career (part of which had been spent in close company with Scott). In his Pittsburgh Messenger & Advocate for July, 1845, Elder Sidney Rigdon offered this non-response: "PROTESTANT UNIONIST. -- There have been placed upon our table, a few numbers of a paper, published in this city, called the "Protestant Unionist." What will come next? "Protestant Unionist!!" -- Queer enough. The Calvinst protest[s] against the Methodist, the Methodist against the Calvinist, the Pedo Baptist against the Baptist, the Baptist against the Pedo Baptist, the Unitarians against the Trinitarians, the Trinitarians against the Unitarians, the Universalists against the Partialists, the Partialists against the Universalists, and the Campbellites against all. These, we suppose, are the chords by which the union is strengthened. -- Will not the editor next favor the public with a Polynesian union? He will have no difficulty in proving that the land which compose the Polynesian Islands all belong to one world, and that they are situated in the Pacific ocean; and by the same process of reasoning by which he can prove the Protestants a unit, he can prove the Polynesian Islands all to be one Island. -- This is an age of discovery truly, in science, literature, politics, and religion, and we can see no reason why it should not be in geography also. Go ahead Mr. Editor, if you cannot prove the whole Protestant world a unit, you may obtain a little salt and potatoes by the operation."

Note 2: Sidney Rigdon appars to have been predisposed to either encountering heavenly messengers himself, or, at least keeping company with those latter day believers fortunate enough to experience angelic visitations. See the reports of J. J Moss and James Barr Walker, in regard to suspicious angelic visitations among the Saints. Not all witnesses to such providential manifestations were so easily impressed as the French Catholics or the American Mormons, of course. In the Book of First Nephi, the brothers of the author (Laman and Lemuel) complain about Nephi: "Now, he says that the Lord has talked to him and also that angels have ministered unto him. But behold, we know that he lies unto us; and he tells us these things, and he worketh many things by his cunning arts, that he may deceive our eyes."


 


Vol. XII.                     Monday  Morning,  June 9, 1845.                         No. 262.


 

Editorial Correspondence of the Pittsburgh Gazette.    
                           Warsaw, Ill, May 25, 1845.

Dear Junior: -- I arrived in this place on last Thursday, since which I have been too unwell to go out much. The only subject of conversation here, is the trial of the men indicted for the murder of Joe and Hiram Smith, which commenced at Carthage, the county seat of this county on last week. As the Sheriff is a JackMormon, and had selected the most of the Jury from among the Mormons, the Court set the panel aside, and appointed a special sheriff for the occasion, an Anti-Mormon, who presented the Jury, from which a committee of two, a Mormon and Anti-Mormon, selected the persons to try the gentlemen indicted, who also had the right of challenge. In this way after two days of challenging, a Jury was empannelled, and the hearing of witnesses was gone into. Two days in hearing witnesses had been spent, up to last Saturday night, and nothing at all elicited to condemn the accused. The trial will probably close about the middle of the week, and will result in the acquittal of the persons indicted. Should a different result follow, and conviction come, it will be the signal for a fierce and bloody outbreak. The people unanimously assert, that should the accused be found guilty, and the Sheriff attempt to lay hands upon them, they will rescue them in openn Court, and boldly declare that they shall not be molested; and if the Mormons attempt to assist the Sheriff, as would probably be the case, war will be immediately carried into Nauvoo. Great crowds attend the trial, so that this place is almost deserted. If the men are acquitted, and the Mormons keep quiet, things will probably go on in their present manner, until some other cause for outbreak shall arise. The Mormons are somewhat cowed down at present, as some of the foul murders and robberies lately committed in this section have been traced to them, and they dread the fierceness of public indignation. A great many midnight robberies have lately taken place in Lee county, Iowa, directly opposite Nauvoo, on the west side of the Mississippi; and the Mormons justly suspected of their perpetration. About two weeks ago, in an attempted midnight robbery of a family of newly arrived German emigrants, one man was killed, and another almost hacked to pieces with bowie knifes. The robbers made their escape from their bloody work, but were traced to Nauvoo, and two of them, named Hodges, both Mormons, and one an Elder, were arrested and lodged in Jail to await trial. The third robber has so far eluded detectives. When the Mormons found that these men had been traced to the "holy city," they gave them up to avoid the effects of public indignation. If they had not done so, the people of Lee county would have attacked Nauvoo with a large force of determined men, which they were prepared to do.

As far as I can learn, the Mormons neither increase or diminish much. There are great dissensions among them, and many withdraw and leave them, but their loss is made up by new comers. Rigdon has a very considerable party in Nauvoo, though they are compelled to remain quiet, and considerable hopes are entertained by the people here, that Rigdon will be able to draw off a large party, and thus weaken the "Twelveites," as the rulers at Nauvoo are called. It is not surprising that the Anti-Mormons, as the people here who are not Mormons denominated, are exasperated against the Mormons, as they are ruined by their contiguity to that fanatical and knavish people. Previous to the exodus of the Mormons from Missouri to this county, it was in a high state of prosperity' property was increasing in price, business was brisk, and the population rapidly increasing. Now every thing is changed. -- property has fallen 75 per cent. The population is diminishing rather than increasing, as every one is leaving who can, and there is no prospect of better days. Those who have invested their all here, and cannot get away, will of course feel in no very amiable mood towards those who have been the means of their ruin. There is great alarm therefore, of a violent outbreak before long, unless the Mormons fall out among themselves, and scatter away. It is a most unhappy state of society, and one which, while it draws off all desireable emigrants, has a tendency to excite to exasperation all those who are compelled to stay here. I will write again when the result of the trial is known. Yours, &c.,   D. N. W.


Note 1: This letter was written by Pittsburgh Gazette Editor, David Nye Waite, Sr., to his son at the editorial offices back home. The second half of this report was published on June 13, 1845. See also Waite's Sep. 15, 1843 publication of his interview with Joseph Smith, Jr. at Nauvoo.

Note 2: The two Mormon Hodges arrested for the murder committed in Iowa were William and Stephen Hodges. They were later tried (see Gazette of July 7th) and executed for the bloody deed. Subsequently, their brother Irvine Hodges was murdered in Nauvoo and died practically upon Brigham Young's back doorstep. According to notes in William Shepard's "Mormon Banditti," the parents of these three ruffians "had joined Rigdon... parents lived in Pittsburgh." According to an 1846 report made by Apostle William Smith, a fourth brother was murdered "by Brigham Young's guard" and the father off all four was "Amos Hodge." More likely their father was the same Curtis Hodges whom Rigdon had ordained as one of his high priests in Pittsburgh on April 9, 1845. At any rate, Rigdon could not have been too happy to see this criminal news appear in Waite's letter, alongside of the report saying many of the Mormons in Nauvoo were secret Rigdonites.


 


Vol. XII.                     Tuesday  Morning,  June 10, 1845.                         No. 263.



The editor of the Nauvoo Neighbor says:

"The glory, honor and blessings of Nauvoo, if we are left alone, will be felt round the globe. Already good men see it Why? -- a mean man or a Rigdonite, feels his own nothingness in the presence of the saints, and melts in the glance of the Lord 'like the first frost of fall.'"

Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Friday  Morning,  June 13, 1845.                         No. 266.


 

Editorial Correspondence of the Pittsburgh Gazette.    
                           Warsaw, Ill, May 31, 1845.

Dear Junior: -- The trial of the gentlemen indicted for the murder of Joe Smith, which has been the all-absorbing subject of interest in this community for two weeks back, has come to a close, and has resulted in the acquital of all the defendants. The Jury were only out about five minutes, when they returned a verdict of not guilty. Indictments are still pending against the same gentlemen, for the murder of Hyram Smith, which are to be tried at aspecial Court held on the 24th of June. A like result must follow, unless more witnesses can be suborned, as the circumstances are precisely similar in both cases, and if they are not guilty in one case, they cannot be in the other.

The result of this trial has given great satisfaction to the people of this county unconnected with the Mormons, while to the latter it is a source of great chagrin, and no little excitement reigns among them in consequence. It is hoped by the people here, that the Mormons, seeing they cannot intimidate and brow-beat and oppose those who are determined to stand up for their rights, will consent to disband and leave the country. This would be matter of universal rejoicing. Those unacquainted with the state of Society in a Mormon neighborhood, cannot conceive of the trials and difficulties to which community is subjected, and the low state of morals among the rising generation consequent on Mormon teaching. I could relate facts which would astound the public, but they are not of a character fit for the public eye. The young people among the Mormons are growing up in infidelity and are in the indulgence of the most degrading vices. The conduct and teachings of their seniors have destroyed in their hearts all faith in any revelation whatever, and has early inducted them into the practice of every thing evil.

While this state of affairs exists among the Mormons themselves, the lives and property of the "Gentiles" as they call all persons not Mormons, living in their midst or in the neighborhood, are always in danger. An instance which has just occurred will show you, on what precarious terms aÊ"Gentile" holds property in Nauvoo. Sometime since, a merchant, not a Mormon, established himself in that city for the purpose of following his business. He hoped by saying nothing to offend the prejudices of any one, and by leading a quiet, peaceful life, to be permitted to dwell in peace. For sometime he got along quite well, but finally a system of annoyance was commenced, for which he could obtain no release, until he was compelled to resolve to leave. For that purpose he boxed up his stock of goods, and other property, and deposited them in a Warehouse preparatory to shipment. He then went to Madison, a few miles above, in order to intercept a boat, and make an arrangement to ship his goods to some port below. On returning to Nauvoo for his goods, the Merchant found every thing had vanished -- not a box or the least article could be founf, or the least trace of them. Nobody knew any thing about them, nor would any of the police of Nauvoo assist him in ferreting out the thieves. All the man could do was to submit to his loss in silence. Such is the state of society in that city of "Saints" or rather fanatical thieves, No "Gentile" who wishes to preserve his property would venture to bring it within the reach of the thieving saints.

It is impossible that this state of affairs can exist without producing some fearful outbreak, which will finally be the result. Even, if the old inhabitants if the county should agree to relinquish their homes and property, and leave the Mormons in undisputed possession, yet it would not mend the matter much. The same difficulties would exist with the people of adjoining counties and fierce conflicts be the consequence. What will be the final result of this modern heresy, which partakes so largely of the nature of Mohammedanism, time only will develope, but that it will be fearfully disasterous can hardly be doubted. I shall leave for home in a day or two.

Adieu till then.           D. N. W.



THE MORMONS are either greatly abused, or are very desperate and criminal. We must remember, however, that nearly all the accounts that reach us concerning them, come from their opponents. --   Phila. Inquirer.


Note: David Nye Waite, Sr.'s first 1845 article from Warsaw was published in the Pittsburgh Gazette on June 9th. Waite published a follow-up report on June 19th; he is not known to have made any further reports from that region of the country in 1846 or 1847.


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  June 11, 1845.                                 No. 27.



The  Pittsburgh  Catholic.

After the pompous flourish, with which the Catholic tendered to us an issue for discussion, and after we had given him another opportunity, accompanied with a special invitation to meet our argument in support of the Divine inspiration of the Old Testament Scriptures, the following is his reply:

"Our neighbor of the 'Protestant Unionist' seems to be quite indignant that we did not give a formal reply to his article of last week; he appears, however, to have altogether forgotten the nature of the task which he took upon himself to accomplish. We thought he undertook to prove the inspiration, not of a portion of the scriptures, but of the entire Protestant Bible. -- When he tells us that he has done so we will be ready to meet his reasoning. Perhaps the editor saw the difficulty of proving, conclusively, the insporation of the New Testament, independently of the authority of the church. But let him give us at least the hacknewed argumnets on the subject -- the sublime character of the sacred writings, the fact of their containing propjecies, &c., that we may have a full view of his entire force before he calls upon us to begin any counter-movements. We assure him we do not mean him any insult by telling him that we chould give our opinions of his proofs, and if that does not satisfy him, we promise to give our reasons for those opinions."

The above paragraph contains a tacit admission that we have sustained our position, so far as the Old Testament Scriptures are concerned. The Catholic plainly confesses his inability to meet our argument in support of that part of our proposition; and, now, only pretends to assert our inability to prove the Divine inspiration of the Old Testament portion of the Bible as an established point, no longer in discussion between ourselves and the Catholic. We shall preceed, the Lord willing, in our next number to complete our task by presenting our proof of the inspiration of the New Testament.

The Catholic has offered to give his opinion of the value of our proofs, after we shall have presented them. We assure him that his opinion, however conclusive it may be with his readers, will be of no account with us or our readers. We want facts and arguments, and not his opinions: if he fail to produce these, sufficient to refute our proposition, he will stand defeated and silenced on an issue which he has chosen to tender, in the view of the Protestant Community, to whom we appeal.


Note: The editors of the Unionist appear to have forgotten their paper's previous assertions on the subject of Mormonism and Catholicism -- at least they chose to drop the matter and say nothing more about it.


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  June 19, 1845.                         No. 271.



THE  MORMONS  OF  NAUVOO.

There has been manifested a disposition on the part of the sober, law-abiding part of the community, to judge [-----ly] of the proceedings of the inhabitants of Hancock county, Illinois, in which Nauvoo is situated, in their resistance to the encroachments and theiving propensities of the Mormons. The conduct of the Anti-Mormons has been looked upon more as a crusade against the Mormon's religious faith, and a persecution of a harmless and fanatical people, than as an attempt to defend and preserve their own lives and property. Were the true state of the case understood, this judgment would be immediately reversed, and the Anti-Mormons of Hancock county be pronounced as patient and forbearing under the infliction of the direct evils, as any community in the United States. The fact is, had Hancock county been settled, as Missouri is, with emigrants principally from Kentucky, Virginia and Tennessee, the Mormons would have been driven off or exterminated long ago; but the inhabitants being, most of them, from the free states, with quite a large population from New England, and educated in the strictest regard and reverence for the laws, they approach with dread any infraction of their letter, even in self-defense, and when no other recourse is left.

Warsaw, a town on the Mississippi, below Nauvoo, where the principal organized opposition to Mormonism exists, and which forms a rallying point for the Anti-Mormons, has been considered by some well-meaning people, little better than as a quiet, peaceable and intelligent little community. A stranger on becoming acquainted with the inhabitants, would find as refined, sociable, intelligent and well-disposed a community, as in any other town of the size in the United States. Very many of the inhabitants, quite a large proportion, belong to the Presbyterian, Congregational and Methodist churches. The Presbyterians have a beautiful little church, and a regular Pastor, the Rev. Mr. Groot, a gentleman of amiable manners and sterling piety, and indefatigable in the duties of his profession. Such is the character of a community which is charged with all sorts of outrages in relation to Mormonism.

To show our readers some of the insufferable difficulties the Anti-Mormons of Hancock county have to labor under, we will state a few favts which took place while we were in Warsaw, during last month. It was during the session of the Circuit Court for that county, which meets every six months, and has cognizance of both criminal and civil cases. It was at this court that the gentlemen indicted by a Mormon Grand Jury, at the instigation of Gov. Ford, for the murder of Joe Smith, were tried for their lives and acquitted. These gentlemen, all of them, reside in Warsaw, and were not chosen by the Mormons for prosecution because they had any evidence of their guilt, but because they were most obnoxious to the "Saints," and were men of standing and influence. These men had been harrassedfor the last six months by a Mormon Sheriff, with warrants to consign them to jail, as the offence for which they were indicted was not [returnable], and they were finally acquitted, not so much because there was not a particle of evidence to convict them, as because the impartial Judge of the Court set aside the traverse jurors selected by the Mormon Commissioners, deposed the Jack-Mormon Sheriff for the time being, and apointed [E-----s] to select a jury for this special case. This was the only mode of securing justice. But it was not of this we intended explicitly to speak, but of other matters which took place at the same court.

The Grand Jury was composed of twenty-one persons, selected by the Mormon Commissioners and Sheriff, and consisted of eleven Mormons and ten Anti-Mormons; care being always taken to keep the power in Mormon hands. No criminal case, as is well known, could come before the Court, but such as passed the ordeal of this sacred tribunal, which has always been dear to a free people, as an independent safe guard of their rights. How well these rights were protected the sequel will show. We will mention a few of the cases which come before this body, and the justice awarded, as a sample of the whole. Among the inhabitants presented was one against a Mormon Elder, in good standing among the "Saints," for rape upon one, and incest with another, of his own daughters, and the mother and daughters were before the Grand Jury and testified to the facts, which were notorious in the community, yet the cloven Mormon Grand Jurors threw out the bill. This hoary-headed libel on humanity then presented an indictment against a number of young men, Anti-Mormons, in his neighborhood, (he resided some distance from Nauvoo,) for lynching him for these very crimes. In which they had laid on some thirty of forty lashes pretty severely, and the Mormon Grand Jurors found a true bill.

In another case, an indictment was presented against a Mormon for giving sanction to, and putting in circulation fraudulent notes by which a gross fraud was committed on the community in a manner the most difficult to guard against. Abundant evidence was brought to prove the charge, but the Mormon sages on the Grand Jury hit upon a most unheard of mode of dispensing justice. They sent for their guilty brother, brought him before them, and permitted him to swear himself guiltless of the charge, and quashed the indictment. To crown all, when the Mormons on the Grand Jury found that indictments were preparing to be preferred against their brethren who had testified on the trial of the persons indicted for the murder of the Smiths, for purjery, and whom the Prosecuting Attorney acknowledged to be guilty, they suddenly and unexpectedly adjourned sine die, before the business was near finished. We would recite other outrages perpetrated by the Grand Jury, but the above will suffice.

Who will deny, then, that the people, the Anti-Mormons, of Hancock county exercise the most unheardof forbearance, when they permit such atrocities to go unpunished, and see their dearest rights trampled in the dust, rather than [----- ---] violate any laws of the land! It is evident that the law is unable to protect them -- that they can obtain no redress for any injuries or injustice to person or property -- and it is hard to ask them to respect laws which are only made the means of their oppression. Still they forbear, and wait for greater outbreaks; but fearful will be the day of reckoning, when this long-suffering people shall arise, in desperation, to assert the supremacy of law, and restore their down trodden rights.


Note: This third article by Editor David Nye Waite, Sr. supplements his previous two letters, written to the readers of the Gazette from Warsaw, Illinois and published on June 9th and on June 13th.


 


Vol. XII.                     Thursday  Morning,  June 20, 1845.                         No. 272.


 

The last number of the "Nauvoo Neighbor," the organ of the Mormons, gives the following description of the putting on the capstone of the Temple:

THE CAPSTONE OF THE TEMPLE: -- On the morning of the 24th, a little past six, a goodly number of Saints had the honor and glory to witness the Capstone of the Temple laid in its place. The morning was cool, clear, and beautiful; the Saints felt glorious, the band upon the top of the wall played charmingly, and when the stone was placed, there was a united Hisanna to God and the Lamb, amen and amen shouted three times, which not only gave joy on earth, but filled the heavens with gladness. A new hymn, composed for the occasion was then sung. The first verse of which is:

Have you heard the revelation
Of this latter dispensation,
Which is unto every nation,
O prepare to meet thy God!

Chorus -- We are a band of brethren
            And we've reared the Lord a temple,
            And the capstone now is finish'd
            And we'll sound the news abroad.

It was justly remarked that Saturday was the Jewish Sabbath, and that God finished his work on that day and rested and so may the saints. Another great coincidence is that this was the ascension week of Jesus -- and, setting aside the narrow calculations of the world concerning "Holy Thursday," this was actually the end of the week, and as the prophet said -- the headstone was brought forward with shouting'grace unto it' -- and peace to the saints.


Note: The hazy wording of this reprinted article may give the impression that the nauvoo Temple construction was completed that day and that the Mormons may "rest" from that labor. In fact, much of the interior work remained to be finished -- and never was finished, prior to the destruction of the building by fire several months later.


 


Vol. XII.                     Tuesday  Morning,  June 24, 1845.                         No. 275.


 

MORMON PETITION. -- In the Connecticut Legislature, on the 31st ult., says the Hartford Courant, a message was received from his Excellency, the Governor, accompanied by a communication from Brigham Young, and others, "a committee of the Latter Day Saints," at Nauvoo -- otherwise called Mormons -- asking for Asylum in Connecticut, or for aid in obtaining one elsewhere. They claim to be [law-pr-----ing] citizens, and say Illinois has treated them as bad as Missouri. The former "pounced upon their patriarch and their prophet, repealed their chartered rights," &c. They say that many citizens of Connecticut are among them -- and request the Governor to convene a special session of the Legislature to grant them an asylum, and to aid in establishing a colony of "Latter Day Saints in Oregon." The message was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Monday  Morning,  July 7, 1845.                         No. 285.



Conviction of the Hodges -- Murder in Nauvoo --
Murder in Carthage.

Correspondence of the Missouri Republican.

WARSAW, Ills., June 24th, 1845.       

Messrs. Editors. -- To-day the Court for the trial of the persons indicted for the murder if Hyrum Smith commenced. Nothing was done in the case. A circumstance, however, occurred, which has filled this community with gloom. The reports which have justvreached me from Carthage are these: That a slight altercation occurred between Minor R. Deming, sheriff of this county, and Dr. S. Marshall, which resulted in the death of the latter, by a pistol shot fired by the sheriff.

Dr. Marshall was a man who stood high in the community -- distinguished for his peaceable disposition and correct deportment in all his intercourse with his fellow men -- and has filled some of the most important offices in the county; and his death has naturally created great excitement, and the person by whose hands he has fallen having rendered himself already very obnoxious to the people of the county by his course, I should not be at all surprised if it led to other and more important results.

We have reports from Burlington, Iowa, that two of the Hodges, indicted for the murder of the Germans, in Lee county, have been convicted, and sentenced to be hung on the 15th day of July next. The stage sriver from Nauvoo, this morning, reports that another of the brothers of the Hodges was murdered in the streets of Nauvoo, the previous evening, having been stabbed in four places by an unknown hand -- whether he was concerned with his brothers in the murder in Lee county, and this was an act of revenge, I am unable to say, but presume it grew out of this transaction....



MURDER IN NAUVOO. -- On Monday night last, a man by the name of Hodges, brother to the men recently convicted at Burlington, was stabbed in Nauvoo, and died in a few hours.

The circumstances, as detailed to us, are as follows:

During the course of the trial at Burlington, a man by the name of Walker, stated on the witness stand, that there was a gang of robbers about Nauvoo, who had made ocertures to him to join them, and implicated the two Hodges, who were under trial, and also their brothers living in Nauvoo.

The officers immediately started to arrest the Hodges, which they did about twelve o'clock on Monday night. After the arrest, a man called the brother of the man who was arrested, but, and as soon as he stepped out of the room, stabbed him so severely, that he died of the wound in a few hours.

On being asked by his mother if he knew who had stabbed him, he is said to have replied "Yes, it was one of my best friends." This is all that is known in relation to the matter. It is however, suspected that one of the gang, being fearful that he would turn State's evidence, did the deed. The Hodges who was stabbed resided a short time at Mechanicsville, in this county.

P. S. Another statement -- and which we presume is nearer correct -- is that Hodges had just returned from Burlington, where he had been to testify on behalf of his brothers, and that he was murdered to prevent his making disclosures, which he is said to have threatened. -- Warsaw Signal, 25th.


The Hodges mentioned above, are the persons referred to in one of our letters from the west, as having attempted to rob a German family, in Lee county, Iowa, and murdered one man, and horribly mutilated another in the attempt. They are Mormons, one an elder. The trial came to a close in Burlington, on Saturday night, the 21st ult. On Sunday morning, the Court met to receive the verdict of the jury, and the accused were both pronounced guilty of murder. They have been sentenced to execution on the 15th of this month.


Note: See the notes for the Gazette article of June 9, 1845 for more information on William, Stephen, Irvine, and Amos Hodges and their Rigdonite parents -- who were then living in Pittsburgh.


 


Vol. XII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  July 9, 1845.                         No. 287.


 

THE MORMON TRIALS. -- The extra term of the Hancock County (Illinois) Circuit Court for the trial of the indictment against the persons charged with the murder of Hyrum Smith, Joe's brother, was appointed for Tuesday the 24th of June, at Carthage. We learn from the St. Louis Republican, that the Court accordingly met, and remained in session until Wednesday morning; when no person appearing in behalf of the State to prosecute the indictment, the Judge ordered the case to be stricken from the docket, remarking that, inasmuch as neither the prosecuting attorney, nor the agent of the State, who prosecuted the first indictment, had thought proper to attend, although officially notified of the time of holding court, he would decline appointing a prosecutor. The accused were all present and desired a trial preferring a verdict of acquiital from a jury, and having the matter thoriughly put to rest. Nearly one hundred witnesses were summoned on the part of the State.

In the case of Deming, for killing Dr. Marshall, the Grand Jury, summoned immediately after the committed act, returned an indictment for murder. On the 28th, the prisoner appeared in Court, and asked to be admitted to bail.

He was required to give bail in the sum of $5000. The bail had not been given when last heard from.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  July 16, 1845.                         No. 293.


 

FOURTH OF JULY IN NAUVOO. -- The St. Louis New Era has been informed by a gentleman who spent the birth day of American Independence in that city of fanatics, that no notice whatever was taken of it; the usual bsiness of the place was carried on without interruption; a large number of persons were at work on their holy temple.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  July 16, 1845.                             No. 32.


 

THE MORMONS, according to a western newspaper, are providing themselves with heavy munitions of war, having lately contracted for twenty-four pieces of ordinance, to be cast in Cuyahoga Co., Ohio.



MORMONS. -- The Temple is finished at Nauvoo. -- Other public buildings are to go up, and for them contributions of money, -- property and labor will be asked. The rulers are now planning a great hotel, the Nauvoo House, and that, hereafter, says the St. Louis Era, will be the subject of their mendicant demands on the body of their followers. When men are so far under the influence of religious teachers that they no longer know that their souls are their own, they become hewers of wood, and drawers of water for the basest ends. -- Cin. Gaz.



The special term of the Hancock Circuit Court appointed to try the persons indicted for the murder of Hyram Smith, was held, and no witnesses or prosecutors appeared, and a nolle prosequi was entered and the defendants discharged.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TIOGA  [   ]  EAGLE.

Vol. ?                        Wellsborough, Pa., Wednesday, July 30, 1845.                           No. ?



Nauvoo.

The Warsaw Signal contains numerous statements of violence in or about Nauvoo. Irvine Hodges was murdered there -- he said his best friend killed him, yet gave no name. The Signal thinks he gave the name but it was suppressed. William Backenstos, late Sheriff of Hancock, has been ordered to leave the holy city. He is accused of being the correspondent of the Warsaw Signal. Patriarch Bill Smith, of Nauvoo, brother of the Prophet, whose wife died about four weeks since, was again married recently -- having been a widower about 18 days. His bride is about 16 years of age, and he is 35. The split among the Nauvoo Saints is growing wider. Bill Smith heads one party, the twelve disciples the other.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  September 23, 1845.                         No. 43.


 

MORE TROUBLE WITH THE MORMONS. -- Our correspondent at Warsaw sent us by the La Clede, which arrived this morning, the following account of serious out-breaks between the Mormons and their opponents in Hancock county. -- St. Louis Republican.

WARSAW, 11th September, 1845.
                  10 o'clock, A. M.

Messers. Editors: On Tuesday morning last (9th inst.,) an attack was made on a school house in Rocky [Road?] Precinct, by some persons unknown, but supposed to be Mormons, in which there was at the time of the attack a convention of Anti-Mormons, or old settlers of the county. The door and windows of the house were completely riddled by the shot fired by the assailants. The attacking party approached under cover of the wood and bushes, and fired one round and fled. No persons were injured, but many were, I presume, much frightened at the sudden and unexpected assault. The old settlers in that section of the county, armed themselves for defence and if they are backed by their friends in other parts of the county, blood will flow. By a messenger just in, who came to purchase lead, powder, flints, &c., I learn that four buildings were burned down last night, and one man shot, and very badly wounded, but not mortally. Yesterday thirteen wagons loaded with furniture, were seen wending their way to the City of Refuge, (Nauvoo.)


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Thursday  Morning,  September 25, 1845.                         No. 45.



THE  MORMON  WAR.

We give to-day copious extracts in relation to the fearful civil war now raging in Hancock and Adams counties, Illinois. From a very general acquaintance with the people of Hancock county, and the state of affairs there, we have duly looked for account of such scenes as are now enacting. The situation of affairs in that county, for the Anti-Mormons, or old inhabitants, is absolutely intolerable. The only remedy is to move off, and leave their farms, villages and towns, or to drive the Mormons off. Nobody will come in to purchase their property but Mormons, and they are too poor, and prefer, many of them, to live by depredations. Either the inhabitants of the county who settled it before the Mormons came in , and who were then in a highly prosperous condition, must leave the county at the sacrifice of everything, or the mormons must go. To live together is impossible. We would as soon live in the neighborhood of a clan of wild Arabs, as in that of an ignorant, fanatical, thieving, and clannish Mormon settlement.

To such of our readers as are unacquainted with the Geography of the seat of war, we may say, that Adams and Hancock counties are situated on the Mississippi river, from 140 to 180 miles above St. Louis. The city of Quincy is the chief town in Adams county, and Warsaw the principal town on the river in Hancock county, with the exception of Nauvoo, which is the largest town probably in Illinois. Hancock is immediately north of Adams county, and lays partly opposite Missouri and partly opposite Iowa. --

Warsaw is situated on the river, almost 12 miles from the Adams county line. Nauvoo is situated on the river, about 18 miles above Warsaw, and about 14 miles from the Northern brder of the county. Between the two places are the well-known Des Moines, or Lower Rapids of the Mississippi. Carthage, the county seat of Hancock, is situated in the center of the county, and about equally distant from Warsaw and Nauvoo, about 18 miles from each. The country, from 2 to 3 miles back from the river, is nearly all rooling prairie, with occasional groves. Three fourths of the county we should think is without timber. This is the reason that the smoke of the burning houses can be seen so far, as the settlements are scattered over the prairies. Lima, the present seat of the war, is situated in the southern part of Hancock county, almost 20 miles from Warsaw, and about the same from Carthage, and about 30 to 35 from Nauvoo. Morley's settlement of Mormons, in the neighborhood of Lima, is partly in Hancock and partly in Adams county.

Our readers will thus see that the war is not in the neighborhood of Nauvoo, but in a settlement surrounded principally by the old citizens. In passing from Lima to Nauvoo, there are large settlements of Anti-Mormons, until you come within about 6 miles of Nauvoo, where the country is altogether settled by Mormons. Nauvoo contains about 18,500 inhabitants, and is pretty well built of brick, and the inhabitants are well armed. A war which will drive off these men will be as child's play.

For the latest news of the Mormon war see next page.



From the St. Louis Republican, Sept. 17.

THE CIVIL WAR IN ILLINOIS. -- We have already given to our readers such information from the seat of civil war and commotion in Adams and Hancock counties, Illinois, as we have been able to obtain. A long letter in the Quincy Daily Courier of Monday last, confirms all that has been published in regard to the pretended origin of the difficulties -- the firing upon a meeting of anti-Mormons near Lima, assembled to consult upon measures to protect their property from the depredations of the Mormons. That such an attack was made, without injury to any one, is admitted to be true, but, while the anti-Mormon party charge it upon the Mormons, the latter allege that it was a trick of the former, to secure a pretext for the depredations they are now making.

The meeting, at all events broke up in a hurry, escaping out of doors and windows, and some of them leaving their hats behind them. On Wednesday and Thursday, after brief warning to the occupants, the burning of the dwellings of the Mormons commenced. On Friday, other houses were fired. In the course of that day, a committee of Mormons, with a flag of truce, entered Lima, to treat with their enemies. Captain Newton volunteered to introduce them to some citizens of Hancock county, and did so. They met in council -- Edson Whitney, Joel Catlin, and Samuel Fleming, representing the anti-Mormons, informing them at the same time that they were not authorized by the public to do any thing, but acted on their own responsibility. -- Thry were ready, however, to receive any proposition tending to allay the excitement. The following proposition was then submitted:

ADAMS COUNTY, Sept. 12, 1845.      

"We, the undersigned, a Committee appointed by the Morly and Hancock settlements, (a branch of the Mormon church.) Whereas, as they seeming to be some difficulty between said body and the anti-Mormons, we, as representatives of said body, wish to make some propositions so as to make peace. We wish to sell our deeded lands as well also as our improvements, as low as it could be reasonably expected -- reserving to ourselves the crops now on the premises -- and will take in exchange, working cattle, beef cattle, cows, sheep, horses, wagons and harness, store goods, and any available property and give possession as soon as our crops can be taken off, and receive pay for the same, the whole of which may be purchased from the undersigned, acting as committee, or from the respective owners.

DANIEL TYLER,
HORACE S. HAWSON,
MARCELLUS McKOWAN,
SAMUEL ALGER."
Mr. Whitmer remarked to the committee that ge believed their petition would be unsatisfactory in the particular that if he had to buy out a bad neighbor to get rid of him, he would like to know what distance he would remove from him. The committee replied they would not agree to leave Hancock, nor would they say in what part of that county they would again settle. It is useless, perhaps, to add that the interview amounted to nothing and the work of destruction commenced again that evening. On (today) Saturday, several more buildings were burned. In passing along a road about three quarters of a mile distant, almost three o'clock, I saw the smoke and flames of two rising upon the air. On arriving at Lima I ascertained the buildings were situated about a mile and a half from that place. Many men were collected in groups in the streets, and the doors and windows of the houses were filled with women and children looking in silent despair upon the work of the destroying element. Where the work of destruction will stop, God only knows. The feeling is deep and intense, and the excitement continually spreading. Up to Friday morning, as near as I could ascertain, twenty-three buildings were burned. During last night and today, the number is [probably swelled] to thirty, or perhaps more. The party engaged in the work go undisguised, in broad day light, and [the torch]. So far no one has been injured, nor has any property, I was told, been destroyed but the houses except by accident. Sparks from some of the buildings fell upon a few grain stacks, which ignited and were consumed.

The party which first commenced the work of destruction did not amount to more than twenty or thirty. What the number is now cannot be ascertained. The anti-Mormons not engaged in the burning are collecting and preparing to act upon the defensive. I understand a meeting of anti-Mormons was to be held at Carthage to-day. What it will amount to time will determine. The Mormons are encamped about three miles from where the scene of destruction first commenced. Their numbers on Friday was variously estimated from one to three hundred, but an hour's time may greatly swell their ranks. Both parties are well armed, and all the anti-Mormons with whom I conversed expressed the belief that the work of destruction could not be stayed until the Mormons were driven into Nauvoo. Time will either confirm or negative this belief.

Meanwhile, we have from Nauvoo the following proclamation of the Sheriff of Hancock county:

PROCLAMATION.

To the Citizens of Hancock County. -- Whereas a mob of from one to two hundred men, under arms, having gathered themselves together in the south west part of Hancock county, and are at this time destroying the dwellings and other buildings, stacks of grain and other property, of a portion of our citizens, in the most inhuman manner, compelling defenceless children and women to leave their sick beds and exposing them to the rays of the parching sun, there to lay and suffer without the aid or assistance of a friendly hand to minister to their wants, in their suffering condition.

The rioters spare not the widow nor the orphan, and while I am writing this proclamation, the smoke is rising to the clouds and the flames are devouring four buildings which have just been set on fire by the rioters. Thousands of dollars worth of property has already been consumed, an entire settlement of about sixty or seventy families laid waste, the inhabitants thereof are fired upon, narrowly escaping with their lives, and forced to flee before the ravages of the mob.

By the revised laws of our State under the criminal code, sixth division, 59 section, page 184, the crime of arson is defined as follows, "Every person who shall wilfully and maliciously burn or cause to be burned, any dwelling house, kitchen, utility shop, barn, stable, store house, &c., &c., shall be deemed guilty of arson, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by imprisonment in the penitentiary for a term of not less than one year, nor more than ten years, and should the life or lives of any person be lost in consequence of any such [offense aforesaid]. such offender shall be guilty of murder, and shall be indicted and punished accordingly."

And whereas, thr Laws of the State make it my duty as a peace officer of this county to suppress all [riots, mobs], &c., &c., and all other crimes

Therefore, I, J. B. Backenstos, sheriff of the county of Hancock, and state of Illinois in the name of the people of said state and by the authority vested in me in virtue of my office, hereby solemnly command the said rioters and other peace breakers to desist forthwith, disperse, and go to their homes, under the penalty of the laws; and I hereby call upon the law abiding citizens, as a posse comitatus of Hancock County of Hancock county to give their united aid in suppressing the rioters, and maintain the supremacy of the law.

J. H. Backenstos, Sheriff of Hancock, co., Ill.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Monday  Morning,  September 29, 1845.                         No. 48.


 

... One of the editors of the St. Louis Republican, who is at the seat of the war, has been endeavoring to effect a compromise in some way between the parties.

Between 250 and 400 Mormons were out in arms under Backenstos, the Sheriff. The editor concludes his letter thus:

"My own belief is, that, although the Mormons have now in the field the strongest party, and have excited considerable fears in the ranks of the Anties, that the latter will yet rally, and carry the warfare further than it has yet been carried. They will, if it is renewed, attempt to avenge the deaths of Worrell and McBratney. Symtoms of trouble were manifesting themselves at Keokuk, I. T., when I left. The citizens of the township had resolved that the Mormons should not live in the township, and they had sent a petition to the Governor requesting him to have all removed."...


Note: The above exerpt was from a letter which appeared in the Missouri Republican of about Sept. 20th.


 


Vol. XIII.                     Tuesday  Morning,  September 30, 1845.                         No. 49.



THE  MORMON  WAR.

The following interesting letter is from the editor of the St. Louis Republican, written just as he was leaving Warsaw for St. Louis.

WARSAW, Sept, 18, 1845.      

In my letter of yesterday, I did not allude to the death of one of the anti-Mormons, named Samuel McBratney; as the fact was not ascertained until late in the night. McBratney was with the party engaged in burning houses on Bear Creek, and fled with the rest, but he and Mr. Lindsey, who was wounded, were on worse horses than the others, and in the rear of the company, I did not see or hear the fire. It was not believed in the camp of Col. Williams, nor in Warsaw, that McBratney was missing, until in the night. The fact having been ascertained, about eleven o'clock at night, a patyy of men went out from Col. Williams' camp, to search for him. They found him in the prairie, dead, lying on his back, his arms and legs spread out. When he was brought to town, I went to the body, and never saw a person more mangled, He had been shot in the shoulder, the ball passing out at the side, and through the arm to the skin; another ball entered the hip. There were three or four deep sabre vuts over the head, and then seven or eight deep stabs in the neck and chest. I am at a loss for a motive for thus mangling the body -- for the shots he had received were sufficient to have secured his arrest, and must have disabled him from making any resistance after he fell from his horse. The body was interred the next morning without any parade; but his death added much to the excitement.

I have said that a proposition from the Twelve Elders of the Mormon Church at Nauvoo was received in Warsaw yesterday afternoon. I insert a copy of it, that the reader may the better understand the objections which the citizens entertained in acting upon it.

To Levi Williams, and the mob party of whom he is the supposed leader, who have been and are still engaged in burning the houses and property of the peaceable citizens of Hancock County.

We, the undersigned, a committee of the citizens of the city of Nauvoo, have selected a committee of five, viz: P. Haws, Andw. H. Perkins, Andw. H. Derby, David D. Yarsley, and Solomon Hancocke, who will be the bearers of this, to confer with you, and inform you that it is our intention to leave Nauvoo and the county next spring, provided, that yourselves and all others will cease all hostile operations, so as to give us the short but necessary time for our journey; and we want you to return us an answer in writing by our said committee, whether you will cease your destructive operations, and vexatious law suits, and give us the opportunity of carrying out our designs peacefully.

Brigham Young,
John E. Page,
Geo. D. Smith,
T. P. Pratte,
Orson Spenser,
Samuel Best,
  Nauvoo, Sept. 16, 1845.
Amasa Lyman,
Willard Richards,
Charles C. Rich,
Isaac Morley,
John Taylor,
Heber C. Kimball.

This communication, instead of being conveyed by the committee, as it purports to be, was brought to Warsaw by an individual, not a member of the committee; and although it is dated on the 16th, it was not delivered until the evening of the 17th. The citizens and the men in Williams' camp. appeared to be well pleased with the terms of the [compromise?] proposal, but were unwilling to act under it. The caption of the communication is "to the mob party and those engaged in burning the houses and property of peaceable citizens." Now, many of the most influencial men in the anti-Mormon party, who strongly desire the removal of the Mormons from the county, have throughout opposed the burning of houses, and were, therefore, unwilling to make the admission that they were the persons to whom the communication was addressed. To act under it, they conceived, involved this admission. Believing that there was a possibility of effecting a compromise, and staying the further destruction of life and property, I consented to go to Nauvoo, and endeavored to induce the Twelve so to change or alter the address of their communication, that the citizens might feel free to act under it.

I left Warsaw about eleven A. M., and reached Nauvoo about three that evening. Nothing of comment occurred on the way up. About eight miles out, I was hailed, and stopped by the picket guard of the city, and I was also stopped as I was about entering the city by another guard; but in each instance they were very civil, and, after being informed that I was going to Nauvoo on business with the Twelve, they offered no further resistance. I saw but few persons in the streets of Nauvoo. Mr. Backenstos, the Sheriff, had left an hour before my arrival, with a body of troops for the vicinity of Warsaw. The work upon the Temple and Hotel is suspended for the present, and everything was quiet and peaceable, except the occasional appearance of armed men; generally with a gun and knife.

I met the Council of Twelve at Mr. Taylor's, and laid before them the purpose of my visit. I endeavored to explain to them the position in which the phraseology of of the proposition placed those anti-Mormons who had not been engaged in the burning or destruction of property, and assured them, if they would so change of modify the address -- if they would direct it to individuals, or to the anti-Mormons, or to those opposing the Mormons, or in any way which would not involve a direct charge of crime, that their proposal would be acted upon, and a committee appointed immediately to confer with them. I urged that if their proposition was made in good faith; they could not object to the modification, as that did not affect the terms of compromise. After a long and desultory discussion, they declined making any change or modification, and I left the meeting. My inference from what was said in the meeting was, that the events of the preceding day, the flight of the Anties, and the confidence expressed by Mr. Backenstos in his third proclamation, that he could succeed in arresting the burners, had produced a decided change in their feelings from what they were when the proposition was written. Considerable anxiety was manifested to withdraw the proposition altogether, and repeated declarations were made of their ability and determination to maintain their position, and to punish those who have destroyed their property. They frequently declared that, if the law failed to furnish them protection and redress, they had the power, and would exercise it, to protect themselves, and retaliate on those who had injured them. They certainly can bring into the field a large body of well armed men, but I fear they lack the essential of a good soldier, viz: courage. I was acompanied on the trip by a warm anti-Mormon -- a discreet young man -- Mr. Brown; and to show the manner in which things are viewed by persons here, I may here state a conversation which occurred with Mr. B. A Mormon, who had been burned out, gave him a description of the manner of proceeding, "Two clerks," said he, "came out from Warsaw and invited me to empty my house, then set fire to it, doing up the whole thing just as politely as if they had been selling me a bill of $50 worth of goods."

This is a pretty fair description of the way things were done, and the truth is, that there were not many personally engaged in the destruction of property. Those who are, reason that thus: They say that the Mormons and old citizens cannot live together, and that the burning down of their residences is the most emphatic, as well as the easiest way to show them that they must leave. The season and the crops, they say, are favorable for them to go, and they may as well be convinced now as at any other time, of the necessity of their going. This is the reasoning of the Fire and Sword policy.

I remained in Nauvoo all night, during which time Mr. Backenstos sent in a requisition for six hundred more men. About sun rise on Friday morning the alarm gun -- a large cannon stationed on the hill near the Temple -- was fired, and before we left the city the people were flocking in. I was informed by a prominent Mormon, Mr. Babbit, that they would send out to Backenstos that day about three hundred artillery men and an equal number of foot or infantry. I am disposed to believe the numbers were greatly exaggerated, for Backenstos' party, which left the evening I arrived in Nauvoo, was represented as six hundred strong, when in fact he had not two hundred with him. There is much sickness in the country. Each party is about equally afflicted with it, and from this cause neither party can muster its full force. I was frequently told, that the object of this great force was to visit Warsaw and arrest the citizens who were engaged in the depredations.

I returned to Warsaw, having effected nothing as far as a compromise was concerned. Upon the spread of the intelligence of the number of men under the command of Backenstos, mist of the citizens who thought they were implicated, and their families, crossed the Mississippi, to the towns of Alexendria and Churchville, where, I believe, they will await assistance from the anti-Mormons of other parts of the county, and from Missouri. I am well satisfied that the Anties have no disposition to give up the contest; in fact, many of them have gone too far now to retreat. I learned that they have invited Col. Allen, of Monticello, to take the command, and they were expecting assistance from the vicinity of Carthage, and from several of the adjoining counties. At the same time, the Mormons say that assistance has been proffered them from several counties and from parts of Iowa. My own opinion is that both sides will receive less assistance than they expect.

On Friday, Bacxkenstos had two encampments in the cicinity of Warsaw. One, which I understood to be under the command of Mr. Moteum, was in the vicinity of the place of action of Wednesday, near the Green Plains. The other, under Mr. Millet, was encamped on a branch of Charm Creek, about eight miles above Warsaw. His whole firce, from the best information I could gather, was from two hundred and fifty to four hundred, though it was represented to me at Nauvoo as being much stronger. During Friday, Backenstos sent a written communication to Col. Williams, in which he requires the Colonel, and the leaders of the mob, to come in and submit to the laws, and to be dealt with accordingly; to give up the arms in their possession, belonging to the State, and a piece of cannon, which he said they had obtained by fraud. He gave them until twelve o'clock of Saturday to reply, and if they failed, he promised to put every man engaged in the outrage "to the sword." I am at a loss to understand what the sheriff means by this threat of putting men "to the sword," which he frequently uses in his proclamations. He must catch a man before he can put him to the sword, and I, therefore, take it that he means to retailiate on them, probably by burning their property, or something of that kind.

No reply, I understood would be made by Col. Williams to this communication, nor could it be said, when I left Warsaw, about one o'clock in the night of Friday, what course they would pursue.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


The Pittsburgh Commercial Journal.
Vol. ?                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  September ?, 1845.                             No. ?



MORMON  OUTRAGE.

The correspondent of the St. Louis Republican, writing from Warsaw, gives the following account of serious outbreaks between the Mormons and their opponents in Hancock county:

Warsaw Sept. 11, 1845.      
10 o' clock A. M.          
Messrs. Editors: -- On Tuesday morning last, 9th inst., an attack was made on a school house in Rocky Run Precinct, by some persons unknown, but supposed to be Mormons, in which there was at the time of the attack a convention of anti-Mormons, or old settlers of this County. The doors and windows of the house were completely riddled by the shots fired by the assailants. The attacking party approached under cover of the woods and bushes and fired one round and fled.

No person was injured, but many were, I presume, much frightened at the sudden and unexpected assault. The old settlers in that section of the county armed themselves for defence, and if they are backed by their friends in other parts of the country, blood will flow. By a messenger just in, who came to purchase lead, powder, flints, &c., I learn that four buildings were burned down last night, and one man shot, and very badly wounded, but not mortally. Yesterday thirteen wagons loaded with furniture, were seen wending their way to the city of Refuge, (Nauvoo.)


Note: Exact date of clipping not yet established; but probably from the end of September, 1845.


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  October 1, 1845.                             No. 43.



THE  MORMONS.

There has been great excitement in Adams and Hancock counties, Ill., for some days; every mail brings us news of continued destruction of property -- the following we get from the daily papers.

Civil War in Illinois.

On the vicinity of Nauvoo, there has been another outbreak, about the 10th or 11th inst. A body of old settlers or Anti-Mormons, held a convention in a house a short distance from Warsaw. They were attacked by a body of men, who advanced upon them under cover of the woods, with fire arms. The discharge riddled the door and windows of the house in which the convention sat, and wounding one man severely. The old settlers and their friends armed themselves. Mormon families fled to the city of Refuge, Nauvoo, and families of the old settlers sought protection in Warsaw. At night four buildings were burnt to the ground. Large bodies of Mormons &tc., were patroling the southern part of the county.

The following additional information is copied from the St. Louis Republican of the 16th inst.:

More Mormon Troubles -- Houses burned --
A Conflict apprehended.


Office of the Daily Morning Courier,
Quincy, Adams Co., Ill., Sept. 14, '45.

Gentlemen: We write in haste to inform you of a serious disturbance that has taken place in the upper part of this county, between a portion of the "old citizens" of this and Hancock county, and the Mormons. A gentleman, belonging to thos city returned from Lima, in the vicinity of the outbreak, last evening, and informs us that on Thursday last the anti-Mormons attacked a settlement known by the name of "Morley's Settlement," a short distance north-east of Lima, in this county, and that up to the time he left, twenty-five or thirty houses had been burnt, together with several barns and wheat stacks. The excitement was very great, and large bodies of anti-Mormons were pouring in from the adjoining counties and from Missouri, and they were still burning and destroying property, and were determined to drive the Mormons out of the county. Our informant saw about fifty Mormons, under arms, within two miles of the settlement, who appeared determined to defend themselves. It was in contemplation by the anti-Mormons to attack two more settlements last evening.
In haste, yours, &c.      

                          From the St. Louis New Era.
More Bloodshed.

If we are to believe the current accounts from the seat of the Mormon war things appear to be drawing to a close. The steamer Die Vernon arrived yesterday, bringing down a number of passengers, many of whom are said to be anti-Mormons fleeing from the wrath to come. The most authentic statement now is, that the Mormons, headed by the redoubtable Backenstos, High Sheriff of Hancock county, and Keeper of the peace in general, have got the upper jand, and are about to have the sport of slaying the anties to themselves.

It is said that he has issued another proclamation, No. 3, which has struck such consternation into the anti-Mormon army of Gen. Williams, and so completely horrified the inhabitants of Warsaw, that the largest proportion of the army deserted, and that the citizens fled in all directions. -- The following pieces of war news we found attached to the manifest of the Die Vernon: it sounds a good deal like a great deal we have heard before; what reliance is to be placed in it those that read it can best determine.

"Two companies of Mormons, one under Mr. Williams and the other under Mr. Miller, were encamped on Friday about eight miles from Warsaw, and avowed their determination to visit Warsaw next day. The whole Mormon force was about five hundred, and Backenstos, the Sheriff, has made a requisition on Nauvoo for six hundred more, who were to be down on Saturday.

On Froday the Sheriff sent a communication to Col. Williams requiring him and the other leaders of the mob to surrender themselves to be dealt with accorsing to law, and give up the State arms, in which event he (the Sheriff) would not proceed further, but upon their refusal, he would put every one to the sword; they were allowed till twelve o'clock on Saturday to answer. Most of the citizens of Warsaw and Col. Williams' men had crossed to the other side of the river to wait for assistance. The house burning and other depredations upon the Mormons had ceased.

There will be bloody work, in marching 500 men into Warsaw, and upon their refusing to surrender he would put every one to the sword; but if the army of the anti-Mormons have nearly all deserted, and all the inhabitants of Warsaw fled, who will that second Nero find to wreak his [wrath?] upon? Certainly, he will not turn about and slay innocent persons; nor is it probable that he will cross over into Missouri after the antis.

We never had much confidence in these Bombastes Furioso accounts of Mormon wars, but there are a great many persons who are so fond of war, and by their partiality for the horrible are left astray. We suppose that when Sheriff Backenstos marches into Warsaw and finds none of the rioters there, that he will march out again without producing a civil war.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. ?                                 Pittsburgh,  October 1, 1845.                                 No. ?



THE  MORMON  DIFFICULTIES.
EVACUATION OF WARSAW.

By the arrival of the steamer Boreas, at St. Louis, on the 22d ult., the people of that city have the latest intelligence of the Mormon war. By the New Era we learn that on the 20th ult., the Mormons, numbering between 500 and 800, under the command of sheriff Backenstos and E. A. Bedell, Postmaster at Warsaw, marched into that place in triumph. All the citizens who had taken an active part, or in any way sanctioned the late outrages, had previously left for the opposite side of the river, so there was but an empty victory. Backenstos, after marching his troops through the principal streets, and making some pretence to search for offenders, finally drew them up in a solid phlanx on the bank of the river, and in full view of the fugitives from his vengeance on the opposite side, he made them go through the various modes of exercise, no doubt to impress the refugees with a proper respect for his importance in future; when tired of displaying his military preparations, and after satisfying himself that none of the house burners and mobocrats were in the city, he placed a strong force on guard and withdrew with the main portion of his army to an encampment about two miles distant. The Mormon soldiers had full and quiet possession of the town when the Boreas left.

Everything is said to be quiet in Hancock county at this time, the Mormons having possession of the three principal towns, Carthage, Augusta and Warsaw; but the prevalent opinion is, that it is but a delusive calm before the outbreak of a terrible storm.

In a few days we shall hear Backenstos and the Mormons have gone home or that a general outbreak has taken place.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Thursday  Morning,  October 3, 1845.                         No. 52.



Correspondence of the St. Louis Republican.

WARSAW, September 23, 1845.     
Tuesday, 10 o'clock, A. M.     

Sheriff Backenstos has issued another proclamation, which I enclose, containing the usual amount of falsehoods, which marked his proclamations Nos. 1, 2 and 3. I have learned that Governor Chambers, of Iowa, has ordered one brigade to be in readiness to defend the citizens of Iowa from Mormon aggression. On Monday, McDonough county sent down four delegates, to ascertain the true situation of affairs in this county, and request also the anti-Mormons to send two delegates to McDonough, to meet two delegates from Nauvoo, for the purpose of forming a treaty of peace between the belligerents of Hancock county. The delegates from McDonough say, that the Mormons must and shall leave. I sincerely hope that some arrangements will be entered into, to accomplish their quiet and peaceful removal, and that peace may again be restored. Should this not be the result of the deliberations of the delegates, the anti-Mormons are prepared to take the field with a respectable force, and will not rest until one or the other of the parties are expelled from the county.

The Mormons have commenced their thieving operations on a larger scale. About one hundred and fifty head of cattle have been stolen from the old settlers, by the roving band of Mormons that are now prowling over the county. B. F. Marsh, who resides about five miles east of Warsaw, lost, on Sunday night, thirty-one head of fine Durham cattle. All kinds of loose property have been taken. I have been informed that Joshua Cole, of Mechanicsville, left home one day last week, armed with a rifle, pistols and bowie knife, to repair to Warsaw, for the purpose of joining the anti-Mormon forces, and has not been heard from since. It is believed that he has been killed by the party under Backenstos.

The citizens who left Warsaw to seek protection in Missouri, have returned to their homes and I hope that this will be the last time that they will have occasion to evacuate their town.

As soon as I hear from McDonough, I will advise you what has been done by the delegates, and of the determination of the citizens generally.

Seven o'clock P. M. -- I have opened this for the purpose of informing you, that Maj. General McCallen, of the 5th Division Illinois Militia, has ordered out the 3d brigate, under Brig. Gen. W. H. Stapp, and directed Gen. Sapp to proceed forthwith to Hancock county, to protect the lives and property of the citizens, now exposed to a lawless band of Mormons, who are patrolling the county under the command of J. B. Backenstos, Sheriff, and who, under color of law, is endeavoring to oppress and destroy all such persons as he considers opposed to him and to Mormon tyranny and aggression. Gen. McCallen has advised Col. Williams of the calling out of the 3d brigade, and requests Col. Williams to inform him how efforts stand in the county. Col. Williams has issued his orders this evening, calling out the 4th brigade, he being senious Colonel, and directed the brigade to rendezvous at Warsaw and Carthage, and has advised Maj. Gen. McCallen of this step, and requesting him to sanction this order, which will be done without doubt. Expresses are hourly arriving, which state that the Mormon posse are making a clean sweep in this county. Gaurds are stationed at all the crossroads, and no person is allowed to pass without a strict search of their persons, and are told that if they made it known their lives will be the forfeit. The whole county is in a blaze, and nothing but the expulsion of the Mormons will allay the excitement. News of the most cheering kind is pouring in, and if the Anties stand fast, all will be well.

A young gentleman has just arrived from Keokuk and requests, that the citizens of Keokuck were raising a company of men to drive the Mormons from Sugar Creek settlement in Lee county, Iowa. Also, that the citizens of Fort Madison were determined to prevent the return of the Mormons who had left Augusta, Iowa Territory, for the purpose of aiding their brethren in Hancock county.



Anti-Mormon Meeting at Quincy, Ill.

Meeting at Quincy. -- The largest meeting ever held in Quincy, took place on Monday, the 21st inst., to consider the state of affairs in Hancock county. Archibald Williams was in the chair, and William H. Bennison, Secretary. -- On motion, a committee was appointed by the chair to propose resolutions for the action of the meeting.

The preamble sets forth the difficulties which have grown up between the Mormons and citizens of Hancock county, at length, and the absolute necessity for the removal of the former, and the probability of a collusion between them, and the inhabitants of the adjoining counties. The following resolutions were adopted.

Resolved, That in the opinion of this meeting (and it is their firm conviction) the safety of Nauvoo, as well as the welfare of the other citizens of this State, will be best subserved by their removal to some country in which their peculiar organization will not endanger the public peace, and that if this measure be not pursued, they ought [at] least, to break up their present organization as a distinct community, and amalgamate with the people of the State.

Resolved, That in the event of such a conflixt, as is alluded to and depricated in the foregoing preamble, the Mormons, warned by past experience. may expect that the sympathy and strength of an overwhelming majority of the people will be arrayed against them.

Diverse speeches were made all full of sympathy for the Anti-Mormons. It was proposed to send a committee of one thousand men forthwith to bring the Mormons to to terms. A committee of five were sent to Hancock to ascertain the disposition of the Mormons in relation to the above resolutions.

The "Courier" thinks the troubles are just commencing, and that if the Mormons refuse to leave the State, force will be used to make them go. And the "Whig" says public sentiment is decidedly against the Mormons -- they must go -- and Backenstos fell the full force of the law for killing Worrell.

A meeting was called for the 23d, at night to hear the report of a committee from Hancock.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Tuesday  Morning,  October 7, 1845.                         No. 55.



CIVIL  WAR  IN  ILLINOIS.
Correspondence of the St. Louis Republican.

WARSAW, Sept. 25, 1845..     

Below I send you a memorandum of each depredation as have been committed by the Mormons within eight or ten miles of Warsaw, that have come to my knowledge:

Frances Kerns, who removed from his house with his family, has had all his loose property consisting of beds, bedding, cooking and farming utensils, 15 bee stands, 18 head of cattle, about 100 bushels thrashed wheat, and two stacks of oats stolen. His corn field was entered by twelve or fifteen waggons from Nauvoo, gathered and taken to that city. On the 21st instant, at night, B. F. Marsh, Rodolphus Chandler, and Robert Ayres, had sixty-eight head of cattle stolen; they were followed by Mr. Denny, who saw them driving on the Nauvoo road. He thinks there were from 100 to 150 in the drove. About forty head belonging to inhabitants of Warsaw, that range in the neighborhood, cannot be found. While Randolphus Chandler was in Warsaw, on the 22d inst, in day time, fourteen persons, one of which was recognized as a Mormon, named Winters, entered his house and stole everything moveable therefrom and drove away about 25 head of sheep. He has now nothing left but his house and land, with a sick family to provide for.

Thomas J. Raylor has had 15 head of cattle driven away; Matthew Gray, near Montibello, eight head of cattle and two of horses, stolen from his stable last night. John Wills, who is sick, and has been confined to his bed three weeks, has had all his cattle driven away and his bee gum stolen.

Edward Daw, William Fleming, Thomas Crawford, Cyrus Felt, have had cattle taken from them, but I cannot ascertain the definite number. All the cattle that were in the habit of ranging in the prairie between Warsaw and Carthage, Colonel Samuel Chandler informs me, that from his house, he has been in the habit of seeing more than 500 head of cattle, now hardly one is to be seen.

The above persons are now in the county -- more than half of the old citizensd have forsaken their [houses], leaving their property behind, and their loss cannot be correctly ascertained until they return. About Carthage, the county seat. the depredations are as numerous as about Warsaw. The posse, who are on horse, and are encamped in the court house, steal possessions for themselves and horses.They took some of Hamilton's, the tavern keeper's cattle, from his boys as they were driving them up. Hamilton went to Backenstos, the Mormon Sheriff, who has command of the posse, to have them returned. Instead of this, Backenstos told him to shoot the damned rascals. He would not have the cattle returned, although repeatedly asked. Today, I understood about 200 Mormons, a part of the posse have gone to St. Mary's twelve miles east of Carthage. It seems that portion of the courts must be made to suffer the calamities that have befallen us in the western part.

It is my opinion, that in ten days from this time, unless an army is marched forthwith into Hancock, the farmers in the county will be utterly ruined by the loss of their property -- every hour brings reports of some new depredations.
                                    In haste yours.



                                                   WARSAW, Sept. 29.
Correct information has now been received that Gen. Hardin is on his way to Hancock county, empowered by the Governor to settle, in some way, the difficulties between the Mormons and Anti-Mormons. We have the fullest confidence that we shall get rid of our troublesome neighbors, in a short time, and that peace will be once more restored to our county. The surrounding counties are now holding meetings and appointing delegates to meet on Wednesday next, at Carthage, for the purpose of setting the terms and the time when the Mormons shall leave, and remove to some country more suited to their peculiar notions, than our own. After having arranged the terms and time of removal, the adjoining counties will furnish, if necessary, a force sufficient to carry out their deliberations, but in the meantime, the citizens of Hancock will have their property carried off by Backenstos's travelling posse. Carthage is yet under the control of this petty tyrant, and his Mormon abetters.

Joshua Cole, who, it was supposed, had been murdered has been found safe, and is at home. A report is in circulation, coming from the Mormons, that M'Bratney, the young Irishman who was so cruelly butchered, begged and prayed for life on his knees, after the Mormons came up to him, but that the only mercy he found from them was a bloody death.

Six o'clock, P. M. -- Gen. Hanks will be in Carthage tonight, with a small portion of the troops under his command, Backenstos has left Carthage with his posse for Nauvoo. I understand he is somewhat crest fallen, and by taking his timely departure, undoubtedly has adopted the old adage, which says: "He who lives and runs away,
May live to fight another day."
The two independent companies of Quincy are expected up this evening on the Die Vernon; they have been ordered to rendezvous ar Warsaw, by Gen. Hardin.
                                                          H.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Saturday  Morning,  October 11, 1845.                         No. 59.



From the St. Louis Republican.

We have a letter from Churchville, opposite Warsaw, dated the 30th, giving the proceedings of a meeting held by the citizens of Clark county, which we have not room for this morning. We give the following extract:

"We have intelligence from Carthage up to two o'clock today (30th.) Gen. Hardin with 300 men left Carthage before daylight this morning fr Nauvoo. He has invited all who have lost property to accompany him. I understand many have have gone, but do not believe much will be recovered.

Finch's store, at La Harpe, was robbed last Saturday night. His clerk, named Samuel, a son-in-law of Colson, the Mormon County Commissioner, during Finch's absence, packed the goods, ammounting to $1500 -- charged them to himself and took them to Nauvoo. Fearing the consequences, Colson went to Nauvoo, found them and had them taken back to La Harpe. I have this information from Mr. Key, who has just returned from Warren county.

Mr. Key attended the meetings at Monmouth, [Quawka], and McQueen's mills, He says the meetings were very large and expressed their determination to make the Mormons leave forthwith. They have the confidence in [Monmouth] precinct. Many of our citizens ventured into Warsaw while Captain Morgan's company was there, but when they left, crossed again to Missouri.     Yours respectfully."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  October 15, 1845.                         No. 62.



END OF THE MORMON WAR.

By documents published in the St. Louis Republican, we learn that the Mormons have entered into a definite arrangement to leave Illinois in the spring, in a body, for some place west of the Rocky Mountains. This arrangement has been amicably agreed upon -- in fact, the Mormons say they had intended going at any rate, had the distirbances not taken place. A small military force will be kept in the county to preserve order until the removal takes place.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. ?                                 Pittsburgh,  October 15, 1845.                                 No. ?


 

MORMON NEWS. -- We copy the following from the St. Louis Republican of Monday the 6th: -- "Our correspondence from Warsaw states rge result of the deliberations if the Anti-Mormon convention at Carthage last week. Nine of the adjoining counties were represented, and it will be seen that they resolved that the Saints must leave by spring. As the official proceedings have not yet reached us, we are unacquainted with the mode proposed to effect this object, but hope it may be such as to leave no doubt on the subject. We learn by the Die Vernon that Gen. Hardin had arrested Backenstos, and it was said, intended to send him to Springfield -- with what object we are not informed. Nauvoo was quiet, and Gen. Hardin had left the place with the forces under his command,"



End of the Mormon War. -- By documents published in the St. Louis Republican, we learn that the Mormons have entered into a definite arrangement to leave Illinois in the spring, in a body, for some place west of the Rocky Mountains. This arrangement has been amicably agreed upon -- in fact, the Mormons say they had intended going at any rate, had the disturbance not taken place. A small military force will be kept in the county to preserve order until the removal takes place.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  October 22, 1845.                             No. 46.


 

KNEELAND AND JOE SMITH. -- The year 1844 will be memorable to those in this vicinity, for the death of two distinguished leaders in the ranks of opposition -- the Mormon Prophet by the hand of violence. He who had surveyed the country far and near, and stuck his twelve stakes where he was to build twelve temples answering to the twelve tribes of the children of Israel; has gone to meet his God, ere one temple is half completed. His followers are divided and scattered, and his schemes are ere long to come to nought. The Prophet of Atheism, too, who some years since in a public assembly, in the metropolis of New England, dared the Almighty to strike him dead, and gave him five minutes in which to do it, and held his watch in his hand with his arm extended until the minutes had expired, and then said "Where is now your God?" -- and who for the last six years, had been propagating his Atheism in Iowa, with a zeal and self consecration worthy of a better cause -- he too, has passed unconsciously, to the judgment seat.... So have perished the champions of Mormonism and Atheism, and so will perish the champions of infidelity and the unrepenting legions of the Man of Sin. -- Report A. H. Soc.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Daily Commercial Journal and
Spirit of the Age.

Vol. III.                     Saturday,  October 25, 1845.                         No. 160.



Mormon  Affairs.

The military force stationed in Hancock county is under the command of Col. Wm. B. Warren, of Jacksonville, Illinois. The Quincy Rifle Company, numbering fifty men, comprise a part of this force. Col. Warren seems to have been successful in capturing two Mormon thieves and finding the peoperty in their possession in Nauvoo. The Quincy Whig furnishes the following facts, and subjoins affidavits to all the material points, made by Thos. J. Taylor:

The house of Harrison Crawford, of Hancock, was robbed on Friday night, the 3d insr., of every thing it contained. Information of the robbery coming to the ears of Gen. Hardib, he despatched a posse of twenty men, under command of Col. W. B. Warren, an officer of the go ahead character, to recover the property, and if possible secure the thieves. Col. Warren, and his posse, arrived in Nauvoo, about noon on Tuesday, the 7th, and immediately searched the house of a Mormon brother, Daniel Smith, and found there various items of property identified by Mr. Crawford as his own, and then searched the house of one Walton, another Saint, where more of Crawford's property was discovered -- from thence they went to the house of brother Benjamin Gardner, where they found bed, bedding, harness, gun, some honey, jugs of vinegar, &c., all identified as the property of said Harrison Crawford. While they were searching the last house, two of the robbers spranf through a window and made tracks for the centre of the city. Colonel Warren's posse pursued, and after running the robbers down, secured them. By this time, as the reader may well be aware, the holy city of Nauvoo was in pretty much of an uproar. The saints, believing the city was invaded by the anti-Mormons; were running to and fro in every direction -- some with guns and some without. Some approached Warren with menacing language, and wanted to know what business he had there? He told them he was there on his own business. They then asked, by whose order he came there; he answered, by order of Gen. Hardin. When this was announced, they turned and left him to dispose of his prisoners as he thought best. They (the prisoners) were taken to Carthage and placed in jail -- their names are Smith and Gardner. At the same time the posse found five head of cattle, which had been stolen on the same night from Thomas Crawford.


Nootka or Vancouver Island, on the north-west coast of North America, we have it from good authority, is to be the final destination and home of the Mormon people. This island is about 300 miles long, and from 75 to 100 in width. It is separated from the main land by a long, narrow strait, and lies between the 47th or 48th and 51st or 52nd degrees of north latitude, extending along the coast in a north-west direction. The boundary line between the American and the British possessions in the north-west will probably pass across the island. The English, we believe, have one or two trading posts on the island, but for the most part it is inhabited by Indians, of not a warlike disposition. It is a long journey, but can be accomplished. If the Mormons do emigrate to that distant land, they will be out of the reach of harm from white men, and may enjoy their peculiar notions in quiet, until the devil breeds his own discords and confusions among them.

We understand from the same authority that companies are rapidly organizing at Nauvoo, for an early start in the spring. The church authorities and leading men will go out in a very large company, and without doubt the remainder will follow


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  November 5, 1845.                             No. 48.



END  OF  THE  MORMON  WAR.

The St. Louis Republican of the 8th inst. has this correspondence between the Anti-Mormon Committee and the President and Council of the Mormon Church which discloses the terms on which the parties have agreed to suspend hostilities. The following official letter from the Mormons will enable our readers to get a clear understanding of the matter.

                                                        Nauvoo, Oct. 1, 1845.
To Gen. John J. Hardin, W. P. Warren, S. A. Douglass and J. A. McDeagal.

Messrs. In reply to your letter of this date requesting us "to submit the facts and intentions stated by us in writing, in order that you may lay them before the governor and the people of the State" we refer you to our communication of the 24th ult. to the "Quincy committee," &c., a copy of which is herewith enclosed.

In addition to this, we would say that we had commenced making arrangements to remove from thos count, previous to the recent disturbances; that we have four companies organized, one hundred families each, and six more companies now organizing, of the same number each preparatory to a removal.

That one thousand families, including the Twelve, the High Council, the Trustees, and general authorities of the church, are fully determined to remove in the spring, independent of the contingency of selling our property; and that this company will comprise from five to six thousand souls.

That the church, as a body, desire to remove with us, and will, if sales can be effected, so as to raise the necessary means.

That the organization of the church that we represent is such, that there never can exist but one head or presidency at any one time, and all good members wish to be with the organization; and all are determined to remove to some distant point where we shall neither infringe or be infringed upon, so soon as time and means will permit.

That we have some hundreds of farms and some two thousand or more houses in this city and county, and we request all good citizens to assist in the disposal of our property.

That we do not expect to find purchasers for our Temple and other public buildings; but we are willing to rent them to a respectable community who may inhabit the city....

That we do not intend to sow any wheat this fall, and should we all sell we shall not put in any more crops of any description.

That as soon as practicable, we will appoint committees for this city, La Harpe, Macedonia, Bear Creek, and all necessary places in the county to [give information to] purchasers.

That if these testimonies are not sufficient to satisfy any people that we are in earnest, we will soon give them a sign that cannot be mistaken, we will leave them!

                    BRIGHAM YOUNG, Pres't.
Willard Richards, Clerk.

The Anti-Mormon Committee in their reply to the foregoing, declare themlseves satisfied with its terms, and there appears to be a general acquiesence in the arrangement on the part of the citizens so far at least as to secure a suspension of hostilities until spring, when the whole difficulty may be ended by the removal of the Mormons according to agreement. They say:

"At the solicitation of men of all parties, and from a conviction of the necessity of the measure Gen. Hardin has determined to station a portion of his troops in this county, to maintain order, who will remain in the field until the Governor shall order them to be disbanded. We have also recommended to the Governor to appoint an Attorney to act for the state, who shall decide what process the military force shall execute; and thus prevent them from being harrassed by being called out to act in frivolous and improper cases, and at the same time, to check and restrain the troops from any improper action."

Thus ends we hope -- for the present at least, this most unfortunate and disgraceful war. We hope that a contest so deeply fraught with intolerance and persecution on one side, and ignorance and fanaticism on the other, may never be renewed.



At the Anti-Mormon Convention which recently assembled at Carthage, Illinois, a complete military organization was recommended, to protect the citizens from the depredations of the Mormons. A dangerous experiment, as the excitement against the Mormons was at our last accounts fearfully high. Should a military organization be accomplished by their opponents, and should some terrible story of Mormon outrage be circulated, it would be difficult to prevent a war of extermination.



THE FUTURE HOME OF THE MORMONS. -- Nooka [sic - Nootka?], or Vancouver island, on the Northwest coast of North America, is to be the final destination and home of the Mormon people. This island is about 300 miles long, and from 75 to 100 in width. It is separated from the main land by a long, narrow strait, and lies between the 47th or 48th and 51st or 52nd degrees of north latitude, extending along the coast in a northwest direction. The boundary line between the American and the British possessions in the northwest, will probably pass across the island. The English, we believe, have two or three trading posts on the island, but for the most part, it is inhabited by Indians of not a warlike disposition. It is a long journey, but can be accomplished.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Lancaster Examiner and Herald.

nsVol. VII.                         Lancaster, Pa., Wednesday,  November 5, 1845.                         No. 49.



==> The Mormons, it seems, are not united with reference to their removal beyond the Rocky Mountains. The St. Louis New Era says that there has been a feud and division among them. It is stated that after the murder of Joe Smith, there was a struggle for the ascendancy; Sidney Rigdon thought that he ought to be the next in command, but he was defeated and denounced. Emma Smith, the widow, seemed disposed to be the spiritual ruler, but her claims were not recognized; William Smith, the brother of Joe, set himself up as Patriarch, but the other Mormon leaders would not give him control of their affairs. Brigham Young and the Council of Twelve, then took upon themselves the spiritual and temporal government of the Mormons. They propose to remove the Saints beyond the Rocky Mountains, and there set up for themselves. To this William Smith, the pretended Patriarch, is violently opposed, and he resists it with all his power. He favors the plan of a dispersion of the Mormons and their settlement throughout the country, but is in favor of an adherence to their religious absurdities and superstitious observances. He thinks that if their religious and political embodiment in separate communities, were abandoned, that the violent opposition to them would cease, and that they would enjoy more peace. He denounces Young and his adherents, and the feud between them seems to be very violent. The mass of the Mormons appear to be disposed to adhere to Young and his party, as affording the best chance to carry out the objects and purposes of their fanatical association.



CHARGED WITH MURDER. -- J. B. Backenstos, the Mormon [sic - Mormons' ?] Sheriff, has been held to bail in the sum of $3000, to answer for the killing of Worrell, during the late Mormon outbreak.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  November 19, 1845.                             No. 50.



Summary.

Mormon Troubles. -- Notwithstanding the sacred promises made in their recent treaty with the State authorities of Illinois, the Mormons still continue their depredations upon the inhabitants of the adjacent country. The house of Mr. Crawford near Warsaw, was recently entered, during the family's absence and every thing of a portable nature stolen from it. Col. Warren, in an account of the affair, says:

"About the same time, two splendid horses, the property of L. Chandler, and several heads of cattle, were stolen from the neighborhood. Other robberies of a similar character were also committed. A man who was driving a herd of cattle towards Nauvoo, a noted Mormon, was encountered by General Hardin, who finding that he was unable to account for them in as satisfactory a manner as he could have desired, sent him as a prisoner to Quincy. Wilcox, whose disappearance while on a visit to a friend in Nauvoo, creates so much excitement, has not yet been heard from. A German named Dabenheyer had also dosappeared, and his body was found in a ditch near the house of a Mormon."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  November 26, 1845.                             No. 51.



THE  MORMONS.

We give below a portion of a letter which has appeared in the Journal of Commerce, giving an account of the occasions of hostility against the Mormons, as understood by their enemies. We give likewise the editorial remarks of that paper: --

The writer of the annexed letter undertakes to explain the causes of the exasperation that exists against the Mormons, among the surrounding population. We have omitted several of the specifications, as being either too personal or too gross, -- but enough remains to show the reader that either the Mormons are a very bad people, or that their character is entirely misunderstood by the inhabitants of the surrounding country. Of course we do not vouch for the correctness of all our correspondent's statement, but we vouch for him, as a man who designs and desires to speak the truth, and nothing but the truth -- Journal of Commerce.

Hancock Co., Ill., Oct. 28, 1845.      
In your paper of the 8th of October, you say that "none of the Western papers furnish the causes of the exasperation that exists against the Mormons." I will give you the view of the case, as it is understood by all men of my acquaintance, who are conversant with Mormon history. And you will perceive from our relation to them, as citizens of the same county, that we should come to the following conclusion with more reluctance than any other persons; but they have forced conviction upon our minds by arguments which we cannot resist. The conclusion is this:

That Mormonism is a scheme for acquiring money and power by unlawful means; that Nauvoo is a fortress, and that Hancock county has been occupied to give the administration of the law into the hands of the chiefs of the gang. -- With this statement every known fact agrees.

1. Their location, in a region of sparse population.

2. Their location upon the borders of three States.

3. The assembling of so many men in a place of no business.

4. It is acknowledged by the authorities of Nauvoo, that great numbers of thieves and robbers have gathered at their city.

5. In the midst of swarms of thieves, the property of Mormons has not been molested -- only the Gentiles have suffered.

6. The fact that the swindlers and thieves who gather there, are the intimate associates of the heads of the Church.

7. In connection with the peculiar dialect of the gentlemen who live without work or ostensible means, the Mormon chiefs exhibit the same peculiar style of manner and bearing, but ill disguised by the saintly mask.

8. Their great solicitude for unusual privileges for their city.

9. The virtual nullification of all law in Nauvoo.

10. The establishment of what they call their "living law, which visits with destruction persons or property of those who become obnoxious to the Twelve. By this law, which has been the supreme law of Nauvoo for years, every one in the secrets of Mormonism is restrained by the fear of the most dreadful death, from making any disclosure. Under this law, Irvine Hodges was assassinated -- for threatening disclosures which would implicate the Apostles, as connected with the gang of robbers who murdered Davenport and the men in Iowa.

11. Their practice of driving from their vicinity persons whose influence they fear, by wasting their property, or threatening their lives.

12. Their jealousy of spies. Travellers have often been interrupted and detained as spies. -- What other city is afraid of spies? On this charge, [Wilson], going into Nauvoo on business was put -- [none] but the Mormons know where!

13. Their"law abiding" character. By law they [burn] a [printing press], by the verdict of a Mormon jury they [acquit] the [rioters] and [under] the [protection] of their Sheriff's [posse?], they have exhibited [-----es] of riot, plunder and murder [-------- ----] [were in the land].

14. Within less than a year, eight or ten murders have been committed in and about Hancock, but not a drop of Mormon blood has been [spilled], except [that of] Hodges, who was [killed] by [desperados?] [under the "living law."]....

17. The [-------ness] [attending?] the [------ ---------rs]. [------ ------] had a [------ -------- ----- -----] [------- ------ his gun ------ ------- and a small ------ in the -----]. [---- ------ly ------ ------] and justified it by [affirming] that W. attempted to shoot him.

16. They have generally selected for office either some of their own members, or the most abandoned men thay could find, auch as without being baptised, were naturally Mormons....

20. It is common for Mormons to deny their name when abroad; it would not facilitate their business to be known....

24. The arrangements at Nauvoo for concealment. Subterranean passages and chambers were not built for honest men.

25. It has long been known, that Nauvoo was the source of much counterfeit coin, but it has not yet beem seized, for fear of the Nauvoo Legion.

26. They have from the first been anticipating war, threatening war, collecting arms and military stores. The whole city bristles with guns, pistols, sabres, bowie-knives, spears, &c. The building of a fort under color of a place of worship, with a massive wall of masonry, enclosing six acres of land. They can show seven times the amount of deadly weapons which can be produced in an equal population any where else in the land.

27. Many men, thought to be honest, have joined them, and soon turned out rogues; and many distinguished villains have joined them, but without any amendment of life by any of them.

28. The Mormons at Nauvoo are much more corrupt than those abroad.

29. They have removed the key of knowledge, and do not allow their people any rule of duty but the revelations of the Twelve.

30. By these revelations they commit adultery, steal, and do every thing after the imagination of their heart.

31. The inferior class, some of whom may be honest, if away from Nauvoo, are held in an absolute and blind obedience, in some things, on pain of damnation.

__________
* Within the year.   Ed. of J. C.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Monday  Morning,  December 1, 1845.                         No. 101.


 

Mormon Affairs. -- The Warsaw Signal, of Wednesday, 19th ult. is devoted to matters relating to the Mormons.

A daring robbery is charged to have been committed, some days previous, at the house of B. C. Bride, nineteen miles east of Warsaw. Three persons entered it, took possession of a large trunk, containing clothing, and twenty dollars in money, and the papers of Mr. Bride. They entered the house about two o'clock at night -- were discovered as they were leaving -- followed towards the Mormon settlement on Bear Creek, where the trunk and papers were found, minus the cash, and clothing. The thieves escaped.

Several other thefts are noticed.

The circumstances of a foul murder, committed about ten miles south-east of Warsaw, on the person of a Mormon named Durfee, are also stated. About 11 o'clock on Saturday last, a stack of straw, near the house of a man named Samuel Hancock, was set on fire. The inmates of the house, among whom was the deceased, ran out to extinguish the flames, when they were fired upon by some person or persons in the vicinity of the stack, and Durfee was instantly killed. Major Warren is said to have arrested three persons on suspicion, but the nature of the evidence against them, is not stated. Durfee, it is said by the Signal, was not a prominent Mormon nor particularly odious to the anti-Mormons. The Mormons say that there were twelve guns fired -- another story is, that six were discharged, and that two were snapped at Sol. Hancock. The Signal, while intimating that there was some mystery about the reasons for the murder, denounces it, and seeks to relieve the anti-Mormons from the odium of it. A meeting of citizens of Warsaw took place on Monday evening, for the purpose of expressing their disapprobation of this, and other recent acts of violence, and this was done by resolutions then passed. They pledge themselves to aid in bringing the guilty persons to punishment, and tendered their services to Major Warren for this purpose.

On the night of the 12th, some persons went to the house of a Mormon named Rice, who was suspected of having murdered a man named Daubenheyer -- of which we gave an account at the time -- took him out, and set fire to the premises. Everything was consumed. This act is also denounced.

The Mormons have disposed of nearly all the lands, to which they have any title, in the south part of Hancock county. This is the case in the vicinity of Fountain Green. Around La Harpe, but few sales have been made, and this is the case in the neighborhood of Nauvoo. They are said to ask unreasonably high prices for it -- but of this both dides may be permitted to judge.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Saturday  Morning,  December 6, 1845.                         No. 106.


 

==> The Nauvoo Neighbor says that the Mormons have nearly two thousand five hundred wagons completed for the journey to the Pacific next spring. Many strangers are visiting Hancock county and Nauvoo for the purpose of purchasing property, and they are invited to do it.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Saturday  Morning,  December 13, 1845.                         No. 112.



==> Two of the Nauvoo Saints were arrested in Burlington, Iowa, on the 29th ult., for passing counterfeit money. Their names were Cyrus Chase and Rufus Adams. Counterfeit money was also found upon them. They were both committed for trial

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. II.                             Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  December 17, 1845.                             No. 2.



THE  MORMONS.

It will be seen from the following letter from the widow of the Prophet, that this extraordinary and baneful delusion is continuing to lose its power, and be exposed by those who have had the best opportunities to learn its history and true character. We are inclined to believe, that the insanity of which Mrs. Smith suspects her husband, was a moral and not mental madness -- the insanity of crime -- the madness of desperate wickedness.

                                                        From the N. Y. Sun.
"Important letter from Mrs. Smith, Widow of the Mormon Prophet. -- The following interesting letter from Mrs. Smith, widow of the late General Joseph Smith, the Mormon Prophet, came to us yesterday by private conveyance from Nauvoo. It will be read with great interest, as giving probably the most correct though brief view of the affairs as at present existing among that unhappy people:

NAUVOO, Ill., Nov. 20th, 1845.
          To the Editor of the N. Y. Sun:
SIR: -- I hope to be excused for addressing, for the first time in my life, a letter to the editor of a Newspaper, and this I have been induced to do, from seeing the letters of Gen. Arlington Bennett, published in the newspapers, urging the Mormon people to remove to the Pacific Ocean, and advocating the cause of the Tyrants, who have seized on the government of the Mormon Church. This church, such as it is, was formed by my lamented husband who was martyred for its sake, and whether true or false, has laid down his life for its belief!

I am left here, sir, with a family of children to attend to, without any means of giving them an education, for there is not a school in the city, nor is it intended there shall be any here, or at any other place, where the men who now govern this infatuated, simple minded people, have sway. I have not the least objection that these petty tyrants remove to California, or any other remote place, out of the world if they wish; for they will never be of any service to the Mormons, or the human family, no matter where they go. -- Their object is to keep the people over whom they rule in the greatest ignorance, and most abject religious bondage, if these poor, confiding creatures remove with them, they will die in the wilderness. The laws of the United States are quite good enough for me and my children, and my settled intention is to remain where I am, take care of my property, and if I cannot educate my children here, send them to New York or New England for that purpose. Many of the Mormons will, no doubt, remove in the Spring, and many more will remain here; and nothing would give me greater pleasure than to have a mixed society in Nauvoo, as in other cities, and all exclusive religious distinctions abolished.

I must now say, that I never, for a moment, believed in what my husband called his apparitions and revelations, as I thought him laboring under a diseased mind; yet they may all be true, as a Prophet is seldom without credence or honor, excepting in his own family or country; but as my conviction is to the contrary, I shall educate my children in a different faith, and teach them to obey and reverence the laws and institutions of their country. Shall I not, sir, be protected in these resolutions against the annoyances of the men I now oppose, for they will no doubt seek my life!

What object Gen. Arlington Bennett has in advocating the cause of these petty tyrants, I am unable to understand, for he assured me, when at my house, that he had not the smallest intention of connecting himself [in any manner] with them, much less removing with them to the Pacific Ocean. But this is a strange world; and I would not be surprised if they had offered to anoint and crown him King or Emperor in the West! As I have something more to say, I will take the liberty to write you another letter.
With great respect,
          I am sir, your humble serv't,
                EMMA SMITH.

This is a strong and very important document and written by a clear headed and strong minded woman. We have now, for the first time, and through the most authentic channel, the intelligence that the wife of the prophet, possessing his entire confidence, had no belief in the truth of Mormonism, and thinks that her husband labored under complete hallucination. This is the impression everywhere sustained, excepting among the followers of the prophet themselves. Mrs. Smith, in this letter, clearly shows, and frankly admits, the cause of all the difficulties among the Mormons. They have no schools. They have no moral culture. The leaders are either selfish or ignorant, without character and principle, and consequently such a class of people had better emigrate anywhere, and allow a mixed and moral people to occupy Nauvoo, and probably carry better principles, and more honorable views than the Mormon Council seem to encourage. Mrs. Smith deserves credit for separating from such a class of unfortunate and ignorant bigots, and throwing herself upon the laws of her country to educate her children as citizens of the Republic. -- Gen. Bennett, to whom she alludes in her letter, is now here, and governed by no other views than kind feeling towards those people. We have shown Mrs. Smith's letter to the General, and he pronounced it genuine."



MORMON  NEWS.

We would hardly be excusable, did we issue our paper barren of Mormon news, in these times when every movement of that peculiar people is subject to editorial comment. We learn from passengers on the last boat up, that two Mormons had fallen victims to the fury of the mob, who, it seems, can scarcely bear the idea of them leaving peaceably.

O. Olney. one of the Mormon elders, has published a pamphlet at St. Louis, in which he agrees with all who have preceded him in respect to the iniquities practiced at Nauvoo. He says that many of the poor, deluded saints are fully impressed with the idea that if they commit a sin, no matter how heinous, at the command and counsel of the Twelve, that it will lie at the door of the Twelve. The influence of these leaders is so great, that they have but to utter the command to commit a crime however horrible, and it is immediately done. One of Brigham Young's sayings is: "The Bible is no more to the people of this generation than a last year's almanac, for I am all the Bible needful for the people now, if they obey my counsel!"

The editor of the Cincinnati Commercial says that he is informed that Almon Babbit, authorized agent for the Mormons, is in that city for the purpose of effecting a sale of the lands and buildings at Nauvoo, including the great temple, to the Catholic Church. Mr. Babbit states, that it is positively the intention of the Mormons to dispose of their property to the Catholic Church, and to remove out of the present jurisdiction of the United States over the Rocky Mountains, there to establish a separate government. "From what we can learn," says the above authority, "Mr. B. has as good as effected a sale of the Mormon city to the Church above named."

Mr. Curtiss can rest assured that the above is a "humbug," and that the Mormons, so long as existing an organized body, will not part with their Temple but with their lives. -- Davenport Gazette.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Wednesday  Morning,  December 31, 1845.                         No. 126.


 

THE MORMONS. -- The brother of Joe Smith, the Mormon prophet, who claims to be the patriarch of the religious sect, has published in one of the Cincinnatti papers, a letter, from which we make the following extract. He says:

"I am the oldest member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; and in conjunction with my father's house, I was the founder and builder of the Church, and my proclamation and withdrawal from the workers of iniquity in the Church, (but not from the Church itself) on account of their wickedness, was long prior to their pretended CUT OFF! They have no power to cut me off; for I did not derive my priesthood from these wicked men, but from more able, and powerful personages, and from God the first author of all good; and from the original principles of Mormonism, as taught by my brother Joseph. The rule of the eleven apostles is a wide departure from the original plan, and a most base apostacy, and God has cut them off, and given them up to strong delusions to believe a lie that they might be damned, and all who adhere to or believe the eleven will follow a set of thieves, forgers, adulterers, whoremongers, murders and sorcerers, and be partakers of their sins; and will suddenly be destroyed, and that without remedy."


Note: LDS Presiding Patriarch and Apostle, William Smith (later called William B. Smith) was deposed from his ecclesiastical offices by the Fall 1845 Conference held at Nauvoo. On Oct. 19, 1845 he was excommunicated as a result of charges brought against him by the Council of the Twelve. The date of William's letter in the Cincinnati newspaper was probably in mid-November 1845, a few weeks after he issued his Proclamation: And Faithful Warning to all the Saints... at Galena, Illinois (reprinted in the Warsaw Signal of Oct. 29, 1845).


 



Vol. ?                         Pittsburgh,  January 28, 1846.                         No. ?


 

HOAX. -- The New York Sun contains a letter from Dr. J. M. Bernhisel, from Nauvoo, enclosing a letter from Mrs. Smith the widow of Joseph Smith, in which she positively asserts that the letter which recently appeared in that paper, purporting to have been written by her, was a forgery. The letter alluded to was extensively copied and thought to be genuine.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


Vol. XIII.                     Saturday  Morning,  February 28, 1846.                         No. ?.



LATEST FROM NAUVOO.

We conversed with a gentleman on Monday night last, direct from Nauvoo. (and who, while there, observed closely the movements of the Saints) from whom we obtained some interesting items. He states that about one thousand or twelve hundred had already crossed the river, among whom were the Twelve, the High Council and all the principal men of the Church, and about one hundred females. They had been crossing night and day for several days, and were still crossing when he left. His information he derived from one of the principal men of the Church, with whom he was acquainted several years since, from his own observation and from the corroborative statements of many with whom he conversed.

The plan[s] of the Leaders, as he them from these various sources, is this: The present company is designated as a pioneer corps. It will progress about 500 miles westward, where it will halt, build up a village and put [in a] spring crop. Here it will remain until the emigrants who start in the Spring come up, when another pioneer company will start for a point about 500 miles further west, where another village will be built and a fall crop put in. In the Spring, the company remaining behind will move on this second station, and the pioneers march on 500 miles further and repeat the same operations as before. This is the plan, as understood by the people of Nauvoo who were about starting. -- Many of those who now go as pioneers will return as soon as the [corn] is is, for their families.

Our informant further relates that nearly all appear anxious to start in this first company, and many are making a sacrifice of all they possess in order to enable them to do so.

They are evidently not prepared to go, and will inevitably suffer great hardship, if not starvation itself, on the way, but so infatuated are these fanatics, that they seem willing to rush into the very jaws of destruction, in order that the will of their leaders may be obeyed.

A. Babbitt, Heywood, formerly of Quincy, and Fulmer, are the agents left behind, to dispose of the property of the church remaining unsold.

The Twelve appear apprehensive, as is proven by the fact that they crossed the river on Sunday night in a great hurry. Some of the Hancock Guard arrived in the city on Monday morning; probably it was a knowledge of their coming that hastened their departure.

We place the utmost reliance on this information, coming as it does from a gentleman of high character, who had every opportunity to obtain correct knowledge of the plans and operations of the Saints --   Warsaw, Sig. Feb. 11.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 38.                      Washington, Pa., Saturday, March 14, 1846.                      No. 36.



ANOTHER  MORMON  HUMBUG.

A short time since, Sidney Rigdon, the great apostle of Mormonism in this city, informed his hearers that if they would prepare their houses, they might expect a visit from seven of the distinguished inhabitants of the heavenly world; namely -- Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Elijah, Daniel and Malachi. Accordingly the "brethren" prepared for the expected visitors, but they didn't arrive. It appeared, however, that in the meantime, Sidney had received another Revelation, informing him, that the visit would be confined exclusively to those, who freely gave up all their property to the Lord. About twenty complied with the request, and waited for the angels, but once again they did not come. Sidney, as in the previous case, had in the interval received another Revelation, informing him that it would be inconvenient for the angels to call at the different houses, and he thought it would be more advisable for the "brethren" to call at his house and there await the coming of the heavenly messengers.

The evening [was] named -- the company assembled -- and all waiting with the utmost impatience for the visitors. The time of their visit was fixed between 8 and 10 o'clock. Soon after eight, one of the "brethren" rose and said he saw the angels standing before the throne of God -- another said he saw them on their way. And at the moment they were looked for to enter, Sidney arose and said, that they had returned to heaven, and could not possibly be there on that evening. The meeting broke up in disorder, one charging the other with having deceived. But Sidney, by some art silenced them.

Thus ended the grand farce of the angel's visits, which we are inclined to think "were few and far between," on that particular evening.

This shows how easily men can be gulled. We are sorry indeed that in the nineteenth century, men will permit themselves to be led away by such fanatics as Sidney Rigdon & Co. Sidney was wise enough to secure the property of his followers, and which they will never get back.
                                                           Pitts. Eagle.


Note 1: Another instance of Sidney Rigdon facilitating a visitation of "angels" is recorded in his own May, 1845 newspaper, the Pittsburgh Messenger and Advocate: "we kneeled, and in solemn prayer we asked God to accept the work we had done; during the time of prayer there appeared over our heads, in the room, a ray of light forming a hollow square, inside of which, stood a company of heavenly messengers, each with a banner in his hand, with their eyes looking downward upon us, their countenances expressive of the deep interest they felt in what was then passing on the earth; there also appeared heavenly messengers on horseback with crowns upon their heads, and plumes floating in the air, dressed in glorious attire until, like Elisha... even my little son of fourteen years of age saw the vision; and gazed with great astonishment, saying, that he thought his imagination was running away with him, after which we arose and lifted our hands to heaven in holy convocation to God, at which time, it was shown an angel in heaven registering the acceptance of our work..."

Note 2: The following account from Thomas Ford's 1854 book, History of Illinois, may be relevant here: "It is related that the prophet's [Smith's] early followers were anxious to see the plates; the prophet had always given out that they could not be seen by the carnal eye, but must be spiritually discerned; that the power to see them depended upon faith, and was the gift of God, to be obtained by fasting, prayer, mortification of the flesh, and exercises of the spirit; that so soon as he could see the evidences of a strong and lively faith in any of his followers, they should be gratified in their holy curiosity. He set them to continual prayer, and other spiritual exercises, to acquire this lively faith by means of which the hidden things of God could be spiritually discerned; and at last, when he could delay them no longer, he assembled them in a room, and produced a box, which he said contained the precious treasure. The lid was opened; the witnesses peeped into it, but making no discovery, for the box was empty, they said, "Brother Joseph, we do not see the plates." The prophet answered them, "O ye of little faith! how long will God bear with this wicked and perverse generation? Down on your knees, brethren, every one of you, and pray God for the forgiveness of your sins, and for a holy and living faith which cometh down from heaven." The disciples dropped to their knees, and began to pray in the fervency of their spirit, supplicating God for more than two hours with fanatical earnestness; at the end of which time, looking again into the box, they were now persuaded that they saw the plates."


 


Vol. XIII.                     Saturday  Morning,  May  14, 1846.                         No. 240.


 

AN ANTI-MORMON MEETING, composed of the citizens of Hancock county, Ill., was held at Carthage on the 23rd ult., at which resolutions were adopted, urging the anti-Mormons of the county not to act against the Mormons, without the consent and support of the citizens of the nine counties which went into convention last fall. They also express the opinion, that nothing short of the removal of the entire body of Mormons from the county will restore peace.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


WASHINGTON  REPORTER.

Vol. 39.                         Washington, Pa., Saturday, May 22, 1847.                         No. 46.



MORMONS. -- We have copied from Eastern papers, recently, several statements of the setting Westward of a new tide of Mormon emigration. The delusion of Joe Smith, which it was supposed would be mainly dispelled by the death of that individual, and completely destroyed by the banishment of its victims from Nauvoo and the presence of the Great Temple, we should judge from sundry paragraphs that have recently met our eye, to be increasing both in England and Eastern sections of the United States -- another proof, added to the many lessons of history, that persecution only waters the seeds of error, and causes them to germinate and spring into vigorous growth where without it they would barely pierce the clod and after a while die out.

The last reference to the passage of the Mormons Westward which we have seen, is in the Pittsburgh Gazette of the 6th instant, which says: "We have noticed for several weeks past, various parties of emigrants to the West passing thro' this city. An unusual portion of them are well dressed, intelligent persons, from the Eastern States. We think they are the most substantial persons who have gone West for a long time. We have noticed none, apparently, in better circumstances. To our surprise a gentleman who has every opportunity of knowing, assures us the great majority of them are Mormons."

And while these deluded creatures are thus seeking a new home in the West, hundreds of the victims of mob violence who were driven from Nauvoo, are perishing in miserable encampments in the forests beyond the Mississippi. -- Cincinnati Gaz.


Note: The above excerpt leaves off the final two lines of the Gazette's report: "We have no doubt, from our informant's knowledge, that such is the fact. It is a source of deep regret that numerous families -- for the parties included a considerable number of such -- should have been led away by this strange delusion."


 

Democratic  Banner.

nsVol. I.                         Clearfield, Pa., Saturday, January 8, 1848.                             No. 7.



DIVORCED  FROM  A  SPIRITUAL  WIFE.

The Supreme J. Court, sitting at Boston, has decreed a divorce from the bonds of matrimony, beftween Henry Cobb and his wife Augusta Cobb, on the application of the husband, who alleged that the wife had lived at Nauvoo, as the "spiritual wife" of Brigham Young. Geo. J. Adams, known as Elder Adams, testified to the, fact & the subject of a conversation with Mrs. Cobb, in which she acknowledged that persons had a right to live together in unlawful intercourse, and said it was right. The testimony of Mr. Adams was corroborated by a widow lady, who had been to Nauvoo, and while there had taken the first degree in the mysteries of the Mormon Church. The second degree gave the privilege of spiritual wifehood. Mrs. Cobb took this degree, and urged the witness to take it, and spoke of her connection with Young. Mr. Adams said that Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormons, did not teach the doctrine of spiritual wives.


Note: See also the Quincy Whig of Dec. 22, 1847.


 


THE  COUNTRY  DOLLAR.

Vol. I.                         Clearfield, Pa., Wednesday, July 25, 1849.                             No. 5.



The Mormons at Beaver Islands.

The Beaver Islands -- ten in number -- lie in the bosom of Lake Michigan, in about latitude 45 deg. 50 min., and are beginning to attract considerable attention, both on account of the healthfulness of their climate, the extent of their fisheries, and as the Zion or land of promise of a considerable body of Mormons, the followers of Mr. Strang. Big Beaver Island, the principal one of the group, is 13 miles in length, by seven in breadth, containing about 50,000 acres of fertile and well-timbered land. Paradise Bay forms the principal harbor, and is the seat of an extensive trade in fish, wood, &c. It is easily accessible, perfectly land-locked, and sufficiently capacious for all the craft on the Lakes. Around this bay the Mormons are making their settlements. There are two wood-yards and three stores in operation, a steam saw-mill is going up, and improvements are commenced on all the lands within four miles, beside various commencements in other locations. There are now employed in the fisheries some 200 boats and 500 or 600 fishermen; but the opening of farms, the building of mills, and the establishment of alll the various branches of business, always found in a settlement of a free and enterprising population, will soon leave this branch of business of comparative non-importance. Good stocks of cows have been brought on by the Mormons, who are intending to devote much attention to agriculture, with every prospect of success. Notwithstanding the high latitude, all the fine grains flourish, and the prospect is that the grazing will be of the first quality. In case they shall succeed, they will be able to furnish supplies to the Lake trade, at a point where there is no competition within 200 miles, and where the demand must always be great.

The Mormons have already established a school, at which, they furnish gratuitous instruction to the children of the Indians residing in the Vicinity. In about 6 weeks they will commence the publication there of a weekly paper, the press and materials for which are already purchased. -- Their numbers on the island are now about three hundred, but it is expected that before, the close of the season they will be increased to 1000 in number. -- Buffalo Express.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 
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