READINGS  IN  EARLY  MORMON  HISTORY
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Adams County, Illinois

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1845 Articles



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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  January 29, 1845.               No. 41.



MORMON  MEETING

The Mormons held a meeting at the Court House in this city on Monday evening last. Two of the brethren from Nauvoo spoke, and if their speeches were evidence of their christian feeling and benevolence. Heaven help all such as are compelled to fellowship with them.

The object of the meeting and the exertions of the two Saints who made themselves conspicuous on the occasion, was to create sympathy, for the poor down-trodden, persecuted Mormons, and if possible to save their city charter.

They most positively denied the charges bro't against the Saints, of stealing -- declared the Mormons were the most heavenly and perfect people on the earth, &c., &c.

During the evening, the proceedings of a public meeting, held at Nauvoo, were read -- characterized by the most vindictive and bitter feeling.

One of the resolutions of this meeting, was very abusive of the Warsaw Signal, Alton Telegraph and Quincy Whig: -- it charged those prints with disseminating the principles of mobocracy, and their columns had been, and were occupied by the "pens of murderers" to "deafen the cry of innocent blood," but we have not the time and room to follow the proceedings through, and show their bitter malice and hatred of every thing, saving Mormonism.

This people preach up their benevolence and a great liberality towards mankind in general. But after reading their resolutions denunciatory of the presses, alluded to, what hope would there be for the safety of the presses -- The Alton Telegraph, Warsaw Signal, and the Quincy Whig -- were those wretches to exercise unlimited sway. The assassin's knife and the incendiary's torch would be the order of the day. Where they had the power they have destroyed one press already under a law of their own creation, and they would destroy every press in the Union, [saving] only such as upheld their doctrines, if they could secure the opportunity.

Away with all mock sympathy say we. They have violated the laws of the State -- they have thrown a whole community into anarchy and confusion -- they have abused privileges, which the people of this State in their simplicity have extended to them -- then let those privileges be taken from them, and they be put on an equality with other denominations and sects. We shall refer to this subject again.


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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  February 5, 1845.               No. 42.


 

A MORMON CONFESSION. -- Mr. Brigham Young, one of the leading men at Nauvoo, published some time since an epistle to the elders abroad, of which the following is an extract:

==> "Elders who go abroad and borrow horses or money and run away with it, will be cut off from the church without ceremony; and they need not look for that lenity which they have had heretofore!"

Ah! the "elders who go abroad" do sometimes forget themselves, and ride off other people's horses, do they? They must be more careful in future, as the Gentiles, or world's people, are waked up to a knowledge of their iniquities. The wonderful coolness of the worthy Brigham, in the above epistle, would lead sinners to suspect that a bridle or a halter was given each elder as a part of his instructions when he departs on a mission. "They must not look for that lenity they have heretofore received!" That's rich -- truly!


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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  February 12, 1845.               No. 43.


 

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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  February 19, 1845.               No. 44.


 

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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  February 25, 1845.               No. 45.


 

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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  March 5, 1845.               No. 46.



THE  MORMON  DIFFICULTY

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The Mormon Charter which had been previously passed by the House of Representatives, has been defeated in the Senate, as it ought to have been, by a majority of seven votes.


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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  March 12, 1845.               No. 47.


 

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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  March 26, 1845.               No. 49.


 

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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  April 9, 1845.               No. 51.


 

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Vol. VII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  April 16, 1845.               No. 52.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  April 23, 1845.               No. 1.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  April 30, 1845.               No. 2.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  May 21, 1845.               No. 5.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  June 11, 1845.               No. 8.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  June 25, 1845.               No. 10.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  July 9, 1845.               No. 12.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  August 20, 1845.               No. 18.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  September 24, 1845.               No. 23.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  October 1, 1845.               No. 24.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  October 8, 1845.               No. 25.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  October 15, 1845.               No. 26.

 

NOOTKA OR VANCOUVER ISLAND, on the north-west coast of North America, we have it from good authority, is to be the final destination and home of the Mormon people. -- This island is about 300 miles long, and 75 to 100 in width. It is separated from the main land by a long, narrow strait, and lies between the 47th or 48th and 51st or 52nd degrees of north latitude, extending along the coast in a north-west direction. The boundary line between the American and the British possessions will probably pass across the island. The English, we believe, have one or two trading posts on the island, but for the most part it is inhabited by Indians, of not a warlike disposition. It is a long journey, but can be accomplished. If the Mormons do emigrate to that distant land, they will be out of the reach of harm from white men, and may enjoy their peculiar notions in quiet, until the devil breeds his own discords and confusions among them.

We understand from the same authority that companies are rapidly organizing at Nauvoo, for an early start in the spring. -- The Church authorities and leading men will go out in a very large company, and without doubt the remainder will follow.



==> It is said that Wentworth, member of Congress from the Chicago district, designs to emigrate with the Mormons to Vancouver Island. His paper would seem to lead to that impression. He intimates that none but Whigs are anti-Mormons.

 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  October 22, 1845.               No. 27.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  October 29, 1845.               No. 28.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  November 5, 1845.               No. 29.



Proclamation of Bill Smith.
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We have just finished the perusal of Bill Smith's Proclamation, addressed to the Saints all over the world. It is a rather singular focument, and were it not so long, we would lay it before our readers. But as that is out of the question, we will give short extracts from it, on certain subjects, upon which he throws some light. Bill contends that he, himself, is the only real Patriarch in the Church -- that the office descended to him from his brother, and that all other Patriarchal offices are of no effect. He also claims that the legal respresentative of the Church, as their Prophet is young Joseph Smith, now a child. He says he always oppised the use of profane oaths by the elders, but they would persist in it -- and also in the Spiritual wife system, of whom the founders are B. Young and P. P. Pratt. Lawyers and Doctors seem to have been unpopular with the leading spirits of Nauvoo. On one occasion, when Taylor and others had abused the lawyers and doctors, Smith rebuked him for it, when he says:

"My remarks had little or no effect, for again and again it was repeated on the stand by Kimble, Young, Taylor, and others, that lawyers must leave, for it was then a time of peace, and that if they did not, they should be offered as a sacrifice...

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  November 12, 1845.               No. 30.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  November 19, 1845.               No. 31.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  November 26, 1845.               No. 32.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  December 3, 1845.               No. 33.



MORMONISM.

Almost every day brings forth something which shows the folly and corruption of Mormonism. A short time since, Mr. Smith, the "Patriarch," and brother of Joseph, the Prophet, renounced and denounced the leading authorities at Nauvoo, and exposed much of their villainy and criminal conduct; we now have the testimony of another, and from his language, a very sincere witness of Mormon depravity, and the way things are managed at the Holy City. This witness is Mr. O. Olney, "Elder of the Church of Jesus Christ," as he styles himself. He has published a pamphlet entitled "Spiritual Wifery at Nauvoo Exposed." We have not seen the pamphlet, but extracts from it which are of sufficient interest to be made public. He says, he has read the Proclamation of Mr. Smith, and so far as his knowledge extends, believes that Smith has set forth plainly and clearly the corruptions of Nauvoo and its leaders. He says he visited Nauvoo with the expectation of finding it a place of piety and virtue, but found it a place where profane language, was in common use with all classes -- he has heard the name of the Almighty profaned in the presence and hearing of the Twelve, and instead or reprimanding the blasphemer, they excused the matter by saying that the person "used to be an infidel, but is a first rate fellow now!" He further says:

"The Twelve often meet in council to give advice to any one who may choose to ask it, and also to give orders to those in authority under them, and one such occasion, I have witnessed where three six shooters (revolving pistols,) were laid on the centre table, and one fifteen shooter, (rifle) stood in the corner to protect the persons of the Twelve, although an armed guard are posted every night around the city, and every street guarded by police, armed with (some of them) large heavy canes with an iron or steel point, also pistols and bowie knives, and others around the houses of the Twelve thus shielding them from any intrusion in the night time, and in the day time they are (unless they are secreted for fear of being arrested for some of their misdemeanors,) walking the streets in their Broadcloths, while their followers are toiling to support them in their luxury and extravagance.

As it respects the late troubles in the county, I am prepared to say in truth as follows:

The Twelve by their unbounded influence over their subjects, and by teaching...


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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  December 10, 1845.               No. 34.


 

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Vol. VIII.                 Quincy   Illinois  Wednesday,  December 31, 1845.               No. 37.


 

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