READINGS  IN  EARLY  MORMON  HISTORY
(Newspapers of California)


Misc. California Newspapers
1857-1859 Articles


Los Angeles, California, 1857  (from an old engraving)


1845-1856   1857-1859   1860-1899   1900-1979



WSt Feb 28 '57   MDm Feb 28 '57   MDm Mar 07 '57   MDm Mar 28 '57   WSt Jun 12 '57
WSt Jun 26 '57   Alt Jul 01 '57   WSt Jul 03 '57   Alt Jul 09 '57   LAS Oct 03 '57
LAS Oct 10 '57   SFH Oct 12 '57   Alt Oct 12 '57   WSt Oct 13 '57   SFH Oct 13 '57
SFH Oct 15 '57   MDm Oct 17 '57   LAS Oct 17 '57   Alt Oct 17 '57   Alt Oct 18 '57
Alt Oct 20 '57   Alt Oct 21 '57   LAS Oct 24 '57   Alt Oct 27 '57   SFB Oct 27 '57
SFH Oct 27 '57   SFB Oct 28 '57   Alt Oct 28 '57   MDm Oct 31 '57   LAS Oct 31 '57
Alt Nov 01 '57   SFH Nov 03 '57   Alt Nov 05 '57   SFH Nov 05 '57   WSt Nov 06 '57
LAS Nov 07 '57   SFB Nov 12 '57   Alt Nov 12 '57   LAS Nov 14 '57   MDm Nov 21 '57
MDm Dec 05 '57   MDm Dec 12 '57   LAS Dec 12 '57   Alt Dec 23 '57   MDm Dec 26 '57
LAS Jan 30 '58   LAS Mar 04 '58   Alt Mar 11 '58   Alt Apr 13 '58   LAS May 08 '58
SVn May 29 '58   SFB Jul 21 '58   SFB Aug 12 '58   Alt Aug 13 '58   Alt Aug 29 '58
Alt Sep 07 '58   Alt Sep 14 '58   Alt Sep 23 '58   Alt Oct 18 '58   Alt Oct 22 '58
SFB Oct 29 '58   SFB Dec 21 '58   SFB Apr 23 '59   Alt May 14 '59   Alt May 19 '59
Alt May 22 '59   Alt May 28 '59   Alt May 29 '59   SVn May 30 '59   SFB May 31 '59
Alt Jun 04 '59   WSD Jun 05 '59   SFB Jun 06 '59   WSD Jun 12 '59   SFB Jun 14 '59
SFB Jun 17 '59   SFB Jun 24 '59   Alt Jun 24 '59   Alt Jun 26 '59   Alt Jul 01 '59
Alt Jul 13 '59   SFB Jul 16 '59   Alt Jul 20 '59   WSD Jul 31 '59   SFB Aug 13 '59
SFB Aug 25 '59   SDU Sep 01 '59   SFB Sep 17 '59   Alt Oct 03 '59   SFB Oct 17 '59
SFB Oct 22 '59   SFB Oct 27 '59   Alt Oct 27 '59   SFB Oct 28 '59   Alt Dec 27 '59


Articles Index   |   1850s Utah newspaper articles

 


TO CORRECT MIS-REPRESENTATION WE ADOPT SELF-REPRESENTATION.
Vol. I.                            San Francisco, Feb. 28, 1857.                            No. 52.



OBITUARY.
______

PRESIDENT JEDEDIAH MORGAN GRANT, who died at his residence in Great Salt Lake City, at twenty minutes past ten P. M. of December 1st., 1856, was the son of Joshua and Thalia Grant; and was born in Windsor, Broom county, New York, on the 21st day of February, 1816.

He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints by Elder John F. Boyington, on the 21st of March, 1833.

In 1834 he went to Missouri with the company of Saints styled "Zion's Camp," and in the fatigues, privations, trying scenes and arduous labors endured by that handful of valiant men, exhibited a goodly portion, for one so young, of that integrity, zeal and unwavoring effort and constancy in behalf of the cause of truth, that have so invariably characterized his life.

On his return from that mission he was ordained an Elder, and on the 22nd of May, 1835, went forth among the people preaching the gospel and baptizing, in company with Elder Harvey Stanly.

In the winter of 1835-6 he assisted in the labors upon the Temple in Kirtland, Ohio; and after receiving his blessings, started, April 13, 1836, on a mission to the States east of that place. During this mission, most of his time was spent in the State of New York, where he preached much in various places and baptized twenty-three persons in Fallsburg, one of whom was his brother Austin, and several in other localities; and returned to Kirtland on the 6th of March, 1837....

In June, 1843, he was sent to preside over the Branch in Philadelphia, and returned to Nauvoo in March, 1844.

On the 9th of May he started from Nauvoo in company with Elder Wilford Woodruff and Gen. A. Smith, whom he accompanied through Illinois, preaching as opportunity offered, and returned and was in Nauvoo at the period of the martyrdom of the Prophet Joseph and Hyrum.

He married Miss Caroline Vandyke in Nauvoo, July 2, 1844, Bishop Newel K. Whitney officiating.

He bore the tidings of the Prophet's massacre to the Twelve and brethren in the eastern States, and resumed his station of presiding in Philadelphia, whither he took his wife, and where he wrote and published several truthful and cutting strictures upon the doctrines and course of Sidney Rigdon and his followers...

Great Salt Lake City was incorporated on the 19th of January, 1851, and at the first election held under the charter, on the 1st Monday of the next April, Br. Grant was elected Mayor, which office he magnified and held uninterruptedly and by unanimous vote, to the day of his death.

In 1851 he again went to the States, where he spebt much time in Philadelphia and Washington, and wrote several letters to Jas. G. Bennet, Editor of the New York Herald, and also published them in pamphlet form under the title of "Truth for the Mormons." -- Those spicy and unanswerable letters had a salutary effect in allaying the excitement, tried to be raised by certain foolish officials who ran from here yelping at their own shadows. He returned in 1859...

Br. Grant needs no eulogy, and least of all such a one as our language could portray, for his whole life was one of noble and diligent action upon the side of truth, of high toned and correct example to all who desire to be saved in the kingdom of our God. As a citizen, as a friend, a son, a husband, a father, and above all as a Saint, and in every station and circumstance of life, whether military, civil, or religious, he everywhere and at all times shed forth the steady and brilliant light of lofty and correct example, and died, as he lived and counselled, with his "armor on and burnished." -- And though all Saints deeply feel his departure, yet they can fully realize that it redounds to his and our "infinite gain."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, February 28, 1857.                                 No. 48.

 

==> It is expected that Mr. Jno. Hyde, Jr., (late an Elder in the Mormon church) will lecture in the Church on Coloma st., this (Saturday) evening. His subject "Mormon morals."

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, March 7, 1857.                                 No. 49.

 

LECTURE ON MORMONISM, BRIGHAM YOUNG, &c. -- The Rev. Mr. Hyde, an intelligent and pleasing speaker, a seceding Mormon Elder, lectured in our town on Saturday, Monday and Tuesday nights, to crowded, attentive and delighted houses, on the rise, progress and corruptions of the Mormon fanaticism -- to call it religion would be a misnomer. If half what he asserted be true, a viler or more depraved sect never polluted the earth. He quoted freely from the sermons of Brigham Young, published by authority in the Deseret News, to sustain his positions. -- He gave them credit for great patience, industry and perseverance. He frankly confessed that Brigham was a remarkable man -- energetic, shrewd, penetrating, intellectual -- a deep thinker, a plausible, insinuating speaker, and thoroughly understanding human nature. He was a man of iron will and dauntless courage -- more of an enthusiast than knave. His sermons were more forcible than elegant -- more passionate than profound -- destitute of religious fervor, but abounding in vigorous passages. His comparisons were often vulgar, sometimes blasphemous, but never weak or obscure. Kimball was a weak, vain. ignorant, scheming, deceitful, fawning scoundrel. The Mormons generally were ignorant, superstitious, fanatical -- implicitly believing in what their Elders taught, and slavishly submitting to the most intolerable bondage. The Elders discouraged education, and kept the converts busily employed to prevent them from thinking.

On Monday night a Mr. Cook, and elderly man, an Elder of the Mormon church, after Mr. Hyde had concluded his lecture, asked permission to reply to him, which was readily granted. His language was so outrageous and disgraceful that the audience, out of self-respect, were compelled to stop him. Filth flowed from his mouth as freely and as offensively as from the sty of a hog. He refuted not one of the arguments of Mr. Hyde -- controverted not one of his assertions. He injured the cause he advocates, and convinced all who heard him that if we are to judge of the fruits of Mormonism by the language of its teachers, it is depraved beyond redemption. Mr. Hyde, in perfectly respectful language, replied to him, but his sarcasm was withering, and every word fell with the force of a sledge hammer, blistering and burning like red-hot iron.

On Tuesday evening Mr. Hyde lectured to the largest audience we have ever seen in Placerville on a similar occasion. Every seat in the Theatre, long before the lecturer arrived, was occupied, and every available spot was taken up. He confined himself exclusively to an exposition of the impostures, inconsistencies and contradictions -- flagrant and absurd in the extreme -- of the book of Mormon. He traced its history from its appearance up to the present time, and proved to the satisfaction of all present that that portion of it which was not stolen, was the silliest, weakest, shallowest of humbugs. He has evidently studied his subject carefully and understands it thoroughly. He read a verse from the book, in which a fearful curse is pronounced against polygamy, and stated that in England the Mormons indignantly deny that it is part of their creed. They contradict their own words -- repudiate their own book. Many of the wretched beings now at Salt Lake, having awakened from their delusion, would willingly leave it, but they cannot get away. The best way to root out Mormonism, in his opinion, is to settle the country round them with inhabitants of a different persuasion. He deprecated violence, and said, we use his own language -- "At no time, under no circumstances, can mob violence be justified. Any and every infraction of the laws must, sooner or later, be atoned for." -- Men who censored us not a year ago for using similar language, cheered it when uttered by another, so vacillating is public opinion.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, March 28, 1857.                                 No. 52.



Mormondom.

The Western (Mormon) Standard of the 20th inst., contains a lengthy and characteristic letter from our pure and saintly Mormon friend, Elder Cooke, who evidently imagines himself "some punkins," in reply to our strictures on his indecent language and the lecture of Mr. Hyde. With unusual modesty, which takes us completely by surprise, he confesses that his communication is "filthy," and hopes -- an unnecessary hope -- "it will not sully the pages of the Standard by an insertion! Of course not, Elder; nothing better was to be expected from you, and its "filth" was its chief recommendation. It is a precious morecau, and will give you a free entry into the refined society of Salt Lake City. You must be aware that it takes an extra quantity of "filth," and evidently there is an abundance of it in the city of the Saints, it we are to judge by the language of the Elders it sends out among the Gentiles, to "sully the pages" of a Mormon paper, or the reputation of a Mormon Elder.

We confess that we have not been initiated into the fascinating mysteries of Mormonism, nor do we know much about it, but the little that we do know is not creditable either to the doctrines taught, the teachers, or the members of the church. From our limited knowledge of it, and from Mr. Cooke's own admissions, it is admirably adapted to suit the tastes of depraved men; and if the great Mormon leader Brigham Young [does] not slander his brethren, a greater set of graceless scamps, liars, thieves, swindlers, perjurers, bloats, gamblers and libertines never polluted the earth, than are to be found at Sat Lake, in the very bosom of the church. Mr. Hyde read an article from the Deseret News, written by Brigham, in which he boasted that the Mormons could "beat the world at bragging, lying, cheating, swindling, swearing, drinking," &c., &c. We do not make these charges -- we only quote the authority of the church. We do know, however, that Mormonism, when it was tolerated in Illinois, blighted the fair name of the State, and drove many respectable families from it, who could not be forced to believe that prostitution was a virtue or blasphemy religion. Elder Cooke says:

"I told them I had yet to learn that Mormonism professed to introduce any new principles, that it was eternal, immutable truth, and claimed to be nothing more or less than the ancient gospel restored, and that it was either what it claimed to be or it was the most stupendous delusion which had ever been visited upon the world."

You did tell them so, and Mr. Hyde proved that you either did not understand or were wholly and inexcusably ignorant of the Mormon doctrine. He named a number of "new principles it introduced," disgraceful and repulsive as new, which you tacitly admitted. If it be "eternal, immutable truth," why does it so frequently contradict itself? It cannot be true and false at the same time. Mr. Hyde read a number of passages from what is termed the Mormon bible, flatly and positively contradicting each other. Truth is not inconsistent, but the Mormon bible certainly is. If it "introduced no new principle," said Mr. Hyde, "there is no necessity for it; if it has introduced new principles let us investigate them and see if they are good and worthy of inculcating." He, not Elder Cooke, for the Elder was too prudent to mention some of the slight vagaries of Mormonism, named a number of the "new principles introduced" by the Mormon Book, every one of which was in direct opposition to decency and religion. Mormonism, according to its own authority, cannot be what it claims to be, and must therefore be in the graphic and truthful language of Elder Cooke, "the most stupendous delusion that has ever" cursed mankind.

We must take one more extract from our amiable Elder's letter before we dismiss him. He says, with no little assurance:

"Mr. Hyde did not show us that a better state of things existed in what is called the Christian or civilized world than existed in Utah."

He did far better, Elder, -- he proved by Brigham's own voluntary statements, published by himself in a boastful manner, that Utah could beat the world in every species of villainy. No man better understands or is more thoroughly acquainted with the peculiar characteristics of the society he governs, than the libidinous Governor of Utah Territory. He is the "father confessor" of the men, women, and children, their spiritual as well as their temporal master; he knows all their secrets and kindly indulges them in all their innocent whims. What he says of them must be true, for he would not needlessly injure the reputation of his friends, nor bring reproach and disgrace on his congregation by attributing to them imaginary crimes. How a worse state of things could by any possibility exist in a heathen country than exists in Utah, if Mormon authority may be relied on, we cannot imagine. They are superstitious, ignorant and depraved, says Brigham, and Brigham ought to know. They are a deluded people, and are more the object of our pity than our detestation. We are charitable enough to think even Elder Cooke more of a dupe than a vicious man.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TO CORRECT MIS-REPRESENTATION WE ADOPT SELF-REPRESENTATION.
Vol. II.                            San Francisco, June 12, 1857.                            No. 14.



The Mormons and the "Vigilantes."

The Alta California, true to its instincts, still continues to utter its threats and denunciations against the Mormons, and appears to be determined that its puny efforts shall not be wanting to aid in bringing to pass the destruction of which it has talked so much of late. -- In its issue of Monday we find another long tissue of slanderous charges against the people of Utah, which is extracted from an anonymous communication published in the Washington National Intelligencer, purporting to have been written by a man who spent, it is said, nearly twelve months in Utah, and was engaged in business connected with the transit of the mails and from that Territory. This communication is written over the nom de plume of "Verastus," and has neither the date, nor the name of the place where it was written attached to it and does not afford the slightest clue, except the peculiarities of its structure, by which its writer can be identified. It may have been written in Great Salt Lake City, in Washington or San Francisco; though it we were to judge by the article itself, we should say that it was written from California by a certain notorious U. S. ex-Associate Judge of Utah Territory. Every characteristic of the letter bears the impress of ex-Judge Drummond's handiwork. But whether he be the author of this communication or not, it makes at present but little difference; the communication itself affords another very striking instance of the evidence that is brought to bear against "Mormonism." The editor of the Alta no doubt thinks it irristible, and publishes all the charges that are made, accepting them as a further confirmation of what has already been published by Drummond. But does it not strike that sapient gentleman that a good, loyal, honest man would certainly affix his name, place of residence, etc., to a document of such importance as this. Who is this man that condemns a whole people as being traitors, disloyal, etc. and recommends the Government in such earnest language to esert its power in breaking them up? Does the editor of the Alta know his name? If he does, let him make it public... Are the editors of the Alta ready to endorse this? Hear what he says on this subject:

'Now permit me to conduct you to San Francisco, Cal., on the ever memorable 18th day of August, 1856, and behold the streets of that ill-fated city thronged with men and arms. The Federal Constitution has been upheaved, the laws overthrown, and the "Committee Vigilantes" have instituted a reign of terror. The Committee lays down its power and calls out its adherents to celebrate its retirement to law and order. The streets are decorated and hung with flags, but, alas, the star spangled flag of the free was set aside! 'The all-seeing eye over the crescent' on which was inscribed "Vigilantes," occupied the foreground, with a United States flag on the other side. Immediately in the rear of these, also in the centre, hung the Mormon emblem (sworn [sic - worn?] by them as military badges) of the "bee hive and bees;" in the rear of these, between other U. S. flags, was the "Lone Star" on blue ground, surrounded by a constellation. These are the prominent ensigns of Mormondom. No one knew the object of the secret order "Vigilantes" but those who recognize Brigham as their prophet, Priest and King. The Vigilant Committee of 1851 was an experiment of Mormon strength, headed by Samuel Brannan, Parley P. Pratt, and others, and the Vigilance Committee of 1856 may be regarded in the same light. If not Mormon, let some one assign reasons for the setting aside of the United States flag and the display of the ensigns of Mormondom.'

... It would be useless for us to make an elaborate denial of these statements of "Verastus" to the people of San Francisco or California... The idea of mixing up Governor Young or Parley P. Pratt's name in the organization of the Vigilance Committee of San Francisco is so absurd that our only wonder is that any San San Franciscan could be found to endorse and publish as correct, the testimony of a man who would make such statements....


Note: According to Dr. Robert Kant Fielding, "Judge [William W.] Drummond... had been absent from his post in Utah for almost a year by the time President Buchanan decided to take action. During this time, Drummond was in California where he wrote newspaper articles, denouncing Mormon behavior, using the pen names Amicus Curiae and Verastus. In April, 1857, he traveled east by way of Panama [and] New Orleans, where he wrote a letter of resignation to the Justice Department. As his reason for resigning, Drummond cited the ungovernable nature of the Mormons under the leadership of Brigham Young."


 



TO CORRECT MIS-REPRESENTATION WE ADOPT SELF-REPRESENTATION.
Vol. II.                            San Francisco, June 26, 1857.                            No. 16.

 

TO OUR CORRESPONDENT. -- A long communication was forwarded to us last week from Placerville for publication, exposing the falsehood, inconsistency and folly of John Hyde, jun., who traversed this State a few months ago striving to expose what he phrazed, the doctrines and practices of the Mormons. The communication is well written, the reasoning good, and to honest men, conclusive; but we scarcely think it appropriate for publication at present. It would be attaching a degree of importance to Hyde and his efforts which we are far from feeling, and would be a salve to vanity which we do not wish to apply. We would as soon think of shooting at a dead dog as to fire a column or two of arguments at him at present. He and his revelations and slanders are completely eclipsed and almost forgotten in this State, and a similar fate awaits him in other States. The man who lectures or writes against "Mormonism" enjoys but an ephemeral popularity at best. "Mormonism" is too progressive in its nature for the success of such individuals to be permanent. The doctrines and practices of to-day which they may expose, are overshadowed to-morrow by others which to the world appear so much more odious, that their tales are no longer worthy of notice, and unless they have a fertile and ready invention, they sink into insignificance. This is the fate which has befallen those who preceded Mr. Hyde, and it inevitably awaits him and all who follow in his footsteps.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Wed., July 1, 1857.                            No. 171.



The  News.

...The Administration appears determined to exterminate Mormonism from the Territory of Utah, and two thousand troops under General Harney, had been detailed to proceed forthwith to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. Our latest telegraphic advices state that a Governor had been selected to supercede Brigham Young, last name seems not to have been made public. The rumor that Judge Drummond had been appointed, is contradicted.

The notorious Parley Pratt, one of the leaders of this accursed sect, has been killed by an old Californian named Mclean, whose wife he had seduced, after making a proselyte of her to his faith.



THE MORMON NEWS. -- Although the dates from Salt Lake, received in the Atlantic States are not so late by a fortnight as those which have reached us, via Carson Valley, yet news of importance is brought by this arrival. As will be seen, a prominent official and others have been compelled to flee for safety to the mountains. Of course the Deseret News, the organ of Mormonism, makes no mention of the outrages practiced by the Saints, and hence the reason of our not being before informed of the fact published in this day's issue.



Killing of Elder Pratt, the Mormon.

The world renowned Mormon elder, Parley Parker Pratt, was shot on the 14th of May, near Van Buren, Arkansas, by Mr. Hector McLean, late of this city, whose wife Pratt had induced to becaome a Mormon, and then seduced her. She, sometime since, endeavored to elope with her paramour, taking with her her children, but was foiled in the attempt. In a short time afterwards she, howeverdecamped, and Mr. McLean, at the request of her parents, sent her children to their residence, in New Orleans. Thither she went, declared she had abandoned the Mormon faith, and on the first opportunity, fled with her children. McLean was written to, and, like a true man, followed the fugitive from State to State, and at length found Pratt at Fort Gibson. Here he had him arrested, when, after a short trial, he was set at liberty, to the disgrace of the Commissioner. Pratt then procured a horse, and rode away as quick as he possibly could; but yet too slow for McLean, who overtook him at the end of eight miles, and shot him. He lived two hours, during which time the execrations of the people were heaped upon him. Letters from Pratt to Mrs. McLean were discovered, and they were most diabolical.



Troops for Utah.

The administration have at last decided upon sending a formidable body of troops to Utah. Orders have been issued for the dispatch to that Territory of the Second Regiment of Dragoons, the Fifth and Tenth Regiments of Infantry, and Capt. Phelps' battery of Light Artillery, numbering in all some two thousand men, under the command of Gen. Harmey. This is said to be only the beginning of the movement.



High-handed Proceedings of Brigham Young.

Brigham Young is carrying things with a high hand in UTah. Accounts from Great Salt Lake, to the 15th of April, state that great excitement prevailed there. The Saints had commenced the work of expelling the Gentiles. Judge Stiles, the United [States] Marshal, the Surveyor, and a large number of others had left the Territory, fearing their lives were in danger. If the news is to be credited, the issue between the Mormon leaders and the government is fully made up, and Gen. Harney and his troops will not reach Utah a moment too soon.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TO CORRECT MIS-REPRESENTATION WE ADOPT SELF-REPRESENTATION.
Vol. II.                            San Francisco, July 3, 1857.                            No. 17.



Assassination of President P. P. Pratt.
______

By this mail was brought the melancholy and heart sickening intelligence of the murder of our beloved brother, President Parley P. Pratt. This diabolical transaction will no doubt be the signal for a general jubilee throughout California, as it has already been in the East, and will be a cause of congratulation and rejoicing among all those who hate the servants of God. Their triumphing, however, will be but short. God will, ere long, come out of his hiding place and vex the nations [----- ------ ----- -------] for blood. He will require the lives of His servants at the hands of their murderers. He has sent them Apostles and Prophets and they have slain them, crying, "their blood be upon us and our children." Their request will be granted...

(under construction)


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Thurs., July 9, 1857.                            No. 179.



The Killing of Pratt --
Letter from Mr. McLean.

We published a few days since, a very extraordinary article from the Mormon Standard of this city, a paper established and set up on this outpost, by Brigham Young, for the purpose of correcting the errors into which we ignorant Gentiles fall, in relation to the true character of Mormonism. This article was in relation to the killing of that hoary-headed seducer, Parley P. Pratt, who had exemplified the beauties of the system of which he was one of the most prominent and learned expounders, by stealing from her husband the affections of a wife, robbing him of his children and "sealing" himself in an adulterous union, as his seventh wife, the wife of another, the mother whose duties were owed to her family. The tool of Brigham Young, who publishes this treasonable and filthy sheet in this community, denominates the just retribution, which at the hands of an injured husband, has overtaken the lecherous old villain, Pratt, as a "murder," and blasphemously compares him and his death to our Saviour and his crucifixion, and calls down the vengeance of the Almighty upon his "murderer," at the same time giving rather strong hints that the blood of "Parley" will be avenged, and that right soon.

Whether the hot blood which must now be seething and boiling in the veins of Brigham Young and his satellites, at Salt Lake, is to be cooled by the murder of Gentiles who pass through their territory, whether the "destroying angels" of Mormondom, are to be brought into requisition to make reprisals upon travelers, or whether, as has been done before, "Saints" disguised as Indians are to constitute themselves the supposed ministers of God's vengeance in this case, we are not informed, but have no doubt that such thoughts, such intentions as these are prevalent among those saintly villains, adulterers, and seducers of Salt Lake, who, did they receive their just deserts, would be where Parley Pratt is now, in a world where hypocrisy and saintly fraud will not pass current.

It is not for us here, to enter cooly upon any argumentation, to justify the course which Mr. McLean took to rid the world of as great a scoundrel as ever infested it. There are occasions and circumstances under which it seems that an injured, wronged, ruined in peace of mind, and heart-broken man has a God-given right to take the satisfaction of his deep wrongs into his own hand. There are cases which the law cannot reach, cases which deserve the severest punishment; and if there ever was such a one, this of Mr. McLean's is it. Bulwar, in one of his plays, only utters a sentiment which is implanted deeply in our natures, that "when dishonor enters our homes, law dies, and murder takes the angel form of justice." The wronged husband has practised upon this precept, and the civilized world will, we believe, applaud the act.

We have been permitted to examine a letter from McLean, written to a relative in this city, after the shooting of Pratt, and which details, with heartfelt earnestness, the trials and troubles, and anxieties, endured by him in his search for his children. Most of the particulars, however, do not differ from those which have been already given, and we therefore only publish below, Mr. McLean's own account of the closing scenes in this tragedy. The narrative commences after he had secured the children from his wife:

On leaving Fort Gibson, the Marshal made a demand on the Commander for a command of soldiers, to aid him to make the arrests, which he directed to follow follow him the next day. The Commander complied, and started my best and true friend, Capt. Little, off that morning with a company. My friend, Mr. Shaw, who had been for some time trying to come across Pratt's whereabouts, happened to ascertain that Pratt, or a person calling himself Parker, had that morning -- (the day Capt. Little left to follow the U.S. Marshal) -- crossed the Arkansas river about two miles from the Fort, in company of a young Englishman. It struck him at once that this was none other than Pratt, and his Mormon spy of North Fork. He pursued him, and soon overtook Capt. Little and his command, and instantly informed him that he believed Pratt was ahead of them going the same way. Capt. L. quickened his march, and soon came up with Pratt, and arrested him. Capt. L. told me that as soon as he did so, and informed him that it was at my instance, that he never saw consternation until then -- the fellow fairly wilted.

The day Capt. Little left Fort Gibson, myself and the children, and a dozen of my Masonic friends, who gathered from all parts of the territory to aid me should the government not take any notice of my grievances, they got to North Fork simultaneously with the Marshal. The Marshal and E. J. also started that morning for Fort Gibson. We met the Captain and his command about half-way, resting at a spring, and having Pratt a prisoner, in the centre of a circle of soldiers.

He, I am told, had pretty sorrowful greetings for his "seventh" wife when she presented herself, and the two met. Pratt was tied with his own rope, and the end of it given ti a soldier, and the party marched off to Fort Gibson.

To avoid contact, I, with my friends, proceeded to the Creek Agency, where we were hospitably received by friend Whitfield and his lady. I started the following morning for Fort Gibson, with an escort of my Masonic brethren, and got there in safety. Remaining with the children at Fort Gibson two nights, I met with an excellent opportunity of accompanying one of the officers and his lady to Fort Smith. He drove his wife and the children in his carriage, and I rode his horse, and on getting there took us to his father-in-law's (Major Elias Rector) house, where we were kindly and cordially received, and where I had the children until I left the place. On going to Van Buren, the next morning, with Major Rector and Capt. Cahel, his son-in-law, and my devoted friend, we found a great assemblage of people awaiting the opening of the Unoted States Court, and found that my affairs had created the most intense excitement. I soon found that the parties could not be punished, as I had not sufficient evidence to convict them. Various propositions of revenge and redress were offered and proposed to me by the best men of the place and surrounding country, but I kept my purposes to myself. That day, the Marshal arrived with the prisoners, and locked Pratt in jail at his own request, and took E. J. to the hotel.

The next day they were called into court, and I was a witness. The officers of the court paid such deference to my feelings that they dismissed Eleanor before calling upon me to testify. I was allowed to state the history if my grievances, and to read the evidences of my wrongs to the court, and to about five hundred spectators. In fact, the court-room was crowded. I exceeded any previous effort of my life at relating to others the burden of my soul's anguish. I was kindly permitted to implicate the scroundrel in court, Parley Parker Pratt, as the principal cause of all my sorrows. I succeeded admirably in producing the most intense excitement; I really twice thought the crowd were about making a move to lay hold of him and tear him to pieces. The Commissioner concluded it necessary, in order to save him from mob violence, to adjourn the further hearing until 4 P.M., of that day.

The crowd reluctantly permitted him to be locked up again in jail; and when 4 P.M. arrived, the court-room was crowded long before the time, and the yard in front likewise. The Comissioner not deeming it prudent to bring him out then, postponed the case until after breakfast the next morning -- under pretence of having some witnesses for the defence to summon in the meantime. I knew they could have none, and that it was done to slip Pratt off quietly that night. My friends, anticipating this result, kept a watch all night on the jail, and the Marshal, fearing an attack, kept a watch also. So Pratt could not be gratified -- "allowed to depart at the twelfth hour."

About 8 o'clock the following morning, instead of being called into court, his horse was taken round to the jail, and he was released -- mounted and "put." Friends, soon after missing him, came and apprised me of it, got me a horse -- O pursued him; they followed and overtook me, and we overtook Pratt, and I killed him!

I am not able to say how you will view the act, but I look upon it as the best act of my life. My duty to myself demanded it; my duty to my children, demanded it; my duty to my relations, demanded it; and my duty to society, demanded it. And the people of West Arkansas agree with me in this view of the commission of the deed.

I was permitted to leave Fort Smith, five miles from Van Buren, where I had the children, two days after, in a carriage with my children, about noon of the day.

This fell at the hands of a deeply injured man the hoaty-headed seducer of his wife -- the robber of his children. And who of us shall blame him, or say that, under the circumstances, we would have acted otherwise? We know of cases in this city, where, through the meddling interference of Mormon missionaries, other families have been broken up, other wives estranged from their husbands, family ties dissolved, and misery entailed upon all the victims of this accursed system. A few such examples as have been made in the case of Pratt, will have a tendency to put a stop to these interferences, and where the evidence is as string as it was in his case, we do not believe that the world would do else than justify a similar course of action.


Notes: Word of Pratt's murder reached Utah on or about the 23rd of June.


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, October 3, 1857.                         No. 21.



Rumored Massacre on the Plains.

We have just been informed by Judge Brown, of San Bernardino, who has arrived in town from that city, that a rumor was prevalent there, and had obtained general belief, that a whole train of emigrants from Salt Lake city, for San Bernardino, composed of twenty-five families, comprising ninety-five persons, men and women, had been cruelly massacred on the road, between the last settlements in Utah Territory and the boundary of this State.

All the property of the company had been carried off, and only the children left, who were picked up on the ground, and were being conveyed to San Bernardino.

This intelligence was brought on by another party who had started from the city after the reported missing company, and who had overtaken the mail carrier in the Cajon Pass, where he is said to have encamped on Wednesday night.

No further particulars are known, nor any names given, [or] any account of the finding and disposition of the bodies. We give the rumor for what it is worth. The alleged facts are without authenticity as yet, the party not having arrived in San Bernardino at the time our informant left.

Although the rumor was generally believed in San Bernardino, we confess our unwillingness to credit such a wholesale massacre.


Note: This was evidently the first published account of what came to be known as the "Mountain Meadows massacre." In the 1962 edition of her well-known book on the subject, historian Juanita Brooks reproduces a 1932 letter of Frances Haynes, that refers to "the eleven miners or plainsmen who rode into Los Angeles in the fall of 1857 and reported the murder of the Emigrants at Mountain Meadows in Utah." Exactly how the report given by these purported "plainsmen" corresponded with that of Judge John Brown (mentioned above) remains undetermined.


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, October 10, 1857.                         No. 22.



HORRIBLE  MASSACRE  OF  EMIGRANTS!!
Over 100 Persons Murdered!!
Confirmation of the Report.

In our last publication, we gave the substance of a rumor which had just then reached us, of the massacre of a large party of emigrants on their way to this State, by Great Salt Lake City. We were unwilling at first to credit the statement and hoped that rumor had exaggerated the facts, but the report has been confirmed, and the loss of life is even greater than at first reported. This is the foulest massacre which has ever been perpetrated on this route, and one which calls loudly for the active interposition of the Government. Over one hundred persons have fallen by the hands of the merciless destroyer[s], and we hope that immediate steps will be taken by the authorities to inflict a terrible retribution on those concerned. There is no longer reason to doubt the facts -- we have them from different parties, and all agree in placing the number of the slain at over one hundred souls, men, women and children.

The details, as far as yet known, are these: A train of emigrants, from Missouri and Arkansas, for this State, were [waylaid] and cruelly butchered on the route, at a place called Santa Clara Canyon, near the rim of the Great Basin, about 300 miles from Salt Lake city. The scene of the massacre is differently designated as Santa Clara Canyon, the Mountain Springs, and the Mountain Meadows. But all agree in locating it near the rim of the Great Basin, and about fifty miles from Cedar City, the most southern of the Mormon settlements. Of a party of about 130 persons, only fifteen infant children were saved. The account was given by the Indians themselves to the Mormons at Cedar City, to which place they brought the children, who were purchased from them by the people of that city. Whether the cause assigned is sufficient to account for the result, or whether a different cause is at the bottom of the transaction, we will leave the reader to form his own conclusion. We can scarcely believe that a party traveling along a highway would act in the manner described, that is to poison the carcass of an ox, and also the water, thus endangering the lives of those who were coming after them. Yet this is the story told by all who have spoken of the massacre. It is stated, the emigrants had an ox which died, and they placed poison in the body and also poisoned the water standing in pools, for the purpose of killing the Indians; that several of the tribe had died from this cause, and that the whole force mustered, pursued the train, and coming up with them at the above named place, which favored their purpose, attacked and murdered the whole party, except a few infant children. The Indians state that they made but one charge on the party, in which they cut off the greater portion of the men, and then guarded the outlets of the canyon, and shot the men and women down as they came out for water; that one man was making his escape with a few children, and they followed him, killed him, and took the children, fifteen in number, the eldest under five years of age. The report was brought to San Bernardino by Messrs. Sidney Tanner and W. Mathews.

The following letter from Mr. J. W. Christian, of San Bernardino, to Mr. G. N. Whitman, of this city, has been kindly placed at our disposal, and we give it at length, as it is the fullest report of the massacre, and the cause which led to it, that has reached us. The writer seems to [intimate] that the Mormons will be held responsible for the murder, and in this respect he is fully borne out by present [indications], for a general belief pervades the public mind here that the Indians were instigated to this crime by the "Destroying Angels" of the church, and that the blow fell on these emigrants from Arkansas, in retribution of the death of Parley Pratt, which took place in that State. The truth of the matter will not be known until the Government make[s] an investigation of the affair. This should be done, to place the blame in the right quarter, as well as to inflict chastisement on the immediate actors in the fearful tragedy, who are reported to be the Santa Clara tribe of Indians. The following is the letter:

SAN BERNARDINO, October 4th, 1857.    
I take this opportunity of informing you of the murder of an entire train of emigrants on their way from Missouri and Arkansas to this State, via Great Salt Lake city; which took place, according to the best information I can possibly acquire, (which is, primarily, through Indians,) at the Mountain Meadows, which are at or near the Rim of Great Basin, and some distance south of the most southern Mormon settlements, between the 10th and 12th ultimo. It is absolutely one of the most horrible massacres I have ever had the painful necessity of relating.

The company consisted of about 130 or 135 men, women and children, and including some forty or forty-five men capable of bearing arms. They were in possession of quite an amount of stock consisting of horses, mules and oxen. The encampment was attacked about daylight in the morning, so say the Indians, by the combined forces of all the various tribes immediately in that section of the country. It appears that a majority of them were slain at the first onset made by the Indians. The remaining force[s] formed themselves into the best position [their] circumstances would allow; but before they could make the necessary arrangement for protecting themselves from the arrows, there were but few left who were able to bear arms. After having corralled their wagons, and dug a ditch for their protection, they continued to fire upon the Indians for one or two days, but the Indians had so secreted themselves that, according to their own statement, there was not one of them killed, and but few wounded. They (the emigrants) then sent out a flag of truce, borne by a little girl, and gave themselves up to the mercy of the savages, who immediately rushed in and slaughtered all of them, with the exception of fifteen infant children, that have since been purchased with much difficulty by the Mormon interpreters.

I presume it would be unnecessary for all practical purposes, to relate the causes which gave rise to the above described catastrophe, from the simple fact that it will be attributed to the Mormon people, let the circumstances of the case be what they may. But it seems, from a statement which I received from Elders Wm. Mathew and Wm. Hyde, who were in Great Salt Lake city at the time this train was there, recruiting their [outfit] and were on the road to this place at the time when they were murdered, but several days journey in the rear -- somewhere about the Beaver Mountains, which is between Parawan and Fillmore cities, that the causes were something like these: The train camped at Corn Creek, near Fillmore City, where there is an Indian village, the inhabitants of which have raised a crop of wheat, and a few melons, &c. And in trading with the Indians they gave them cash for wheat, and they not knowing the value of coin were severely cheated. They wanted a blanket for a sack of wheat, but they gave them fifty cents, and told them that amount would buy a blanket. They also had an ox with them which had died, and they put [some] strychnine in him for the purpose of poisoning the Indians; also put poison of some description in the water, which is standing in holes. This occasioned several deaths among them, within a few days after the departure of the train. And upon this, it seems, the Indians gathered themselves together, and had, no doubt [chose] the place of attack, and arranged everything before the train arrived at the place where they were murdered.

It was ascertained by some of the interpreters, from a few of the Indians who were left at Corn Creek, that most of the Indians in the country had left; but they could not learn for what purpose, and before any steps could be taken to ascertain for certain what was the cause, the story was told -- they were all killed.   Yours truly,
J. WARD CHRISTIAN.    

Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. ?                            San Francisco, October 12, 1857.                            No. ?

Topics of the Day.

In another column will be found the details of the horrible slaughter by the Indians of more than one hundred emigrants, at a point three hundred miles this side of Salt Lake City. After reading them, the conclusion can hardly be resisted, that the Mormons have had something to do with this cruel butchery. The statement that the Indians were impelled to fall upon the emigrants because they gave them money instead of goods for the things which they had purchased from them, and also that they placed poison in the body of an ox which had died, and also poisoned the pools, is not entitled to much weight, for, as the Star the paper from which we copy very justly remarks, it is hardly creditable ìthat a party traveling along a highway would act in the manner described, and endanger the lives of those coming after them. We are loth [sic] to believe that the Mormons, as bad as they may be, could have instigated this massacre; but when we reflect that there are grounds for believing that they had a hand in the murder of Gunnison and his party that there is in Salt Lake City an organization of blood-thirsty scoundrels, known as the Destroying Angels, who stop at no villainy, and that the persons murdered were from the State in which the Sainted Parley received the reward for his crimes, it is impossible to divert the mind from the suspicion that others besides the Indians had a hand in this horrible butchery. It will also be seen, that the San Bernardino Mormon, whose letter detailing the circumstances is given in another column, expresses the belief that it will be attributed to the Mormons, and it is an old maxim, that he who excuses, accuses himself; but our readers are competent to form an opinion on the subject themselves. All the facts relating to the subject, as far as known, are before them....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Mon., October 12, 1857.                            No. 174.



LATER  FROM  THE  SOUTH
______

ARRIVAL  OF  THE  SENATOR.
______

HORRIBLE  MASSACRE  OF  EMIGRANTS.
______

Over One Hundred Persons Killed!

By the arrival of the steamers Senator, from the South, and Commodore, from Oregon, we are enabled to lay before our readers the following interesting items.

Our dates from San Diego are to the 10th; and from Los Angeles to 3d, and from Santa Barbara to 8th....

HORRIBLE MASSACRE OF EMIGRANTS. -- J. Ward Christian writes to the Los Angeles Star as follows:   (see original letter in L.A. paper)

The Star gives further details in relation to the atrocious massacre on the plains. The details, as far as yet known are these: A train of emigrants, from Missouri and Arkansas, for this State, were waylayed and cruelly butchered on the route, at a place called Santa Clara canyon, near the rim of the Great Basin, about 300 miles from Salt Lake city.... (see original artocle in L.A. paper)

OUR  LOS ANGELES  CORRESPONDENCE....
______

LOS ANGELES, October 9th, 1857.    
Since the 1st inst., we have been receiving accounts of diabolical massacres upon the emigrant trail from Salt Lake. These accounts are still vague, and should be received with allowance for exaggeration or prejudice. The latest account states that a train of twenty-fove families, embracing more than a hundred persons, were massacred at the Vegas of the Santa Clara, about one hundred miles this side of the last Mormon settlement. Those who are known to have escaped are children. 10 or 12 in number, who are too small to give any account of the scene, and who were picked up near the spot and brought into San Bernardino by some parties who passed the spot afterwards.

The last report states that these immigrants were all from Arkansas and Missouri. They had been troubled by the Indians, who frequented their camps in great numbers; and they resolved to get rid of them. An ox was killed and strychnine put into the meat, which was left where the Indians could find it. It is also said that they poisoned the water, and that several Indians, among them several chiefs, died from the effects of the poison. The Indians were greatly enraged and followed the train several days, watching for an opportunity to avenge themselves. At the Vegas, where there is a good deal of thick brush, they came up with the train in large numbers, and their hostile attitude impelled the emigrants to make a stockade of their wagons on self-defence. They were cut off from water, and the only supply they received for themselves and animals was brought in by the little girls, who alone were permitted by the Indians to go out and fetch it. At the end of three days the little girls became so worn out by constant labor as to be obliged to desist. A man was then sent with a flag, but he was immediately shot, and the attack commenced. The Indians did not cease until every person except the children were killed. This was done with comparative ease, as the siege and privations they had endured had weakened a dispirited them.

It is further said that the Indians took the animals and wagons, together with a large number of children, and returned back to the Mormon settlements to sell them, and that this account is derived from the Indians themselves, who reported the reason for, and manner of the slaughter, in their arrival at the settlements.

This is the Mormon account of this horrible butchery. It was brought in by the mail rider, and also by some gentlemen who saw the bodies lying upon the ground. It may be as asserted, but there are many who do not believe it, and they charge the Mormons with the crime, or at least instigating it. It is well known that all the Indians in the Territory are baptized "Saints," and that the chiefs have taken an oath to "obey council." They are allies of the church, ready to act in its defence. The mail rider says that were he to deny that he is a Mormon, his life would not be worth defending, and that those Indians are instructed to kill all who oppose the church. I have been told by men from Salt Lake that on their recent visit to the Mormon settlements, Young saw many of the chiefs of tribes, and exchanged pledges of mutual assistance and defiance to the United States Government. In his contest with the government, if he stands out for a fight, he counts on those Indians as messengers of divine wrath to exterminate the ungodly.

We shudder at such wholesale butchery, and are almost incapable of expressing the sentiments that animate us. But we were prepared to expect such deeds, and more of them, because every one who comes from Salt Lake repeats the imprecations that are breathed iut against those [who] are under the ban. A large portion of our new population for a year past are those who have fled from Salt Lake, and almost every one of them has a tale of escapes from the pursuing Indians or angels. How long shall these murdering bands infest the highways of the nation? For years it has been asserted that it was not safe to travel over that uninhabited country, and that the danger was no more from Indian than Mormon vengeance. And there is no more protection to-day than there was when the first murder was committed.

The  Emigrant  Massacre.
______

We publish this morning an account of one of the most terrible wholesale slaughters which it has ever been the melancholy duty of a journalist to chronicle. Over one hundred emigrants, on their way to California, were attacked by a large force of Indians, and after a fight which lasted two days, those who were still left alive were mercilessly butchered, after having sent to their inhuman enemy a flag of truce, and thrown themselves upon their mercy.

This brutal affair fills up the measure of our rage, which travellers from the East to the Pacific coast have suffered from the Indian tribes which roam over the plains and dwell among the mountain fastnesses. Year after year the press of this State has been calling upon the General Government for the establishment of a lone of military posts, which should afford protection to emigrants; and, so far, our appeals have been disregarded. Whether this last outrage will awake the "powers that be" to action, remains to be seen. We sincerely hope it will.

The person who communicates the report to the Los Angeles Star, and who we suppose of course, is a Mormon, takes occasion to deny in advance that his co-religionists have instigated this massacre. This is a matter which should be strictly investigated by the government, and if it should be found that the Mormons have thus commenced carrying into execution the system of extermination of the Gentiles, which it has been for some time supposed they were concocting, prompt and adequate punishment should be administered to them. Will the authorities at Washington rouse themselves from their inertness, and make a full investigation of this whole matter?


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TO CORRECT MIS-REPRESENTATION WE ADOPT SELF-REPRESENTATION.
Vol. II.                            San Francisco, October 13, 1857.                            No. 29.



Massacre of Emigrants --
Reckless and Malignant Slanders

______

An extra of the Los Angeles Star contains an account of a horrible massacre of emigrants, which took place at the Mountain Meadows, near the rim of the Great Basin, between the 10th and 12th of Sept. The details, so far as known, have been given in a letter written by J. Ward Christian of San Bernardino, under date of Oct. 4th, to a gentleman in Los Angeles, and is published in the Star. The company consisted of about 130 or 135 men, women and children...

The fact that the massacre occurred somewhere within the boundaries of Utah, and the fact also that the train was from Missouri and Arkansas -- States against which, we are gratuitously informed, the "Mormons" entertain the most intense hatred -- are deemed a sufficient foundation upon which to base an accusation of the guilt against the Mormons. It is incredible, and utterly inconsistent with civilized human nature, in these [Gentile} editors' view of the case, for the emigrants to cheat the Indians, or to poison their water and the carcass of an ox. This is too hard a story to believe. But mark the difference, when there exists the slightest possible chance of attributing the most foul and atrocious deeds to an innocent people, because they are "Mormons," and live in the Territory where they are committed. It is not incredible to think that the "Mormons" either perpetrated themselves or instigated the Indians to perpetuate the murder of upwards of a hundred men, women and children, because, forsooth, they hailed from the States of Missouri and Arkansas! This is not too hard a story to believe -- it does not tax the credulity of these very incredulous gentlemen in the least. They can believe this without the slightest shadow of evidence; but transactions which every season's emigration witnesses -- the cold-blooded murder and poisoning of Indians, can not be believed, because, if believed, the "Mormons" could not be charged as the instigators of the massacre.

Inconsistent as it may seem with "civilized human nature," every man who has affected to discredit the story of the poisoning of the water and the carcass of an ox by the emigrants, must know that it is a practice of common occurrence on the plains, especially among "border ruffians," to shoot down every Indian they can get sight at, and to leave the poisoned carcasses of cattle as a means of entrapping the unsuspecting savage. If they had been killed in any other territory than Utah, the story would have been believed without hesitation; and it would have been said, that the emigrants provoked a most fearful retribution by their own acts.

We appeal to every honest, intelligent man to view all the facts of the case as they have thus far come to light, and ask, Is it not enough to drive any people mad, to be thus charged with an atrocious crime of this kind, when they know they are as innocent of it as the child unborn --- and when they know, also, that their accusers are no more warranted by the evidence before them in accusing them, than they would be in fastening a similar charge on the inhabitants of San Francisco? As if the feelings of the people were not already sufficiently hostile against the people of Deseret, a venal and incendiary press must seek to add fuel to the flame, and raise a feeling of embittered hatred against "Mormonism" and the "Mormons" in the breast of every man who will be influenced by them, or who will not take the trouble to think and investigate for themselves. What cause is there for wonder at our talking as plainly and independently as we do, when this state of feeling is so universally prevalent on all hands? Though we were filled with the most intense love for our compatriots, yet this persistent determination on their part to fasten upon us the commission of the most foul and unnatural crimes, regardless of all evidence and all our protestations of innocence, is sufficient to finally extinguish it. And the instance above is only one out of a numerous list that might be adduced; it is but another illustration of that utter disregard of justice and honor which has been continually exhibited by journalists and others in their treatment of the "Mormons." How long they expect we can endure such things, and not arise and resent them, we do not know; but such creatures may yet learn that there is a limit even to Mormon forbearance and endurance.



Since the arrival of the last Utah mail, there has been considerable speculation among our contemporaries, in regard to the result of the Utah expedition. The bold, independent and outspoken manner in which the people of Desert have made known their feelings of late; has had a startling effect on public journalists generally; and they begin to realize that there is a possibility of goading the inhabitants of that Territory, by a series of long continued acts of oppression, to the defence of their religion and homes. Of course it was expected that the "Mormons" would endure passively, as they had always heretofore done, every indignity that was to be heaped upon them. But even this was to have availed us nothing. The Administration organ in this city informed the public a few weeks ago, that the contingency of our submission had been foreseen, and such a course could not in any measure divert or change the policy resolved upon at Washington towards Utah. That policy as set forth by paper, was, to overthrow the practices at present prevalent in Utah and inaugurate a new order of things in their stead–to bring about collisions between the church and the officers of the law, and to do every thing in their power to efface every distinctive feature of "Mormonism;" or, to tell the policy in plain English, to prevent us from worshiping God according to the dictates of our own consciences. If resistance were offered to this violent and unparalleled deprivation of constitutional rights, an armed force was to be on hand, whose numbers and equipments were to be of such a nature as to stifle any such expedition at its birth.

But suspicions have lately been aroused in the minds of many, which make them think that if by any means the Mormons should be aroused to resistance, it might not be so easy a matter to accomplish all that had been laid out for the new officials to do as bad been imagined. Our bellicose neighbor of the reputed Administration organ, who has been noted for the fanfaronade he indulged in on the Mormon question and who predicted so confidently a few weeks ago, the speedy downfall of "Mormonism" and the subjugation of the "Mormon," now thinks that should a collision take place, and the "Mormons" be disposed to resist, a war would be commenced the most protracted and bloody the country ever engaged in, and which would require an immense outlay to bring to a termination. Well may he and his confreres of the press be startled at the train they have set in motion, and the consequences which are likely to attend the present movements towards Utah. If blood be shed, if a collision take place, and a war be commenced, a large share of the blame must fall upon the heads of leaders of public journals throughout the country. They have done all in their power to bring about such a consummation. Not content that the public should judge of the case themselves, and weigh carefully the evidence presented before them, they have sought with all their talents and the influence they could exert, to create a deep-rooted and deadly antipathy against the people of Utah and their belief, circulating the most base and malicious falsehoods concerning them, and keeping the public mind in a state of continual agitation and ferment. They have given publicity to the slanders of every vile and corrupt wretch that would denounce "Mormonism" -- have given place in their columns to every absurd and ridiculous story that has been started about the "Mormons," and have done al in their power to array the Administration against us; but in almost every instance, they have either treated with contempt or totally ignored every rebuttal of the false stories afloat respecting the Deseretians.

If "Mormonism" is to be overthrown and exterminated by the new Governor and the troops now on their way to Utah, and the different papers really state the truth when they affirm that this is the object for which they are sent, then it need not be expected that when the Mormons in that Territory are informed of the intentions, they will submit quietly to their enforcement. Where is the people that posses any claim to manhood, that are worthy of the blessings of liberty that would? We solemnly declare that, were we in Utah, and aware of the intentions of the officials and troops which are so boastingly and universally avowed in the public prints, we would never submit to such things. We have ever felt that the storms of liberty would be preferable to the serenity of slavery; and we know that there are hundreds in Deseret that feel as we do on this subject. Let this policy be carried out, and where is the liberty of conscience which the Constitution guarantees unto every citizen, "Mormon" or otherwise, and of which we vaunt so much?

The people of Deseret are willing and determined to abide by the Constitution and laws of their country, they were willing to be governed in a proper manner by the appointee of the Federal Government; but they are not willing to have that rule enforced at the point of the bayonet or the mount of the cannon.–They expressed their wishes to the Administration in relation to the Federal appointees who were to be sent in their midst; but their wishes were utterly disregarded. Instead of men being selected who would attend to the duties of their office; and not interfere with the religious rights of the people, officers have been sent whose especial mission, it appears, is to produce strife and disunion, and curtail the religious privileges of the people. Such a course dare not be adopted towards any other Territory than Utah, or to other people than "Mormons." It would be attended by too many serious consequences for any sane Administration to attempt. But, when pursued towards "Mormons," it corresponds with the treatment they have heretofore received, and becomes a fitting finale to the long list of wrongs which they have endured.

Talk about the people of Deseret declaring their independence; they have had sufficient provocation years ago, to declare themselves free and independent, not of the Constitution, laws and institutions of their fathers and of the land that gave them birth, but of the corrupt and partial administrators of those laws. They have never experienced such treatment as they ought, in common justice, to have received. They have been abused, vilified and wronged in the most outrageous manner–called murderers, thieves and every thing else that was vile, and not only called but treated as such–until the people have almost persuaded themselves that the "Mormons" had no rights, and that they were absolutely conferring a favor upon them by permitting them to live at all. The first settlers of other territories have been rewarded by large grants of land and the most liberal help and encouragement; but how has it been with the Deseretians? Though their labors in reclaiming the wilderness, in adding to the conveniences of traveling, and in enduring the peculiar hardships incident to a residence in that sterile and uninviting country, have been such as to draw forth the unwilling admiration from our enemies, yet, instead of seeking to encourage them, every thing has been done that would have the contrary effect. Appropriations have been withheld, or when not withheld, doled out with a niggardly hand; schemes have been concocted and made public, to deprive us of the land on which we have settled, and every measure put forward for adoption that would be likely to humble and annoy us. Our mail privileges have been cut off, and we have been looked upon and treated as outlaws and slaves, permitted to dwell by sufferance only, on a portion of that unoccupied land which we had taken so active a part in adding to the public domain. These are facts which can not be truthfully disputed, and they are facts, too, which the world know to be true.

(under construction)


Note: It would seem that the "limit... to Mormon forbearance" was revealed in the July 3rd issue of the Western Standard, when the editorial writer "granted" the supposed "request" of the Arkansans, that the blood of the deceased Parley P. Pratt, be upon them, and their "children." At least the murderers at Mountain Meadows retained enough of their humanity to preserve the lives of a few of those same emigrant "children," whilst inflicting Mormon blood atonement upon those children's parents and their older brothers and sisters. Editor George Q. Cannon's pious refutation of the murder charges (on the behalf of "destroying angels" whose activities he could not possibly entirely account for) reads like the typical LDS boilerplate self-justifications of the era. He laments the "utter disregard of justice and honor," while initiating the LDS cover-up of the massacre, which would stain the skirts of saintly justice and honor for generations to come. Given the usual pretensions of high Mormon leaders of that period, to elevated spiritual discernment, it seems remarkable that none of "the Brethren" ever apparently sought divine revelation in the matter -- or, if they did, they kept the truth of such revelatory information a closely guarded secret. For Elder Cannon, at least, the Mormons of southern Utah were "as innocent of it as the child unborn." Cannon (who became the second most powerful Mormon on earth) is not known to have ever admitted Mormon involvement in the massacre, nor to have expressed any remorse over that unholy involvement, over what he himself calls "the most foul and unnatural crimes."


 



Vol. ?                            San Francisco, October 13, 1857.                            No. ?



Topics of the Day.

The last fearful intelligence from the Middle Plains, should warn the people of California, that, until the subjugation of the turbulent Mormons and their sanguinary Indian allies, there is no safety either for mails or immigrants by that peril-environed route. Two years ago, an experienced army officer who had passed some months in Utah, not without profitable observation, declared he would not undertake to enforce the laws of the Untied States in that territory with a force of less than five thousand men. At that time, he computed the Mormon fighting population at ten thousand men; and he reasoned that in any contest with the United States, the followers of Brigham Young would avail themselves of the willing aid of the neighboring Indians. The army of Deseret has since been strengthened by large accessions. It has been exercised in the use of arms; abundant munitions of war have been manufactured in the settlements; the Indian tribes have been drawn into closer alliance; and the bold seditious tone of the Mormon Prophet give startling proof of his confidence in the strength of his position.…As if the fiery cross had been spied among them, the Mormons of Carson Valley and San Bernardino, are thronging to Utah in obedience to the summons of the Prophet. The atrocious massacre at the Mountain Meadows, tells its own tale; and in whatever light it may be viewed, and to whose instrumentality soever it may be attributed, has its own terrible significancy. There is no adult left to tell the story of their fearful butchery, but the Mormon Elders already screen the Indians to whom they impute its perpetration, by charging upon the Americans the first act of aggression. But it matters not by whom the deed was done; it is manifest that immigration by that route, until exemplary punishment shall be dealt out to the criminals, and that country be thoroughly subjugated and pacified, is wholly out of the question. There is no safety for mails or passengers until the military arm of the Government shall be felt throughout the length and breadth of Deseret.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. ?                            San Francisco, October 15, 1857.                            No. ?



Topics of the Day.

... it is argued that the [California] emigration has been left without protection, a large number of unfortunates had fallen victims to the incensed Saints or their Indian allies, and that their massacre was entirely chargeable to the Administration. But the Chronicle seems to have incautiously overlooked the fact, that the tragedy occurred three hundred miles this side of Salt Lake, and consequently, that even if the troops had arrived in Utah and held absolute possession, their presence there could not have afforded the protection to the train three hundred miles this side. By reference to a communication from an authentic source in to-days Herald, it will be seen that Orson [sic - William?] Hyde, one of the principal Saints, states that a great proportion of the murdered ones were Back Outs, Mormons disgusted with the rule of Brigham Young and his Danite crew, who had availed themselves of the fancied protection of a body of emigrants, to leave Salt Lake...



The  Emigrant  Massacre.

Editors of the San Francisco Herald: --

I have just had a conversation with Mr. B., who has read a letter from Orson Hyde, received here day before yesterday, (Oct. 7th,) from San Bernardino, at which place Hyde recently arrived, with an escort of thirty men, from Salt Lake, and where his letter was written to a brother Mormon here, Mr. L. He writes, that he left Salt Lake just two days after the unfortunate emigrant train passed that place, and overtook them in time to save the children remaining alive -- fifteen infants only; that the bodies of 118 persons, men, women and children, were lying upon the ground, a prey to the buzzards, many of whom were of the "back-out order," who had joined the California emigrant train for security in traveling. Hyde writes, that he learned from the settlers in the vicinity of the place of massacre, that the Indians fired upon the camp about two hours before before day, killing a large number, and then retreated. The emigrants then formed a corral with their wagons, and at daylight the Indians returned to the attack. That the fight lasted two days, when the emigrants sent out a little girl about twelve years old with a flag of surrender; that she was killed, and the entire train destroyed, leaving the bodies upon the ground, which Orson Hyde himself counted, (118,) he arriving at the spot just in time to gather up the fifteen infants, which he brought into San Bernardino. Hyde is going directly back to Salt Lake, and takes, per Brigham Young's [instructions], a large number of Mormons with him. The recipient of the letter thinks the fate of the back-outs just and merited. My informant don't believe it was the Indians who killed the emigrants.   V.


Note 1: The above text was taken from a reprint, published in the Olympia, Washington Pioneer and Democrat of Nov. 6, 1857.

Note 2: There are several problems with the above account -- written by "V," a Californian, who learned of the news from "Mr. B," who, in turn, read a letter supposedly sent by LDS Apostle Orson Hyde, from San Bernardino, to an associate of "Mr. B," who was "a brother Mormon, here (San Francisco?), Mr. L." -- "Lincoln"? The chronology of the account seems to be in doubt, as it asserts that Orson Hyde left Salt Lake two days after the Fancher party departed that city, and "overtook them in time to save the children remaining alive." Exactly what this means is unclear, but the writer appears to have made the conclusion that Orson Hyde was present in southern Utah, and had a hand in preserving the survivor children, before they were split up and placed with Mormon families in the area. there is no confirmation of these allegations to be found among contemporary historical records -- certainly Orson Hyde (nor anybody else) participated in moving the children to San Bernardino. Either the writer has grabled the information given him, or Orson Hyde made an otherwise unknown trip to southern California at the time of the massacre.

Note 3: Orson Hyde reportedly was present in Salt Lake City on September 10, 1857, when James Haslam arrived from the south, seeking counsel on how to deal with the emigrant train. Hyde says: "I happened to be in President Young's office... when the messenger from Cedar City, not far removed from the Mountain Meadows, arrived" (CHC IV:139-180; "Orson Hyde" MS, written by Joseph S. Hyde, p. 74). Given all of this evidence, it is safe to assume that "V" made the mistake of confusing the Mormon Apostle with the Mormon "mail-rider," William Hyde (whose situation in the late summer of 1857 somewhat fits that of the "Hyde" mentioned in the article).


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, October 17, 1857.                                 No. ?



Indian Outrages.

The horrible massacre of one hundred emigrants, near the rim of the Great Basin, some 300 miles from Salt Lake City, an account of which will be found in our columns, taken in connection with the outrages and murders of the Indians on the Northern route, have caused an excitement among the citizens of this State which can only be allayed by vigorous measures of redress on the part of our Government... The posting of a few companies of dragoons over an extent of fifteen hundred miles of unsettled country, seems to have no other effect than to convince the savages of the facility with which they may massacre with impunity. If a war is to be made upon the wild tribes of the Plains, we must prepare outselves for a war almost of extermination; their means of subsistence must be destroyed, their people slain, the sword, fire, famine and all the other means and appliances of civilized and barbarous warfare, including whiskey and pestilence, must be employed, before the white may with impunity journey over the Plains. From such a course the American mind recoils with horror -- from such scenes of desolation the humane eye is averted in disgust...

From the Los Angeles Star Extra of Oct. 10.

Horrible Massacre of Immigrants!!

(view original article from Los Angeles paper)


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, October 17, 1857.                         No. 23.



THE  LATE  HORRIBLE  MASSACRE.

In the early part of the week, an intense excitement pervaded [our] citizens on learning that parties had arrived in town, who corroborated the statements previously made in regard to the horrible massacre of one hundred and eighteen persons; on the Salt Lake route to California; and placards were posted throughout the city, calling a public meeting of the citizens to be held at the Circus Pavilion, on the Plaza, on Monday evening, to hear the statements of the parties alluded to, and to adopt such measures, in view of the facts, as should be deemed advisable. Accordingly, at the time appointed, a very large number of our citizens assembled, deeply impressed by the awful tragedy which had been enacted on the borders of our State, and anxious that such a representation of the facts in the case should be made to the authorities in Washington, as should compel them to take immediate steps to discover the perpetrators and instigators of the foul outrage, and inflict on them condign punishment. We need not here more particularly refer to the proceedings of the meeting, as they are reported elsewhere; but as we have obtained the statements of Messrs. Powers and Warn, the gentlemen above alluded to, which contain the nearest approach to an account of the massacre that can be given at present, we prefer to add them here, rather than in the report of the meeting.

The statements were drawn up, at the dictation of the parties, by Mr. W. A. Wallace, who read them to the meeting, and from whom we obtained them, through the chairman of the meeting, Mr. G. N. Whitman.

These documents exhibit a deplorable picture of the working of Mormonism, which, if correct, show the leaders of this sect to be actuated by the most atrocious designs towards their fellow-citizens of the Union. We hope for the sake of our common humanity, that the character of this people may be redeemed from the black catalogue of crime here preferred, and that it will yet appear that they are not the fiends incarnate they are represented, but that they used all possible diligence to prevent the late massacre, and that they act in good faith to preserve the lives of such of their fellow citizens as, from necessity or choice, travel through their Territory[, of] the common property of the citizens of the Union.

As each will draw his own conclusions from the narrative, without further comment we give the statements of Messrs. Powers and Warn, regarding the late Massacre of the Plains.

Mr. George Powers, of Little Rock, left Arkansas, and with his train arrived at Salt Lake in August. He says:

We found the Mormons making very determined preparations to fight the United States troops, whenever they may arrive. On our way in we met three companies of 100 men each, armed and on the road towards the pass [above Fort] Bridger. I was told at Fort Bridger, that at Fort Supply, twelve miles this side of Fort Bridger, there were 400 armed Indians awaiting orders; they also said that there were 60,000 pounds of flour stored at Fort Bridger for the use of their army. We found companies drilling every evening in the city. The Mormons declared to us that no U. S. troops should ever cross the mountains; and they talked and acted as if they were willing to take a brush with Uncle Sam.

We remained in Salt Lake five days, and then pushed on, hoping we might overtake a larger train, which had started ten days ahead of us, and which proved to be the train that was massacred. We came on [to] Buttermilk Fort near the lone cedar, 175 miles, and found the inhabitants greatly enraged at the train which had just passed, declaring that they had abused the Mormon women, calling them whores, &c., and letting on about the men. The people had refused to sell that train any provisions, and told us they were sorry they had not killed them there; but, they knew it would be done before they got in. They stated further, that they were holding the Indians in check until the arrival of their chief, when he would follow the train and cut it to pieces.

We attempted to purchase some butter here; the women set it out to us, and as we were taking it away, the men came running and charging, and swore we should not have it, nor anything else, as we had misused them. They appeared to be bitterly hostile, and would hardly speak to us. We were unable to get anything we stood in need of. We camped at this place but one night.

At Corn Creek, we found plenty of Indians, who were all peaceable and friendly. We learned nothing of the train, except that it had passed that place several days before, and we were glad to find we had gained so much on them. The next place where we heard of the train was on our arrival at Beaver, 230 miles from Salt Lake. Here we learned, that when the train ahead [was] [camped] at Corn Creek, which was thirty-five miles back, and at which place we found the Indians so friendly, an ox died, and the Indians asked for it. Before it was given them, a Mormon reported that he saw an emigrant go to the carcass and cut it with his knife, and as he did so, would pour some liquid into the cut from a phial. The meat was eaten by the Indians, and three of them died, and several more [of them] were sick and would die. The people at Beaver seemed also to be incensed against the train, for the same reason as before reported. I asked an Indian at Beaver, if there was any truth in the poisoned meat story; he replied in English, that he did not know, that several of the Indians had died, and several were sick; he said their water-melons had made them all sick, and he believed that the Mormons had poisoned them.

We laid by at Beaver several days, as the Bishop told us it was dangerous for so small a company as ours to go on. Our train consisted of only three wagons, and we were hurrying on to join the larger one.

While waiting here the train of Wm. Mathews and Sidney Tanner, of San Bernardino, came up, and I made arrangements to come on with them. We came on to Parowan, and here we learned that the train ahead had been attacked by the Indians, at the Mountain Meadows, fifty miles from Parowan, and had returned upon their road five miles to a spring, and fortified themselves. We then drove out of Parowan five or six miles, and camped at what is called the Summit.

Next morning an express arrived from Mr. Dame, President of Parowan, requesting us not to proceed any further that day, if we pleased; also, that Mathews and Tanner should return to Parowan, and bring me along with them. We returned, and a council was held, at which it was advised by Mr. Dame, that I should go back to my own train, as they did not wish to have strangers in their train. He also stated, that at two o'clock that morning, he had received an express from the train ahead, stating they were surrounded by Indians, who had killed two or three of their number, and asking for assistance. While we were talking, an express came in from Beaver, stating that the Indians had attacked my train in the streets of [that] place, and were fighting when he left. One reason given was that ten miles the other side of Beaver, an emigrant train had shot an Indian, which greatly enraged them; that the people of Beaver went out in the night and brought the emigrants in, and were followed by the Indians, who made the attack after their arrival.

On the receipt of this news, another private council was held; after which I was called in and told, that in consequence of the fight behind, it would be for their advantage to bring me through, provided I would obey council and the rules of the train. To this I assented, being anxious to get on, and asked what was required of me. Mr. Dame replied, that in passing through the Indian country, it might be necessary for me to be laid flat in a wagon and covered with blankets for two or three days, as the Indians were deadly hostile to all Americans; that if I was seen, it would endanger the safety of the whole train. My friend Mr. Warn was told that he would also go on, upon the same conditions.

At Parowan, it seems, when it was "for their interest" to bring us through, the elders had no control over the Indians, while at Buttermilk Fort, they were able to restrain them, as they declared, under great provocation.

On Friday, the 18th [day] of September, we left Parowan, and arrived at Cedar City, some eighteen miles, about one o'clock. During the afternoon, an express arrived from the Indians, stating one of their warriors had run up and looked into the corral, and he supposed that "only five or six of the emigrants were killed yet." These were the words of the expressman. The same night, four men were sent out from Parowan, to go and learn what was the fate of the train, and, as they pretended, to save, if possible, some of [its] members.

I omitted to mention, in the proper place, that Mr. Dame[, President of Parowan,] informed me that the attack on the train commenced on Monday, the 14th of September. I asked him if he could not raise a company, and go out and relieve the besieged train. He replied that he could go out and take them away in safety, but he dared not; he dared not disobey counsel.

On Saturday, at twelve o'clock, we left Cedar City. About the middle of the afternoon, we met the four men who were sent out the night previous, returning in a wagon, Mathews and Tanner held a council with them apart, and when they left, Mathews told me the entire train had been cut off; and as it was still dangerous to travel the road, they had concluded it was better for us to pass the spot in the night. We continued on, without much conversation, and about dusk met Mr. Dame, (I did not know that he had left Cedar City,) and three other white men, coming from the scene of slaughter, in company with a band of some twenty Indian warriors. One of the men in company with Mr. Dame, was Mr. Haight, President of Cedar City. Mr. Dame said they had been out to see to the burying of the dead; but the dead were not buried. From what I heard, I believe the bodies were left lying naked upon the ground, having been stripped of their clothing by the Indians. These Indians had a two-horse wagon, [filled] with something I could not see, as blankets were carefully spread over the top. The wagon was driven by a white man, and beside him there were two or three Indians in it. Many of them had shawls, and bundles of women's clothes were tied to their saddles. They were also well supplied with guns or pistols, besides bows and arrows. The hindmost Indians were driving several head of the emigrants' cattle. Mr. Dame and Mr. Haight and their men, seemed to be on the best of terms with the Indians, and they were all in high spirits, as if they were mutually pleased with the accomplishment of the same desired object. They thronged around us, and greeted us with noisy cordiality. We did not learn much from them. They passed on, and we drove all night in silence, and at daylight camped, and were told we were three miles beyond the scene of the slaughter. We lay by here two or three hours to rest, and then drove all day,twenty miles, at night camping on the Santa Clara River, near the Chief Jackson's village.

Next morning, after driving a few miles, we stopped to water. Jackson and his band soon came to us; and in a few minutes pointed out Mr. Warn as an American. The Mormon boys denied it, but the Indians were dissatisfied, and appeared restive. The Chief came up and accused me of being an American, appeared mad, stepped round, shook his head, and pulled his bowstring. He then sent several men on our road ahead. Mr. Mathews advised us to leave there as quick as possible, as it was getting dangerous.

At Jackson's we engaged Mr. Hatch to go on to the Muddy as an interpreter. It was a fortunate circumstance for us that this Mr. Hatch arrived at our camp at the very moment that we were wishing for him most. Mr. Mathews told me he was an Indian missionary, and of great influence among them. He could do more with them than anybody else, and if he could not get me over the road, nobody could. Mr. Tanner had declared that he would not go on without Mr. Hatch, and pretended to be afraid of the dangers of the road.

Next morning, Mr. Hatch left us and went on to the Muddy. About a day's drive the other side of the Muddy, we met him returning in company with two young men, brothers Young, horse-thieves, who were escaping from justice in San Bernardino, having been assisted in getting away by those who had them in custody. Mr. Hatch stated, that when he reached the Muddy he found the Young boys, in company with an emigrant who had escaped the massacre. That on his arrival, there was not an Indian in sight, and that he had to give the whoop to call them from concealment. He said in continuation, without appearing to notice the discrepancy, that on his arrival he found the Indians hotly pursuing the three men, and that they jumped upon the emigrant and killed him before his eyes, before he could interfere to prevent it. He said he threw himself between the boys and Indians, and had great difficulty in saving them. The Indians were in a great excitement, as he said, but that as Mathews and Tanner were Mormons, they could pass without danger.

We arrived at the Muddy the day after we met Mr. Hatch and the Young boys. We found here 30 or 40 Indians, and the mail riders from Los Angeles, who had come in that morning. The Indians were very friendly, and shook hands with everybody. No expression of hostility to Americans was heard, but this was accounted for on the ground that this was a Mormon train.

At the Vegas, we found another band of Indians. The chief asked our interpreter whether our captain had brought him no word from Brigham Young, whether he was nearly ready to fight the Americans yet; adding, that he was ready, had got his arrows poisoned, &c. &c.

At the Cotton-woods, 15 miles from the Vegas, the chief, called Brigham Young, said he was afraid of the emigrant train behind, and wished to know if they would shoot.

On the 1st October, we arrived at San Bernardino, and I was advised by R. Mathews, who I learned, was a President or Elder in that place, not to associate with the damned apostates, that they were cut-throats of the worst character. If I wished, they would give me constant work at their mill in the mountains, and I must be careful not to talk too much of what I had seen.

[Whilst] in San Bernardino I heard many persons express gratification at the massacre. At the church services on Sunday, Capt. Hunt occupied the pulpit, and among other things, he said that the hand of the Lord was in it; [whether it was done by white or red skins], it was right! The [prophecies] concerning Missouri were being fulfilled, and they would all be accomplished.

Mr. Mathews said the work had just begun, and it should be carried on until Uncle Sam and all the boys that were left, should come to Zion and beg for bread.

I did not stay in San Bernardino, because it did not appear to be a free country, for I am an American, and like freedom of thought and speech.

Thus far the narrative of Mr. Powers.

On being asked, if he did not at any time express any feeling, in the company, at the wholesale massacre of his countrymen. He replied, it was not safe to express an opinion. The men he was with were unscrupulous, and would not have hesitated to kill him for any unguarded words. When the Indians passed by him, wearing the garments of American women, and seeming to exult in their crimes, his blood boiled, but he dared not speak; and after they were gone, he asked Matthews, with earnestness, why it had been done. Matthews replied, that he must not grieve or take on, for the women were all prostitutes, that their bodies had been examined by President Dame, and this ought to console him. Matthews rejoiced greatly at the massacre, and considered it the beginning of long delayed vengeance.

Mr. Tanner regretted it, and seemed to be deeply grieved.

It is supposed that one hundred and eighteen (118) persons were killed of whom fifty six (56) were men, and that fifteen (15) children were taken back to Cedar City of whom, not one was over six years old. It was reported, that but one Indian was killed.

Mr. P. M. Warn, of Bergen, Genesee county, New York; who was a fellow-traveler with Mr. Powers, on that fatal journey, corroborates the statements of Powers, so far as he was acquainted with the facts, and gives the following additional particulars, which did not come under the observation of Mr. Powers:

Mr. Warn states that there was a coolness between himself and Mr. Matthews, arising from the frankness with which he expressed his opinions, and in consequence of this, he was not treated with as much confidence as Mr. Powers.

Mr. Warn arrived at Salt Lake, via Independence, on the 7th of April last, and remained until the 26th, on which day he started for California, as a passenger in Matthews and Tanner's train. He states, that on his journey through the settlements, which was a week or ten days subsequent to the passage of the murdered train, he every where heard the same threats of vengeance against them, for their boisterousness and abuse of Mormons and Mormonism, as was reported, and these threats seemed to be made with the intention of preparing the mind to expect a calamity, and also when a calamity occurred, it should appear to fall upon transgressors, as a matter of retribution.

Mr. Warn says according to his memorandum, on the 5th of September we encamped at Corn Creek. Here I had conversation with the Indian agent, concerning the poisoning of the ox. He said that six Indians had died; that others were sick and would die. Upon one of them, the poison had worked out all over his breast, and he was dead next morning, as reported. Afterwards, I conversed with an Indian, said to be the war chief Ammon, who spoke good English. I inquired how many of his tribe had died from eating the poisoned animal. He replied not any but some were sick. He did not attribute the sickness to poison, nor did he give any reason for it. His manner, and that of all his people towards us, was not only friendly, but cordial; and he did not mention the train which had been doomed. Besides the Mormon train, there were camped at this place two or three emigrants trains, amounting to fifteen or eighteen wagons, with whom the Indians were as friendly as with ourselves. From Corn Creek, nothing of importance occurred more than is related by Mr. Powers, until we arrived at Cedar City. Here the four men, spoken of by Mr. Powers, (and among whom I recognized Mr. Dame,) arrived at our camp; they wished to get fresh animals, that they might go on that night to the besieged party. This was on Friday night, the night on which the slaughter was completed. They rested an hour or two, and took refreshments. In the conversation which ensured, one our party said, ["]be careful, and don't get shot, Mr. Haight.["] Mr. H. replied, ["]we shall have no shooting;["] emphasizing the we, and throwing up his head, as if he meant to imply that the shooting would be all over before he arrived. They left us in good spirits.

One reason that may be assigned for the massacre of this train, is, that it was known to be in possession of considerable valuable property, and this fact excited the cupidity of the Mormons. It was said, they had over 400 head of stock, besides mules, &c. They were well supplied with arms and ammunition, an element of gain which enters largely into all Mormon calculations. The train was composed of families who all seemed to be in good circumstances, and as they were moving to California, their outfit indicated that they might be in possession of considerable funds. The men were very free in speaking of the Mormons; their conduct was said to have been reckless, and they would commit little acts of annoyance for the purpose of provoking the saints. Feeling perfectly safe in their arms and numbers, they seemed to set at defiance all the powers that could be brought against them. And they were not permitted to feel the dangers that surrounded them, until they were cut off from all hope of relief.

Mr. Warn states, in speaking of the emigrant who escaped and was killed at the Muddy, that at Painter Creek, some six or seven miles on the other side of the place of massacre, a Mormon told him that one of the little girls who was taken back, and who is about six years old, said that she saw her mother killed by an arrow, and that her father had escaped to California. This was before Hatch joined the train. The matter of the escaped was talked over by the Mormon captains, and Mathews made the remark, ["]If the man comes into our train, he shall not be received!["]



The Duty of the Government.

It may be superfluous in us, on reviewing the facts detailed elsewhere, to say anything to urge the Federal Government at Washington to take prompt measures to investigate the last sanguinary tragedy on the Salt Lake route to California. The facts set forth, that one hundred and eighteen Americans, men, women, and children, have been cruelly butchered on the nation’s highway, by a band of ruthless savages, are in themselves sufficiently startling and appalling, to arouse the energies of the most dormant. From time to time, outrages have been perpetrated by the Indians on passing emigrants, of which no notice have been taken by the authorities. It would seem as if those who set out to make their homes in this State, are deemed to have left behind them all claim on the Government for protection; and that they are doomed to death, if unable to defend themselves against the sudden attack of an ambushed enemy, or unfortunate in contending against the unknown and unforeseen dangers of the route....

(under construction)




Public Meeting.

A mass meeting of the citizens of Los Angeles, convened at the Pavillion, on the Plaza, October 12th, 1857, to investigate the facts in the recent massacre, on the Salt Lake road, of more than one hundred Americans....

Committee reported the following preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted:

Whereas, After a careful examination into all the circumstances connected with the late horrible massacre in Utah Territory, we firmly believe the atrocious act was perpetrated by the Mormons, and their allies the Indians; and

Whereas, We perceive the rapidly gathering cloud of troubles caused by a long, undisturbed, [systemized] course of thefts, robberies, and murders, promoted and sanctioned by their leader, and head prophet, Brigham Young, together with the Elders and followers of the Mormon Church, upon American citizens, who necessity has compelled to pass through their Territory. Aware of their bitter hostility to our republican government, and all its Institutions; their rejection, insult, oppression, and in some cases murder, of the Federal officers, sent by the President to enforce the laws of the United States; believing that the late massacre in cold blood of one hundred and eighteen persons, included in which number, were sixty women and children, is but the commencement of a series of such fiendish atrocities that the many emigrant trains, now on their way from the Western States to California, are liable to meet the same fate; that unless speedy measures are taken by the Government of the United States, the tide of emigration by this route will be entirely stopped.

Therefore, be it resolved, That we respectfully petition the President of the United States, to exert the authority vested in him by the Constitution; that prompt measures may be taken for the punishment of the authors of the recent appalling and wholesale butchery of innocent men, women and children.

Resolved, That as there are at the present time, a large community of Mormons residing in the adjoining county of San Bernardino, many of whom are living in open violation of one the most important and scared laws of our State.

Be it Resolved, That we hereby respectfully request the Chief Executive of this State, to enforce its laws upon the people.

Resolved, That we hold ourselves ready at all times to respond to the call of the proper authority, to assist, if necessary, in enforcing obedience to the laws...

(under construction)




Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Sat., October 17, 1857.                            No. 179.



The  Immigrant  Massacre.

Angels, October 14, 1857.    
EDITORS ALTA: This morning, while conversing with some immigrants, who have lately arrived via the Plains from Arkansas, and are living within a few miles of this place, I related to them the circumstances of the massacre. They immediately informed me that they knew who the parties were. They stated that there were three, and perhaps four, companies from Arkansas, while the balance of the company was made up of Missourians, who fell in with them; of these latter, they knew nothing, but the Arkansas companies, consisted of Faziers, Camerons and the two Dunlaps, and perhaps Bakers. They were from the counties of Marion, [Carrol] and Johnson. They say when they saw them, they were encamped six miles from Salt Lake City, that they had been there for some time, and that they intended to stay there until the weather got cool enough for them to come by the South Pass, expecting to make a stay of eight weeks all together. Baker had not arrived there when they left, but as they can learn nothing from him or his company, they concluded that he had fallen in and decided to come into California with these companies. The two Dunlaps had each nine children, some of them well grown. If these are the persons who were slaughtered, who can be so blind as not to see that the hands of Mormons are stained with this blood. How could so large a company remain among them for two months and they not learn one name? and why would the Indians kill every being, except those that were too young to communicate anything to their friends, or hardly tell a name, or tell who were the murderers of their parents, and brothers and sisters; or even discriminate between white men and Indians? Why all this concealment? and in the very face of it the Indians tell what they have done and sell all their spoils to the whites. It will do to lay this blood upon them, but I feel certain that investigation will throw it off.   P.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Sun., October 18, 1857.                            No. 180.



Mormon  and  Indian  Alliance.

Yesterday, we had an interview with a gentleman from Carson Valley who, from intimacy with Mormon families, has some knowledge of their future designs and plans of iperation. If his conclusions be correct, not only the settlers east of the mountains, but even the people of this State will have reason to deprecate the exasperation of those American Bedouins. He says that the Mormons of Carson Valley and San Bernardino have sold their cattle and property for nearly nothing, and, at the bidding of their chief, have repaired to Salt Lake with the secret design of re-organizing, arming, equiping, returning murdering and plundering their Gentile neighbors. The declare that, for every saint slain by the United States troops, ten Gentile women shall make atonement; that they will first exterminate the troops from the east, then come west, and, in predatory bands, allied with Indians, they will ravage the border, rob, plunder and murder, until they shall have replentished the Lord's treasury, and revenged insults put upon his chosen people.

Of their ability to execute this threat, we have but little doubt. At the order of their leader and prophet, they can muster 15,000 men armed with the most effective instruments of destruction. They have many thousands of the finest horses, trained to camp-service; they have a foundry where cannon and shells are cast; a powder mill and a factory, where revolving rifles and pistols are manufactured; equal to those made at Hartford. They have every munition of war and necessary provision and means of transportation, within themselves, and even the women and children are instructed in the use of arms. Add to this their geographical position. To reach Salt Lake, from the east, it is necessary to pass through a canyon of twenty-five miles, under hills so steep and rocky that a dozen men could hurl down an avalanche of stones on an approaching caravan: and even in the event of several thousand troops reaching the valley, the beseiged, with their herds, would take to the mountains, and, reinforced by their savage allies, would, in turn, besiege their besiegers, until the invaders had starved out.

They have, it is said, 20,000 Indian allies, whom they are ready to furnish with arms and horses on an emergency. These Indians are partially instructed in the Mormon religion -- enough to make them superstitious in regard to the God of a superior race, yet modifying none of their ferocity. With allies like these and fighting for their homes, and, according to the belief of the ignorant, under the direct supervision of the God of Battles, and from the ramparts with which nature has surrounded them, it is easy to conceive what would be the fate of a few thousand troops, who travelled a thousand miles to fight their own countrymen, brave as themselves, as well armed, better used to field life, and stimulated by their love of home and family, and assured of victory by the revelations of their prophets. -- Sac. Age.



THE WESTERN STANDARD. -- What has become of our Mormon cotemporary? It has not been published for several weeks. Has Brigham considered it good policy for it to be stopped during these exciting times, or are the gentiles of the Pacific coast given over to destruction?


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Tues., October 20, 1857.                            No. 182.



For  the  East.

On account of the accident which happened to the Golden Gate, and her return, our news by this steamer is but little more than a week later than that sent by the Golden Age. By that steamer, we dispatched to the Eastern States copies of the extra Alta California, containing the details of the terrible massacre of over one hundred emigrants on their way from Arkansas and Missouri, by Salt Lake City, to California. This news has excited a good deal of melancholy interest among the people of California, and especially those wjo are expecting friends by way of the Plains from the East. Is there any protection to be afforded travelers passing through our own territory by the General Government? With our enlarged possessions, with the increased travel during a few years past, with the fact that a large portion of emigrants on their way to this State, are required to pass through and among tribes of predatary and lawless savages, the idea that our military force should be kept at its present standard is ridiculous, and much more absutd, that any considerable portion of it should be kept out of active service. It is high time the General Government adopted some plan to save our citizens from massacre, while peacefully seeking the shores of the Pacific. A very decided belief prevails here that the Mormons have been the instigators of this fould deed. We informed our Eastern readers, by the last mail, that the "Saints" had all, by order of Brigham Young, left Carson Valley, for Salt Lake. It is said that a similar order has been sent to San Bernardino, and that the Mormons there are also preparing to take up their line of march for the wilderness of Zion. The departure from Carson Valley had a decided air of permanency about it, the brethren selling off their possessions, paying their debts, and leaving apparently as if never to return, doubtless shaking the gentile dust from off their feet. The Mormon organ in this city, the Western Standard, established here some two years since, by order of Brigham Young, has been suspended, probably by the same authority, and everything connected with Mormondom looks as though there were to be a general exodus from this State to Salt Lake City. We are very strongly of the opinion here, that the Mormons intend to show fight, in case a decided attempt is made to enforce the United States laws in Utah, and that on account of the determined character of the people, the fact of their being well provided with arms and ammunition, and the peculiar local advantages for the prosecution of a war of offence, or defence it will require more than Col. Johnston and twenty-five hundred men to whip them into submission. Their priests and preachers are fanning into a flame their religious fanaticism, uttering the most terrible threats against our government, and breathing defiance to its officers. In case of difficulty, there could easily be organized three or four regiments in California, and we hope the Government will, at this stage of affairs, take this matter into consideration.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Wed., October 21, 1857.                            No. 183.



Interesting  from  Salt  Lake.

The same [Sacramento Union] article says that reports brought by these families, tend strongly to corroborate the suspicion already existing against the Mormons, as the instigators, if not the perpetrators, of the recent wholesale massacre of immigrants at Santa Clara Canyon. Mr. Pierce, who came by way of Salt Lake, and joined the other two families at the Sink of the Humboldt, reports some five hundred Indians encamped near Salt Lake, who, as he learned from the Mormons, were retained as allies to operate against the troops sent out by the Government. He was also assured that these Indians had been instructed not to molest the immigration this year, as preparations were not sufficiently complete to enable the Mormons to make a stand against the United States. In the city itself, large crowds of Mormons were nightly practicing military drill, and there was every evidence of energetic preparations for some great event. Before his family left Salt Lake, vague declarations of a threatening character were made, to the effect that, next year, "the overland emigrants must look out;" and it was even intimated that the last trains this year might be destroyed. From the Mormon train which recently left Carson Valley, and which these families met on the way, similar statements were vaguely communicated, one Mormon woman even going so far as to congratulate an old lady in one of these families upon her safe arrival so near her destination, and assuring her that "the last trains of this year would not get through so well, for they were to be cut off." We give these statements as we received them from members of these families, and, admitting their correctness, which we have no reason to doubt, they certainly go far to confirm a terrible suspicion.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, October 24, 1857.                         No. 24.



More Outrages on the Plains!!

The surprise and excitement, following the receipt of the intelligence of the late horrible massacre on the Plains, had not abated when, when we find ourselves called on to record another attack on peaceable citizens traveling along the common highway.

It was known that another train was following that which has been so ruthlessly assassinated, and but a few days march behind it, and great fear was entertained for its safety. This alarm has been but too well founded as the following detail of their sufferings will exhibit. No one who reads the statement given below by Mr. Honea, can for a moment doubt the complicity of the Mormon leaders in these scenes of crime and outrage. The immense sums paid to the interpreters, and their refusal to fulfill the terms of their contracts not to say, what is very plainly charged against them by our informant that they conspired with the Indians to commit the depredations and outrages complained of would alone convict them of a participation in these murderous assaults. What course the Government will take in the matter we cannot say, but we think another year will not roll round without a sufficient force being stationed along the road to protect the people in their journey. This we think the Government owes to its citizens, whether or not it will inflict punishment on these wrongdoers

From the statements made regarding the preaching of the Mormon Prophet, and the sentiments of the people, there can be no doubt but a deep rooted animosity exists amongst them against the people and Government of the United States. It will be seen that the Mormon troops had actually moved out to engage and drive back the men under the command of Col. Johnson, who had succeeded Gen. Harney in command of the Utah expedition. What the result of this movement has been, a short time will tell; but the first shot fired against that band of Uncle Sam’s boys, will be the signal for lighting the torch of a long and sanguinary war, which will not be quenched till Mormonism is exterminated from the soil of the United States.

We commend the following statement to the careful perusal of our readers. We have full confidence in the candor and veracity of the gentleman who furnishes the information. He is well known to a large number of our most respectable citizens, who were formerly residents of Franklin county, in the State of Arkansas, from which he has just emigrated:

S. B. Honea, of Franklin County, State of Arkansas [recently arrived at Los Angeles], left home on the 9th of May, 1857, for California, in company with the Crook & Collins company, and afterwards fell in with the Williamson company, from Pope county. With the exception of an attack by the Rappaho Indians, on the Arkansas river, on the 20th of June, on the company of Captain Henry of Texas, who lost 151 head of cattle, nothing of interest occurred on the journey, nor did they perceive any symptoms of opposition or [of] armed bands, till they [came to] Fort Bridger, in Utah Territory. Here they saw a large quantity of provisions stored, a considerable number of Indians encamped all around the fort, and heard the people generally speaking of making preparations to go out and meet General Harney. At Fort Bridger, he was told by a merchant that at Fort Supply over 400 Indians were encamped, awaiting orders to attack the U. S. troops. About thirty miles from Fort Bridger, he met three companies of men, generally mounted, and all [were] well armed, having an abundance of baggage, their wagons being numbered in messes....

[Here he] had a conversation with one of the Mormon soldiers, an Englishman, who, [camped] with [our] company, and over the camp fire became communicative. He referred in bitter terms to the treatment the Mormons had received in Illinois and Missouri, reflected on the unjustness and tyranny of the people of the United States, and said that the time was come to get even. He said they were on their way to meet Gen. Harney, to see what he was coming for: "If he was comicg peaceably, we will let him come, but if not, we will drive him back, were the words used. Another Mormon, named [Killion], an old man, who lives about seven miles [from] Salt Lake city, spoke bitterly against the United States, denounced Judge Drummond, and all the Federal officers, and rejoiced that the time had come when the saints would be avenged on their enemies -- that men were found who could face the enemy, and that Harney, with his 2,500 men, never would enter Salt Lake city. He also stated that Governor Brigham Young had ordered the people to prepare for war; that they should not sell emigrants anything; that they must lay up provisions; that the men and women must not dress up in store clothes any more, but that all must be saved to forward the cause of the church against the common enemy -- that the men must be content with buckskin instead of broadcloth, and have plenty of guns and ammunition....

On the 17th of August [Mr. Honea] passed through the city of Salt Lake. Remained only three or four hours. Had a conversation with a merchant, a Gentile, who stated that on the previous Sunday Brigham Young had declared in the Temple [sic - Tabernacle?], that henceforth Utah was a separate and independent Territory, and owed no obedience or allegiance to any form or laws, but those of their own enactment, and called upon the people to stand together, and support him in maintaining the cause of God and the church. Was told that the house of Gilbert & Garrison, had orders from Brigham to pack up and leave before the 1st of November....

Nothing occurred worthy of not, till we arrived at Corn Creek. Here had a conversation with a man who represented himself as the Indian agent. He told us that a train had passed a short time before us, who had poisoned an ox, and that they had been attacked by the Indians. He spoke in abusive terms of the men of that train, for having acted in an improper manner.

One of our company, named Joseph Lane, lost three oxen, which had been run off from him. He offered a reward to the Indians to bring them back, which they said they could not do, as they knew nothing of them, but three white men came into camp and offered to bring them back for $15, to which he agreed. They brought two of them and claimed the money, which was paid them. They then said the Indians had shot an arrow into the other, but that they would go and find him for $10, which was agreed to, and they then brought the missing animal into camp, which had no appearance of having been wounded. Here [traded off] a horse with an Indian, the agent acting as interpreter. From this we proceeded to Beaver, passing Capt. Turners train, of Missouri, about seven miles north of Beaver. Here we were informed that Capt. Bakers train, of Carroll county Arkansas, had been murdered, and that it would not be safe for us to proceed any further....

We camped that evening within half a mile of Beaver, and were informed that the Indians intended to attack Captain Turner that night. The Mormons proposed that five of their men would go back with five of our men, in order to assist Turners train, but in reality to prevent us from firing on the Indians in their attack. Before we got there, firing had commenced, the Indians having begun to rifle the camp; one Indian was wounded. Turner's train was harnessed up to join our train, the Indians keeping up a fire on them, wounding some of the cattle, but doing no other injury. The interpreters prevented the men of the train from firing on the Indians, saying that if they injured an Indian we would all be killed. From this we became more apprehensive of the interpreters than of the Indians, feeling that we were completely in the power of an unscrupulous enemy....

Next morning, the Indians sent down an order by the Bishop of Beaver, demanding cattle from us. Whilst in consultation on this demand, intelligence was received that five of the Corn Creek Indians had come down, and the Bishop went off with the Indians, without waiting for our answer. Here it was considered necessary to remain some time, as the grass was good, and our men went up to the Bishop to obtain permission to stop, and also to have smith-work done in town....

At this place, we were joined by Turner’s train. Whilst Turner, and Duke, our captain, were standing in the street, they were fired on by the Indians, and Captain Turner was shot through the hip, and Capt. [Duke] was grazed by two or three bullets. Mr. Collins was standing in front of the blacksmith shop, and went in and begged protection, when he was pushed out of the house and the Indians shot him, breaking his arm, shattering the bone very loudly. A Mormon then came galloping to our camp, and told us to remain by the wagons. Supposing that something was wrong, four of our men started to the town to see what had happened, when we saw Turner, Dukes, and Collins coming to us in a circuitous route, who called to us to return, as they had been attacked by the Indians and were badly wounded. We then made preparations for a fight, made a corral of the wagons, and prepared our arms, but no fight took place.

This evening, an Indian chief, named Ammon came to our camp, in company with the Bishop, and said he had just come from Salt Lake city -- that all was peace, and demanded cattle. We gave him six head of cattle. Here Mr. Honea had to give up the horse for which [he] had traded with an Indian, because, it was said, the Indians knew the horse and were angry at seeing him in possession of an American.

Here heard a Mormon named Hooper say, that he was glad the train had been killed, for they carried poison with them, and had only got their just reward.

Next morning left Beaver. We now came to the conclusion that it would be better to hire interpreters, and we accordingly hired three Mormons, named David Carter, Nephi Johnson, and Shirts, who agreed to come with us to the divide between the Santa Clara and the Rio Virgin. Before we got to the divide, two of them turned back[,] Johnson came on, one of them, Shirts, stealing a horse. President Dame had been paid in advance for their services....

Dame advised us not to pass where the other train had been massacred, but to take a left-hand trail, which we finally did, having first proposed to go and [bury] our deceased countrymen; but the interpreters objected, saying that the Indians would serve us the same way. Here we met the two horse thieves, the brothers Young, who stated that the Indians were very troublesome on the Muddy, and advised us to hire additional interpreters, especially Hatch. We hired Hatch and four others, paying them $500 in advance. Their contract was, to come with us to the Cottonwood Springs....

While they were with us they made us give beeves to the Indians on the Santa Clara, and advised us not to swear before the Indians, as they would know us to be Americans, and probably kill us.

On passing down the Rio Virgin we had to give more beeves to the Indians, who stole a horse from one of the company. We lost several head of cattle. Hamblin, the interpreter, sent Indians to search for them, who drove them back to Hamblin's house. Other cattle strayed off and were immediately killed by the Indians. On the Virgin, Mr. Samuel Weeks lost $302.50 from his wagon. A thorough search was made in the train, but it could not be found. The opinion was, that the interpreters had stolen it, as most of the company knew of the money being there. A man named Lovett [sic - Leavitt?] joined us here, who had no ostensible reason for coming to us. He lived with Hamblin, and it was the opinion of the company afterward that the plan was concocted here between Hamblin and Hatch for our robbery.

On leaving the Virgin, we were advised by the interpreters to make up a present of tents, blankets, &c, and [send it] to the Indians at the Muddy. This was done, to the amount of six or seven tents and several bundles of blankets, and a considerable amount of clothing. The interpreters took charge of the goods and left the same night in advance, for the Muddy.

Next night, we encamped about mid-way between the Virgin and the Muddy, where two of the interpreters came back to us, saying that the Indians were peaceable, being well pleased with the presents sent them. Hamblin observed that there was one captain, with 100 men, not there, and that there was nothing to fear, except from him, as he did not know where he was.

Next day we reached the Muddy. The interpreters told us the Indians wanted ten beeves. We gave them six, and thought they were well satisfied. Here we made particular observation to see whether any of the Indians had any of the tents or clothing sent them, but could not see any; we concluded that the interpreters kept them for themselves. We stayed here three or four hours, and then started for the Desert, leaving two of the interpreters, and Lovett with their own wagons, on the Muddy....

Proceeded about eight or ten miles along the canyon. The cattle were in advance of our wagons about half a mile. The cattle were stopped to enable the wagons to come up. While waiting, observed Hamblin on the top of a hill, apparently looking for Indians. He came down from the hill, and by this time the wagons had joined the advance party, and the train moved on. Before this, however, Hamblin had a conversation with a young Indian who accompanied us from the Muddy, and who pointed out to him where the Indians were located. When we started on, the Indian asked for water; there was none in any of the vessels, and he then ran in advance of the cattle and gave a whoop. The yelling then became general along the hills, where previously we could not perceive a single Indian. At this time three of the four interpreters who remained with us were in the rear of the train. The other advised the captains to fall back and leave the cattle and guard the wagons with the women and children. This was done, when a large body of Indians, over two hundred, made a descent on the cattle, and run them off to the number of 326 head, and five horses. Sime of the party prepared to fire on the Indains, but the interpreter[s] prevented them, saying we would all be killed. He then rode among the Indians, and soon returned, saying that they had sent word, if we wanted to fight to come on. He was requested to go again to the Indians, when he asked to exchange and old gun for a valuable navy revolver. It was given him[; then he] started off, in company with some of the train, [and] on the condition that if danger threatened, he would fire the pistol, which would be the signal for them to return to the wagons. He fired the pistol; all the interpreters left the train, and were not [again seen].

We stayed here but a short time, and proceeded on our way to the Vegas, which we reached without molestation. The Indians were peaceable, and the interpreters not being with us, we had to give them only one animal.

From this we came to Cottonwood Springs, about 275 miles from San Bernardino. Here the Indians were also perfectly peaceable. The remaining cattle being almost wornout, it was resolved to remain here to recruit. Nine of the company started off on foot, and after enduring almost incredible sufferings from the want of food and water, reached San Bernardino almost exhausted.

It should be added that Hamblin, the interpreter, stated on being hired, that if there was to be any fighting the interpreters should take no part in it; that they were friendly with the Indians who were Mormons.

The train, at the time of the attack, consisted of 125 persons, forty-four of whom were men, bearing arms. They had 440 cattle, 130 work oxen, and forty-five mules and horses, and twenty-three wagons.

The party left at Cottonwood Springs, intend to remain until their animals are recruited, as the grass was good; and there being no Mormons, the Indians peaceable and friendly. They will probable arrive at San Bernardino within a week or ten days. The distance is 275 miles....


The train which has been so cruelly massacred, was under the charge of Captain Baker, familiarly known as Uncle Jack, from Carroll county Arkansas. Silas Edwards and William Baker, son of the captain, are also known to have been in the train. At Cedar City, Mr. Honea saw President Haight riding a large bay horse which he recognized as having belonged to Mr. Silas Edwards. Was informed by Hatch, that young Baker had an opportunity of escaping, went a short distance but returned; was afterwards wounded in the arm; again escaped from the massacre, and had proceeded about ten miles this side the Muddy, when he met the Youngs who had escaped from San Bernardino. He was advised to return to the Muddy, which he did, when he was met by Hatch and the Indians, and by them cruelly murdered....

Mr. Honea says that in coming into San Bernardino, about fifteen miles the other side of the sink of the Mohave river, he met the mail wagon, for Salt Lake city, having a large quantity of pistols and ammunition. The driver wished to purchase arms from the party, but they refused to sell....

To give an idea of the fraud and extortion practised by the Mormons on emigrants, Mr. Honea states that their company paid to interpreters, six in all, the enormous sum of $1815. The duty performed by these guides and interpreters, was, to conduct the company from Cedar City to Cottonwood Springs, a distance of not over 300 miles. Yet this contract was not fulfilled, although payment was made in advance....



Public Meeting.

(under construction)




Note: Additional transcription pending -- courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher. This article was partly reprinted in the Alta California of Oct. 27, 1857. -- Stephen B. Honea was born in Alabama and was Sheriff of Franklin County, Arkansas in 1854-1856. He went west in 1857.


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Tues., October 27, 1857.                            No. 189.



LATER  FROM  THE  SOUTH:
______

The Massacre at Mountain Canyon Confirmed --
More Indian Outrages, &c.

By the arrival of the steamer Senator, we have received through Wells Fargo & Co., the San Diego Herald of October 17th, and files of the Los Angeles Star to the 24th inst.

THE MOUNTAIN CANYON MASSACRE. -- The report of the late terrible massacre of the emigrants in southern Utah, is fully confirmed.

We invite particular attention to our Los Angeles letter, which appears below. It gives minute details of the dreadful massacre at the Mountain Canyon, and also subsequent outrages on emigrants, together with other matters of general interest.

Our San Diego exchanges contain nothing of importance.



OUR  LOS  ANGELES  CORRESPONDENCE.
_____

Los Angeles, October 24, 1857.    
The massacre of more than a hundred American citizens by Mormon traitors and Indians, has created a great excitement among all classes in our community, and we hope that the tocsin is now sounded that shall rouse the nation and compel the government to protect our countrymen from the additional danger which foreign traitors throw around them, in passing over the national territories. For long years outrage upon outrage has been committed and representations made imploring aid in that inhospitable region where nature herself is so repulsive as almost to forbid travel, but their calls have been unheeded.

Our whole community has been deeply moved. Many of them are waiting and wishing for a call, to go and abate the evils which arrest the weary traveler and consign him to an unknown and nameless grave, midway to his destination. Two large public meetings were held in this city last week, under the circus pavilion, at which speeches were made by several who had been at Salt Lake, and resolutions were passed, which, I believe, express the sentiments of everybody here but Mormons. There is a sentiment of extermination, living and intense, growing in the minds of all true Americans, against the traitors who have planted themselves in our territory, and who have instigated the savages of the desert to slaughter and rapine. Will the government make any effort to redeem its character for pusillanimity, in so long delaying to correct those monstrous evils? does there need hecatombs more of victims, before anything is done? What further outrage and insult is needed to prove to our rulers that there is a band of armed traitors in our midst who are making indiscriminate war upon men, women and children, simply because they are Americans, who are more dangerous because they are blinded by fanaticism, and who are instigating the savages to slay all who are not saints? A terrible example seems necessary to prove to them the power of those they are thus taught to slaughter-an example so fearful that it shall be remembered in all their villages, and shall make them tremble with awe when they hear the American name.

The following statements (which I have already given to our public both in English and Spanish) I took down from the lips of the gentlemen named. The manner of these gentlemen was truthful and straightforward, and the utmost confidence is placed in their statements, which have been duly authenticated and forwarded by mail to Washington. They arrived in town on the 10th instant. It will be seen that they were not permitted to see anything of the massacre -- that they were detained one day near Parowan, that they might not arrive at the time of the massacre, and that they drove all night that the scene of the massacre might not be examined. Notwithstanding these precautions, it can scarcely fail to convince the unprejudiced reader that all these men saw and heard, goes to establish the complicity of the Mormons with the Indians in the wholesale butcheries reported -- that if these Saints were not actually engaged in the slaughter, they must have stood pitilessly by, and encouraged the Indians, whose vindictive character they have so moulded as to make it unsafe for any American to travel in that region unless he be under their protection.

Mr. George Powers, of Little Rock, left Arkansas, and with his train, arrived at Salt Lake in August. He says:

(see original George Powers statement in Los Angeles paper)

Mr. P. M. Warn, of Bergen, Genesse county, New York, who was a fellow-traveler with Mr. Powers on that fatal journey, corroborates the statements of Powers, so far as he was acquainted with the facts, and gives the following additional particulars, which did not come under the observation of Mr. Powers:

(see original P. M. Warn statement in Los Angeles paper)


The following statement is made to me by Mr. Henry Mogridge, with the request that I would give it publicity. He is a young man, and was once in high favor with the powers at Salt Lake. He says if called upon, he will make oath to the truth of his charges. He says: --

(see original Henry Mogridge statement in Los Angeles paper)


Mr. Warn states that, two days before arriving at San Bernardino, a man named Bill Hyde, whom he learned was a noted Danite, and who is badly reported of in this town, joined the train, having come through with the mail. This Hyde reported that he went and saw the bodies lying scattered about upon the ground, most of them stripped naked -- only a few of them being partially clothed. Dame and Haight, he said, staid there to bury the dead, but the bodies were so much decayed they could not endure the stench, and after throwing a few into a hole and covering them lightly with sage, the two Presidents departed. Decomposition must have been very rapid, to have produced so offensive results, the morning after the massacre!

Hyde also related to his Mormon brethren, that on arriving at the Santa Clara, where formerly there was a Mormon settlement, and is now occupied by the Chief Jackson, he saw in the hands of that chief, a little book, or journal, of one of the emigrants, in which was written the name, "Wm. B. Jones, Caldwell county, Missouri." He offered to purchase it, but the chief refused to part with it. This is the first intimation we have that will in any manner serve to identify the train. Not a word, nor a sign, except this, has been given, which will rescue from oblivion the name or residence of those hundred and eighteen travelers, and the only monument left of them is their bones whitening upon the desert.

How were these deaths compassed? and who did it? It is charged upon the Indians, by Mormons. But what Indians? These two gentlemen have related all they saw along the whole route. Except the band of twenty, they met returning from the massacre, in company with nearly as many more white men, they say distinctly that they saw no Indians, going or coming; and at the various villages, from Corn Creek to the Muddy, they saw no suspicious movements among them -- no preparations for attack -- no rejoicing -- no trophies of victory, except those already named, in possession of Haight and Dame's party. Those who were dressed as Indians in that party all talk English, and were on terms of equality with the Presidents. Is there any significance in this?

Since the above was written, the statement of Mr. Honea, concerning the outrages upon the last train heard of, has been made, and we have the following item which seems to identify the massacred train:
"The train which has been so cruelly massacred, was under the charge of Captain Baker, familiarly known as 'Uncle Jack,' from Carroll county, Arkansas -- Silas Edwards and William Baker, son of the captain, are also known to have been in the train. At Cedar City, Mr. Honea saw President Haight riding a large bay horse which he recognized as having belonged to Mr. Silas Edwards. Was informed by Hatch, that young Baker had an opportunity of escaping, went a short distance but returned; was afterwards wounded in the arm; again escaped from the massacre, and had proceeded about ten miles this side of the Muddy, when he met the Youngs who had escaped from San Bernadino. He was advised to return to the Muddy, which he did, when he was met by Hatch and the Indians, and by them cruelly murdered."

ANOTHER EMIGRANT TRAIN ROBBED ON THE SALT LAKE ROAD.

On the 17th inst., another of the back trains of emigrants was heard from. Considerable anxiety has been manifested at their non-arrival. It was said that the foremost ones would wait for those in the rear, and thus form one company. It was also felt that the declarations of Mathews and Hunt, that "the work of vengeance was at last begun," were significant of death to more than those who fell at Mountain Meadow. The intelligence we here have was brought by nine men who arrived on the 17th from their train. They state that, at Cedar City, the emigrants deemed it advisable for their safety to employ Mormon guides to conduct them through to California. After much trouble, they hired eight guides, paying them in advance $1815. In addition, they also hired an Indian. The guides and this Indian were on the most familiar terms during the journey. On their arrival at the Muddy, there was no Indian in sight. The savage they had hired here gave a long whoop, which seemed to be a signal agreed upon, when the enemies of Americans rushed out from concealment, to the number of two or three hundred, and attacked the stock of the emigrants, who drew their weapons to defend their property. On seeing this, the guides said to them: "If you fire a gun we will leave you instantly." Upon this they desisted, believing their guides were about to interfere in their behalf.

The enemy, who is reported to have been dressed and painted like bad looking Indians, succeeded in driving of 326 head of cattle and 5 horses. The guides, except the veritable Hatch, already spoken of by Powers and Warn, followed the Indians, having previously borrowed several revolvers from the emigrants. Hatch, who bids fair to become infamous, remained until the rest had gone out of sight, when, saying he would go after the cattle, he also left, and neither guide, revolvers, cattle nor Indians, were afterwards heard of.

When these men left the train it was nearly destitute of provisions, having been unable to purchase anything in the Mormon settlements. They state that the object of the thieves seemed to be to steal and plunder, as they made no attack upon the lives of the company. The men who brought this intelligence were ten days on the road, having left the Muddy on the 7th, and arrived at San Bernardino on the 17th instant. The last three days they travelled without provisions. They came in on foot -- the distance being 250 miles. Immediately on their arrival, two relief trains were sent out from San Bernardino, by the two parties there, each one vieing who should outdo the other in their charitable work.

A VOICE FROM SAN BERNARDINO.

The Independent Party of San Bernardino had a meeting the other day. This party is respectable as to numbers, and embraces more than one-third of the people; the majority being Saints. Their resolution is herewith annexed, and forms an interesting link in this veritable history:

FORT REGULATOR,    
San Bernardino, Oct. 17, 1857.    
Whereas, the officers of this county are all Mormons, or their firm supporters; and they, the Mormons, are the sworn enemies to our government; and the officers and sureties are irresponsible men; and the most of them are preparing to leave for Great Salt Lake City, Utah Territory; we therefore deem it unsafe to trust them with the public revenue; and in consideration of the foregoing, it was unanimously

Resolved, That we, the independent citizens of San Bernardino County, California, will not pay taxes or revenue to any person now in office in this county, and that we will assist and defend each other, if any officer in this county should proceed to enforce payment by virtue of his office.

                   FREDERIC VAN LEUVAN, President.
                   CHARLES FERGUSON, Clerk.

Just while we were greatly interested in the report of these outrages, there arrived at San Pedro, a vessel from Australia, with over seventy converts, the fruits of the labors of a fellow named Wall, who is recognized by persons here as a Danite from Fillmore, and as they say, one of the biggest rascals alive. He came to town the night of the meeting and remained till morning, when he was waited upon by a committee (self constituted) who greeted him in such a decided manner, that he was glad to escape, declaring that he had too much regard for his own life to endanger it by remaining here. The deluded wretches he was conducting to Zion were all women and children but nineteen.

Our citizens at first proposed to re-convert this crowd and thus save them from some of the miseries to which they are about to subject themselves, but they are allowed to go on their mournful journey uninformed.

There are few local items of interest. Public attention has been much engrossed by these outrages, and almost every one of those particularly who have been on the Salt Lake road generally winds up with "Let Government call for volunteers -- I should like to take a turn at those fellows!" Were a call made, half of our population would respond, so bitter is their experience. The general opinion here with intelligent men who know the audacity of Brigham Young, is that the small force which are advancing upon Utah, will all be cut off.

One more item. One of the speakers at our meeting said that the arms of Utah are a beehive, protected by a lion rampant, at whose feet is the American eagle, couchant, and badly plucked.

There is a good deal of dissatisfaction among our farmers, at the negligence of the Agent of Agricultural Fair, Mr. Ferguson. He came here, spent considerable time in searching for a boarding house, looked at two or three vineyards, and left. The corn and tobacco planters, at the Monte, were not pleased at this neglect. Three cornfields, two fields of tobacco, and one patch of immense onions would have been offered for premiums. I send you a specimen of the tobacco raised by Mr. Marshall, and which was prepared for the Fair. I eschew tobacco, but it seems to me there is a very agreeable aroma to this. You, perhaps are a judge of the weed. If so, give us a judgement.

On the 17th inst., it was reported in town that the San Bernardino people are purchasing large quantities of powder of our merchants, to be sent to Salt Lake. This report, taken in connection with others, that arms and powder had been recently forwarded to Salt Lake, via San Diego, and also that five hundred destination shows that the Mormons are making good use of their time, in preparing to meet Uncle Sam's forces. * * *

I nearly omitted to tell you that I am informed by a person who saw the document, that Capt. Hunt, of San Bernardino, has written by this steamer to the Governor, for rifles and ammunition to suppress insurrection in that county, and also to fight Indians! This is all pretence. All the files and ammunition they receive are instantly forwarded to Salt Lake, where the majority of these people are expected soon to depart.   YO MISMO.


Note: Juanita Books says that the George Powers report of the events surrounding the Mountain Meadows massacre was published in the Alta California, of "October 24, 1857," but the text of Powers' statement does not appear to have reached San Francisco until about that date, and the correct citation must be "October 27, 1857."


 



Vol. VIII.                            San Francisco, October 27, 1857.                            No. 17.



The  Federal  Government  and  the  Mormons.
___________

We devote considerable space this evening to the statements of persons who have recently crossed the Mormon territory, going to prove the complicity of these people in the later butchery of over one hundred immigrants, and their rebellion against the Government of the United States. These statements are convincing. Through their savage allies, the Mormons have slain in cold blood, and left unburied to rot, men and women peaceably pursuing their pathway across the territory of the United States. They have enrolled themselves in companies and taken up arms against the Government. They have audaciously declared their intention of cutting off all connection with the Government, and threaten the extermination of Federal troops sent out by the President to maintain and enforce the laws.

What effect this news will have at Washington, it is hard to forsee. But we much mistake the character of President Buchanan and his Cabinet, if it does not lead speedily to such action as will cause that arch traitor, Brigham Young, to repent his temerity. The blood of American citizens cries for vengeance from the barren sands of the Great Basin. The insulted dignity of the nation demands retribution from their infamous murderers. The insulted dignity Virtue, christianity and decency require that the vile brood of incestuous miscreants who have perpetuated this atrocity shall be broken up and dispersed. And the tide of ppular opinion, now rolling up from every end of the land, calls loudly upon the Government to let no longer delay ensue before commencing the good work.

And even should the news of the Mormon massacre upon the plains not suffice to incite to full activity the entire power of the Federal Officers, the position now taken by Brigham Young must do so. He has not waited to be attacked, but has commenced offensive warfare. The independence of Utah Territory has been declared, and the determination announced of adhering to no laws except such as the Mormons make themselves. This must bring them in speedy conflict with the United States -- and this insures their final extermination. For once the general detestation and hatred, pervading the whole country against the Mormons is given legal countenance and direction, a crusade will start against Utah which will crush out this beastly heresy forever. From this State [i. e. California] alone thousands of volunteers could be drawn, who would ask no better employment than the extermination of the Mormons at the call of the government. A war against this people will not be like a common war, in which the people feel no particular individual enmity against their foes; the degrading doctrines of the Latter-Day Saints have arrayed against them the hatred of decent people throughout the world. The press has denounced and the pulpit has hurled its anathemas at them, until Christendom is stirred up against Brigham and his Apostles, and an opportunity is only wanting for this feeling to break out. Then will be seen the folly of those who prophecy that the Mormons will be able to hold out against the forces that will be brought against them for any length of time. If they were sustained by the moral sentiment of the people of the United States, they might do much. But with this sentiment bearing them down, they scarcely can survive the first shock.



Later from Southern California.
_______

The Massacre of Imigrants on the Plains --
Mormon Complicity.

By the steamer Senator, which arrived yesterday from ports on the Southern Coast, we have the files of Los Angeles papers to the 24th Oct. and from San Diego to 17th of Oct. The only information of importance is in relation to the Indian troubles on the plains. The news, published on the arrival of the last steamer, of the massacre of over 100 immigrants, is fully confirmed. The evidence establishing the complicity of the Mormons in this outrage, is now sufficient to banish all doubt on that subject. We refer our readers to the statements published below.

Indignation Meeting at Los Angeles.

We learn from the Los Angeles Star that a mass meeting of citizens was held in that city on the 12th October to investigate the facts in the recent massacre, on the Salt Lake road, of more than one hundred Americans. The meeting was organized by the election of Mr. George N. Whitman, chairman, and Mr. W. H. Peterson, secretary. The object of the meeting was stated by Mr. Charles Chapman.

Mr. W. A. Wallace then read the following statement of Mr. George Powers, of Little Rock, Arkansas, who had just arrived across the plains. Mr. Powers says, on his arrival, last August at Salt Lake:

TESTIMONY OF GEORGE POWERS AS TO THE MASSACRE
AND MORMON COMPLICITY.


(see Mr. Powers' original statement in Los Angeles paper)

...

TESTIMONY OF P. M. WARN ON THE SAME SUBJECT.

(see Mr. Warn' original statement in Los Angeles paper)

...
After hearing the reading if these statements, the meeting was addressed by Mr. Andrews, Messrs. Sparks, Margradge [sic - Mogridge?], Chapman and others. A Committee of four, consisting of Messrs. A. S. Sparks, W. A. Wallace, Dr. Andrews and W. W. Twich, were appointed to draft resolutions, and the meeting adjourned until the next day.

RESOLUTIONS OF THE MEETING.

On the 13th Oct. the meeting convened again, when the Convention reported the following preamble and resolutions, which were adopted, unanimously.

Whereas, After a careful examination into all the circumstances connected with the late horrible massacre in Utah Territory, we firmly believe the atrocious act was perpetrated by the Mormons, and their allies, the Indians; and

Whereas, we perceive the rapidly gathering clouds of trouble, caused by a long, undisturbed, systemized course of thefts, robberies and murders, promoted and sanctioned by their leader and head prophet, Brigham Young, together with the Elders and followers of the Mormon Church, upon American citizens, whom necessity has compelled to pass through their Territory; aware of their bitter hostility to our republican government, and all its institutions; their rejection, insult, oppression, and in some cases murder, of the Federal officers, sent by the President to enforce the laws of the United States; believing that the late massacre in cold blood of one hundred and eighteen persons, included in which number, were sixty women and children, is but the commencement of a series of such fiendish atrocities, that the many emigrant trains, now on their way from the Western States to California, are liable to meet the same fate; that unless speedy measures are taken by the Government of the United States, the tide of emigration by this route will be entirely stopped.

Therefore, be it Resolved, That we respectfully petition the President of the United States to exert the authority vested in him by the Constitution, that prompt measures may be taken for the punishment of the authors of the recent appalling and wholesale butchery of innocent men, women and children.

Resolved, That as there are at the present time a large community residing in the adjoining county of San Bernardino, many of whom are living in open violation of one of the most important and Sacred laws of our State,

Be it Resolved, That we hereby respectfully request the Chief Executive of the State to enforce its laws upon this people.

Resolved, That we hold ourselves ready, at all times, to respond to the call of the proper authorities to assist, if necessary, in enforcing obedience to the laws.

PUBLIC MEETING AT SAN BERNARDINO. -- A meeting of anti-Mormon citizens was held on the 17th October at San Bernardino, which passed a preamble and resolutions to the effect that as the officers of the county and their sureties were all Mormons, who were about leaving for Great Salt Lake, the public funds were unsafe in their hands; and that they would therefore pay no more taxes to them; and would defend and protect each other in case these officers should attempt the enforcement of the payment of those taxes.

Another Train Attacked -- Mormon Rebellion.

S. B. Honea, of Franklin County, Arkansas, recently arrived at Los Angeles. He left home on the 9th of May last, for California. He saw nothing of armed bands till they reached Fort Bridger, in Utah Territory. Here they saw a large quantity of provisions stored, a cinsiderable number of Indians encamped all around the fort, and heard the people generally speaking of making preparations to go out and meet General Harney. At Fort Bridger, he was told by a merchant that at Fort Supply over 400 Indians were encamped, awaiting orders to attack the U. S. troops. About thirty miles from Fort Bridger, he met three companies of men, generally mounted, and all were well armed, having an abundance of baggage, their wagons being numbered in messes. Mr. Honea says he also here had a conversation with one of the Mormon soldiers, an Englishman, who, camping with the company, grew very communicative over the camp-fires. The substance of this conversation, Mr. Honea reports as follows:

He referred in bitter terms to the treatment the Mormons had received in Illinois and Missouri, reflected on the unjustness and tyranny of the people of the Unoted States, and said that the time was come to get even. He said they were on their way to meet Gen. Harney, to see what he was coming for: "If he was comicg peaceably, we will let him come, but if not, we will drive him back," were the words used. Another Mormon, named Killian, an old man, who lives about seven miles from Salt Lake City, spoke bitterly against the United States, deriounced Judge Drummond, and all the Federal officers, and rejoiced that the time had come when the saints would be avenged on their enemies -- that men were found who could face the enemy, and that Harney, with his 2,500 men, never would enter Salt Lake City. He also stated that Governor Brigham Young had ordered the people to prepare for war; that they should not sell emigrants anything; that they must lay up provisions; that the men and women must not dress up in store clothes any more, but that all must be saved to forward the cause of the Church against the common enemy -- that the men must be content with buckskin instead of broadcloth, and have plenty of guns and ammunition.

On the 17th Aug. Mr. Honea passed through the city of Salt Lake. Remained only three or four hours. Had a conversation with a merchant, a Gentile, who stated that on the previous Sunday Brigham Young had declared in the Temple [sic - Tabernacle?], that henceforth Utah was a separate and independent Territory, and owed no obedience or allegiance to any form or laws, but those of their own enactment, and called upon the people to stand together, and support him in maintaining the cause of God and the Church. Was told that the house of Gilbert & Garrison, had orders from Brigham to pack up and leave before the 1st of November.

During all the residue of this journey the train of Mr. Honea, was harassed by the Indians. They hired repeatedly Mormon guides, or "interpreters," as a protection aginst the savages, and for this purpose expended $1,815; but found that the wretches were acting the traitors' part, and seemed inclined rather to setting the Indians on to attack, than to protecting them. Two men in a train that joined, them, Capt. Turner, and Mr. Collins, were shot and seriously wounded while in the Mormon train [sic - town?] of Beaver, by the Indians. While near the Muddy, the Indians made another attack upon Mr. Honea's train,and run off 375 head of cattle.


Note: It appears that the leaders in Utah paid some attention to this issue of the Bulletin and Editor Thomas S. King's harsh recommendations. See the "California Mail" article in the Deseret News of Dec. 9, 1857.


 



Vol. ?                            San Francisco, Tues., October 27, 1857.                            No. ?



Topics of the Day.

From the news published in another column, there can be no doubt of the complicity of the Mormons with the Indians, in all the outrages which have of late been committed on the middle plains. There is no longer any safety for the emigrant he is forced on one side to submit to the extortions of the Mormon guides, and on the other, to the exactions of the Indians, [and is] too happy to escape with life. Both have united to fleece, rob and murder all those who fall into their hands. We are very much afraid we have not heard the last of the massacres by the Indians this year. Whatever trains may yet be in the way, will not escape without attacks. It will be seen from the statements published in another column, that there is little doubt that the Mormons had a knowledge beforehand of what the Indians were going to do were in constant communication with them during the time that the hapless emigrant train was battling against the savage foe, by whom they were assaulted that, though fully aware that men, women and children were being cruelly murdered, they neglected to render any assistance, and did not even go so far as to remonstrate, and that they openly rejoiced with the Indians in the successful accomplishment of their bloody work. Indeed, according to the statements of Messrs. Power, Warn and Honea, the Mormons cannot be separated from the Indians in all these terrible outrages. They were the prompters, if not actors in the dreadful scenes which have been enacted on the middle plains. How well they have succeeded in moulding the savages, with whom they dwell, for the accomplishment of whatever objects they may have in view, is sufficiently evidenced by the distinction they now make between Mormons and Americans. They have been taught to believe there are two races of white men in existence Mormons and Indians, and that while the former are their fast friends, the latter are their dreaded and uncompromising foes. It is horrible to contemplate that white men should be engaged in stirring up and goading on blood-thirsty savages to the commission of deeds of atrocity and blood to the massacre of defenseless women and children of their own race at least; but we are afraid it is but too true. The poisoning of a dead ox, for which the Indians asked, is stated as the main cause of the massacre; but that poisoning may have been done by the Mormons. The swaggering course pursued by the emigrants, and which no one will seek to justify, excited a thirst for vengeance in their minds, and this may have been the plan they adopted to gratify it, knowing the fearful vengeance it would bring down on the heads of the emigrants, if the act could be fastened on them. Such a theory is by no means improbable or far-fetched. The spirit by which the Mormons are actuated is no longer a secret; and no act or proceeding of theirs, no matter how fiendish or blood-thirsty, should excite astonishment. The people of Los Angeles, at a meeting recently held, adopted a preamble and resolutions calling on the President of the United States to take measures for the punishment of the authors of the recent wholesale butchery on the plains; and also calling on the Governor of the State to enforce the laws in San Bernardino, pledging themselves to respond to the call of the proper authorities, if necessary in enforcing obedience. Matters wear a menacing aspect!...

(under construction)




Note: Additional transcription pending -- courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher.


 



Vol. VIII.                            San Francisco, October 28, 1857.                            No. 18.


 

MORMON PLANS AND FEELING AT SALT LAKE. -- The Chroncile of this morning publishes a letter, written from Salt Lake City, on September 4th, by a woman resident there, to her husband, who is on a visit here. It is said to be a genuine document; and if so, strengthens the opinion entertained here as to the determination of the Mormons to resist the expected Federal troops, and declare the independence of Utah. From the reference to Jackson county, in the letter, it would seem that the Mormons are convinced that some day they will return in triumph to their old quarters in Missouri, from which they were driven in 1838. The writer says:

I have just received your letter to me, and also read one you wrote to sister _____. I am much disappointed, for I thought you would say positive you was coming home this fall. I think if you understood the spirit of the times in the Valley you would want to be here. All the men are preparing for war, both old and young. Some companies have gone out to meet the enemy; more are ready to go when called for. The carrying companies are all coming in; what they cannot bring with them they destroy. They have burned hundreds of tons of hay at the stations. * * * Brother Brigham says if the brethren will stand by him, he will never let the Gentiles come in the Valleys. He says, before they shall come here we will burn every house, fence and hay-stack, and flee to the mountains. We will make a Moscow of the cities and towns in these Valleys, and a Potter's field of every canyon that our enemies come into. Brother Kimball says all the women must have a dirk knife, so I wish you would bring me one.

(Here follow some details about business and family affairs. The writer resumes:)

You must bring plenty of powder and lead. Brother Brigham says, if every Saint will live their religion we will never be driven from these Valleys. We shall stay here until the time comes to go to Jackson county. We shall no more be called the traitors of Utah, but the free people of Deseret.


Note: An excerpt from the above mentioned letter, along with similar material, was published in the Coshocton, Ohio, Progressive Age, of Dec. 23, 1857. See the Liberty, Mo. Weekly Tribune of Apr. 9, 1858 for another letter of this type.


 



Vol. IX.                            San Francisco, Wed., October 28, 1857.                            No. 190.



The Mormon Murderers.

The details of the news which we published yesterday, received by the Senator from Los Angeles, are of a character which cannot fail to convince all who have read them, that the recent massacre of one hundred and eighteen emigrants at the Mountain Meadows was directly instigated, if not actually conducted by Mormons. Travellers coming through Salt Lake state that there such outrages were prophecied. On the road, the Mormon guides and interpreters exhibited the most perfect control over the Indians, and at San Bernardino, within the borders of our own State, the murder of over one hundred of our brethren is exulted over by the traitous wretches who have control of matters there, one of whom has been for several years a member of our State Legislature, and who, it is said, has sent to Governor Johnson for arms and ammunition, to suppress disturbances among the Indians. If the Governor complies with the request of this hoary-headed apologist for wholesale murder, he will be aiding, without doubt, in the consummation of other massacres, such as that of the Mountain Meadows.

The terrible events which have come recently crowding upon us, so rapodly, are heart-rending enough to stir up the feelings of any community not entirely dead and lost to all sense of common humanity, and sympathy with the hubdreds of slaughtered Americans, whose bones are whitening in the caves of ocean, or bleaching upon the hot sands of the desert. And when we have every reason to believe that the latter lie there, because a horde of traitorous wretches have sworn vengeance upon all our countrymen who cross their path -- we may well become excited, and we do not doubt that, in the language of our Los Angeles correspondent, "were a call made by the government, half our population would respond." We believe, throughout the length and breadth of California, the same feeling exists, and that when the tocsin is sounded, thousands of men from the extreme north to the southern border, will be ready to rush to the defence of their countrymen, and to inflict terrible vengeance upon their murderers.

After all the experiences which have been related, after all the publications of the threats made by the Mormon leaders at Salt Lake, after the facts have come to light which have, in relation to massacres by the Indians, no sane man can longer doubt that the Mormon hierarchy has determined upon a life-time warfare upon the citizens and government of the United States. They are leagued with the hostile Indian tribes, and with whom their elders, and preachers, and presidents, have instilled a bitter hatred to all Americans who are not Mormons. They are preparing to resist the U. S. forces upon their entrance into Utah -- and here is the wonderful fact existing before us, that we have in the very heart of our own territory, a body of men, organized under a government of their own, openly hostile to ours, threatening us with vengeance and death, and carrying their threats into execution, whenever opportunity offers.

What shall the government do? Continue to pursue the temporising policy which has permitted the growth of this at first insignificant and diminutive community into a powerful legion of armed men, daily growing stronger and better prepared to resist us? -- or shall not a determined effort be made to root out this social cancer? The seven [sic - several?] hundred men, now on their way to Utah, will, we firmly believe, be not only resisted, but successfully resisted, and we shall expect to hear, simultaneously, of their arrival and their defeat or flight. There are ten thousand fighting men at Salt Lake, well provided with arms and ammunition, and inspired by that sporit of religious fanaticism which, in all ages, has made men ready to fight with a desperate determination, such as we can be aroused to by no other feeling -- not even love of country. The route, between Salt Lake and the borders of California, must be protected by a large body of troops, who must not be permitted to remain stationed merely at certain points, but who should act as a patrol, constantly on the move. This must be done, or overland emigrants to California will be murdered and robbed continually.

The evidence of emigrants, which we gave in yesterday's issue, has been sent to Washington. The government will, we suppose, of course investigate the whole matter, and we hope, upon being satisfied of the facts, immediate and determined action will be taken. We are satisfied that the Mormon traitors must be rooted out of our territory, fully and finally -- that this must be the policy of our government, sooner or later, and that the sooner the war is commenced the better. Still, the government would not be authorized in acting, until they have received the most indubitable proofs of the treacherous, murderous conduct of the Mormons.

We doubt not that, in California, from five to ten regiments, of a thousand men each, could be recruited, in a very short space of time, and of men generally accustomed to hardships such as would have to be endured in such a campaign as they would be required to enter upon. If the government decides to take determined action in this matter, California will be found ready to aid her, with the best energies and best heart's blood, if need be, of thousands of her citizens.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, October 31, 1857.                                 No. ?



The Late Massacre.

The Los Angeles papers are filled with statements of immigrants who have lately arrived in that city from the Plains, relative to the massacre of the immigrants near the rim of the Great Basin. They confirm the previous reports and implicate the Mormons in that horrible butchery. They state that the Mormons and Indians are acting together, that they are on the most friendly terms, that the Elders have married the daughters of the chiefs, and that the Mormons furnish the savages with arms and ammunition and direct them to murder Americans wherever they have an opportunity. The Mormons are preparing for war, and with the assistance of their Indian allies intend to give General Harney battle. Brigham Young has declared Utah "a separate and Independent Territory, owing no obedience or allegiance to any form or laws, but those of his own enactment," and has called upon the Mormons and Indians to support him against the United States. Wm. Powers attended church in San Bernardino, and heard Gen. Hunt say in the pulpit, in alluding to the terrible massacre, "that the hands of the Lord was in it; whether it was done by whites or red skins, it was right!" Mr. Matthews another Mormon, said "the work had just begun, and it should be carried on until Uncle Sam and all his boys that were left, should come to Zion to beg for bread." This Matthews is an Elder and an irreclaimable scoundrel -- he could scarcely be the one without being the other. If the statements of these immigrants be true, and we have no reason to doubt them, the General Government will be forced to take some speedy and decided steps to teach Brigham Young, his assassins, thieves, vagabonds, harlots and Indian allies, that Uncle Sam is powerful enough to protect his children and punish his rebellious subjects.



NEW TERRITORY. -- We copy on our first page, from the State Journal, an interesting an instructive article on "the proposed new Territory in the Great Basin"... So long as the country remains under the jurisdiction of the Mormons, so long will it be sparsely settled and comparatively valueless. Permit the inhabitants of the valleys to establish a new Territory next Spring, and in less than three years it will be filled with hardy, industrious, enterprising people. The iron rule of Brigham Young has retarded the settlement of the proposed Territory, and he should no longer be allowed to exercise jurisdiction over it... We hope our Representatives will urge upon Congress not only the propriety but the necessity of establishing the new Territory.



The Mormon Standard, after a suspension of three weeks, again made its appearance in San Francisco, Friday last. -- The editor indignantly repels the insinuation that the Mormons, not the Indians, committed the horrible massacre near the rim of the Great Basin, an account of which we published in a former number. The Mormons may not have participated in the massacre, but the belief is general that they instigated the bloody deed.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, October 31, 1857.                         No. 25.



The late Outrages on the Plains,
Another account.

The following communication has been handed us for publication, and we give it insertion, wishing to place both sides of the question before our readers. We have, however, submitted it to Mr. Honea, who was of the party robbed, and who pronounces the statement a gross misrepresentation of the facts. The account, given of the conduct of the Bishop of Beaver, he pronounces false in every particular. So far from it being true, he accuses him of being the cause of the attack on Turner and Collins, who went to the town, the former to ask permission of the Bishop to drive the cattle on the pasture land, and the latter to get a chain mended, and who was pushed out of doors by the blacksmith to be killed by the Indians. It is also false, our informant says, that the interpreters restored 114 head of cattle; on the contrary, he says that after extorting $1800 from the company, they were the cause of the robbery of their cattle; and that after the Indians had run off the stock, one of the interpreters brought back a message from the Indians, to the effect, that if the company wanted to fight, for them to come on -- and then Indians and interpreters rode off together, and were seen no more.

Our informant has give us a reason why the names of these individuals are appended to this document, but we forbear to publish it; he says they spoke in very different terms of the interpreters, before coming to San Bernardino, from what are used in this communication.

SAN BERNARDINO, Oct. 18, 1857.    
SIR: Several gentlemen arrived in this city yesterday evening from off the Plains between here and Great Salt Lake city. They belong to Captains Dukes and Turner’s train, and left the Mormon settlements some twelve of fifteen days after the great massacre, of which I gave you a statement a few weeks ago. It appears that they have experienced much difficulty, and sustained great loss of property, whilst traveling through the Indian country; a statement of which I will give you below, having obtained it from a personal interview with those gentlemen.

As regards the "massacre," which took place at or near the Rim of the Great Basin, they have no definite knowledge; but from the information which they received and the knowledge which they have, both in relation to the murder and the causes which led to it, corresponds with the statement I gave you before, and corroborates the facts as set forth by Messrs. Mathews and Hyde.
They further say, that they neither saw nor heard anything that would lead a rational or unprejudiced mind to believe, or even suspect, that any of the Utah inhabitants were instigators in the causes, as has been intimated and even boldly asserted by many of the encouragers of Mormon persecution and misrepresentation, in this section of the country. But state that the general sympathy and excitement prevalent upon such occasions, pervades the minds of the people of that Territory and that the Mormon interpreters have used every means, and due diligence so far as they know, in obtaining the children, as well as to procure information respecting the circumstances of the catastrophe.

It seems from the statement of Messrs. Webb and others, whose names you will read at the close of this article, that they experienced their first Indian troubles between Corn and Beaver Creeks prior to leaving the settlements. The train, which consisted of twenty-three wagons, 450 head of loose cattle, and 107 men, women and children, divided whilst traveling through the settlements, to obtain a better opportunity for grazing their stock; and consequently had arranged their encampments several miles apart. Both divisions of the train had struck camp, the advance parties being five or eight miles from Beaver City. An Indian informed the Bishop of that city, that they were going to attack the train that night. The Bishop, immediately on the receipt of the information, sent some young men of his city to the train, to give them the necessary warning in regard to their danger. A portion of the men of the advance party, in company with the Mormon boys, went back for the purpose of bringing up the party which was in the rear. Before their arrival, they were fired upon by the Indians, but fortunately none of them were injured, and they received no further molestation. The Bishop sent, the next day, for Captains Dukes and Turner, for [the] purpose of giving them such information as he thought would be beneficial under the existing circumstances. While they, and others of their train were in the city, they were fired upon by a number of Indians who had collected there, and Captain Turner and one Mr. Collins were severely wounded, but were recovering.

Having ascertained, from these circumstances, something of the excitement prevalent among the Indians, they thought it best, before leaving the settlements, to get some interpreters to come with them through the Indian country, which they accordingly did. The interpreters were N. Johnson, D. Carter, Mr. Shirts, Ira Hatch, Mr. Lovett, and O. and F. Hamblin. From the fact of a former train having been murdered on the main road, they took a different route, on leaving the settlements, via Harmony, which intersects with the main traveled road, on the Rio Santa Clara, about thirty miles from the rim of the Basin. They state, after reaching the Santa Clara, they were surrounded almost hourly by the Indians; but by the assistance of the interpreters, and giving them a few head of cattle and articles of clothing, they succeeded in getting along without material difficulty until arriving at the Muddy, which is about 175 miles from the settlements.

They arrived at the Muddy about ten o’clock in the morning, and being surrounded by about 200 Indians, they made preparations for leaving by 4 o’clock P.M., of the same day. While stopping there, the Indians kept out of the encampment, measurably, though not without much difficulty. After leaving camp, and having traveled about seven miles on the road, (the train being scattered along on the road, as large trains commonly are) were surrounded by about 400 Indians, and [326] head of their cattle were driven off.

Mr. Webb, whose name you will read below, was in advance of the stock, (it being eight or nine oíclock in the night,) and an Indian boy, who fell in on leaving the Muddy, who was pretending to assist in driving; the Indian asked for water, and on being informed by Mr. Webb that he had none, the boy immediately stopped to one side and made a noise, which is thought to have been a signal. They were immediately surrounded by the Indians, and the cattle were being drove off by the Indians in spite of every endeavor to prevent it. The interpreters thought it best not to fire upon them; and Mr. Hamblin told the men that if they thought anything of the women and children, to go back to the wagons and protect them, until he could ascertain what the difficulty or excitement was. After returning to the wagons and seeing no Indians there, Hamblin and others of the train went in pursuit of the cattle, and succeeded in getting back 114 head of lame stock, that had been left behind. The other interpreters were still with the Indians, or supposed to be, endeavoring to get them to bring the cattle back. Mr. Hamblin, and others of the train, after returning [column 2] with the 114 head, went again in pursuit of the stock, and on arriving near to the Muddy, found that a vast number of the Indians had stopped in a deep hollow, in the rear of the cattle, which were, to all appearance, being driven still further off. Here the men stopped, considering it unsafe to go any further. Mr. Hamblin told the men he would go down to the Indians, and if he found that it was not safe for them to come down he would fire a pistol, which would be a signal for them to go back to the wagons. Soon after going down, he fired two shots from his pistol, and the men returned to their wagons, and drove right on for the Las Vegas, which is about sixty miles from the Muddy.

This was the last ever seen of the Indians or interpreters. What the result was, or may turn out to be, time alone can develop. I understand that there are a variety of opinions in regard to the conduct of the interpreters; but those, whose signatures are hereunto annexed, are of the opinion that the interpreters did all in their power to save the lives of the persons in the train, and to preserve the stock. But not having heard what became of them, they are at a loss to know what will be the result; but believe that they have either been killed or are forcibly detained by the Indians in some way or other.
Signed,       WM. WEBB,      
IRAH BAISE,       WM. S. BLEDSOE,      
WM. H. TANNEHILL.           

The above named gentlemen left the train at the Cottonwood Springs. In all probability, before the others get in, something more relative to the circumstances may be found out.

I received the following letter this evening, from Ellis Eames, Esq., which I will send enclosed, relating to the relief party which left here this morning.
Yours truly,                             
J. WARD CHRISTIAN,     
San Bernardino.     

MR. J. WARD CHRISTIAN, Dear Sir: Intelligence reached here yesterday, that a company of emigrants had been robbed by the Indians, near the Muddy, between here and Salt Lake, and were in a suffering condition on the plains for want of provisions. As soon as I heard the report, which is undoubtedly true, I commenced circulating a subscription, and must say, for the credit of San Bernardino, that the first man I met was Ebenezer Hanks; he told me to look no farther for any amount of flour that was wanted; he would furnish sufficient individually. Mr. Bachman, of Los Angeles, being here on business, put up an ample amount of groceries. Lewis Jacobs & Co.; Dixon & Co., of the Rainbow; U. U. Tyler, and others, soon loaded a four mule team, belonging to Mr. Phineas Daily, who volunteered his services to haul the supplies; a sufficient number of men also volunteered for the protection of the supplies. It is expected that they will meet the suffering train at the last crossing of the Mohave, or in the vicinity of the Bitter Springs.
ELLIS EAMES.      

THE GUNNISON MURDER -- In connection with the above, and to do full justice to the Mormons, in this matter also, who have been so repeatedly charged in public speeches, and also in newspapers, with complicity in the murder of the late Captain Gunnison, we make the following extract from the Report of Lieut. E. J. Beckwith, who succeeded Gunnison in the command of the party, and who completed the survey commenced by that officer to which our attention has been directed during the week. The extract is from the report made to the Hon. Jefferson Davis, late Secretary of War:

The statement which has from time to time appeared (or been copied) in various newspapers of the country since the occurrence of these sad events, charging the Mormons or Mormon authorities with instigating the Indians to, if not actually aiding them in, the murder of Captain Gunnison and his associates, is, I believe not only entirely false, but there is no accidental circumstance connected with it affording the slightest foundation for such a charge.

(under construction)




Note: Additional transcription pending -- courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher.


 



Vol. IX                            San Francisco, Sun., November 1, 1857.                            No. 194.



LETTER  FROM  ANGEL'S  CAMP.
______
(From and Occasional Correspondent.)

FURTHER PARTICULARS ABOUT THE MURDERED IMMIGRANTS --
THEIR NAMES AND CIRCUMSTANCES -- THE MORMONS GUILTY OF THE CRIME
-- HOW THEY SHOULD BE PUNISHED.

Angels, October 29, 1857.    
By the late news from Los Angeles, I see that the information given by me in my last letter, in reference to the names of the murdered emigrants, is about to prove true. In view of this fact, I went out this morning to see the immigrants that gave me the information, to learn further particulars from them. I called on but one of the families, and they informed me that in Arkansas they lived but three miles from Bakers farm, and that he was generally known by the name of "Jack" or "Captain Jack" Baker. He was reported to be wealthy, and left home with four hundred head of cattle, accompanied by his two sons. One son, named George, had spent some years in California, and had lived about Stockton, Sonora and Columbia. The other son was single. The old man intended, as soon as he could settle here, to return by water and bring out the remainder of his family. In his company were two brothers, by the name of Mitchel, (one of whom had his family,) a man named Milan Jones, and a widow named Tacket, who was coming to live with her son in California. I think this son is living near Tuttletown. My informants saw all these persons at Fort Bridger, about the last of July. Fancier (I wrote Fazier by mistake in my other letter) had spent some years in California, but my informant did not know in what part. They think the whole company had at least a thousand head of cattle with them. They also had many splendid rifles and guns, and plenty of them. My informants tell me, that the day they passed the junction of the Cut-off and the main road through Salt Lake City, (thirty miles this side of the city,) they saw a party of Indians enjoying a feast given them by the Mormons. The Mormons said they had just finished a treaty with the Indians, the purpose of which was that the Indians were not to trouble the whites who travelled through by the Salt Lake route, as they wanted them to pass that way in order to trade with them.

The last news also confirms my opinion as to who were the perpetrators of this deed. There were some facts connected with the first information given by the Mormons of this slaughter, that convinced me that the murderers were not Indians. It may be true that Indians took part in the work, but the blame rests with those who led them on. The first of these facts is, that the young children were saved.This was no Indian act, but was natural for the Mormons, who wanted to train them to their faith. The second is, the suppression of all the names. Now, if no one of that large company did not tell his name to any Mormon, they certainly left some evidence among the property as to who they were and where they were from. The third is, the statement that the Indians had told the whites what they had done.

We are all at a loss to know what is to be done with these people, and we dread to contemplate the horrors of the future. If soldiers must be sent to conquer them, rivers of blood must flow through their valleys before it will be done. If they are to be left alone to do as they will, the great highway of travel between the Atlantic States and the Pacific will be closed, and Utah will be the place of refuge for all the villains who escape from justice in the States, and a worse set will be gathered there than the world has ever seen.

The only remedy seems to be to dissolve the Territorial government, declare their laws null and void, send large bodies of soldiers to be stationed at every town and settlement in the Territory, let martial law prevail, then hang or shoot every man that rebels, punish every one according to the crime he commits, and give encouragement to the Gentiles to settle there. By this policy the country will fill up with Gentiles.   P.



More Mormon Massacres.

The San Andres Independent published an extra on the 29th ultimo, containing statements by Mr. Louis Fine and Richeson Abbott, who have lately arrived from the Plains, and report more Mormon massacres... [remainder of article not yet transcribed]


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. ?                            San Francisco, November 3, 1857.                            No. ?



NEWS  FROM  THE  PLAINS.
___________

The News of the Massacre Confirmed -- Perils of the Emigrants --
Complicity of the Mormons with the Indians -- Warlike Preparations
of the Mormons -- Declaration of Mormon Independence.

We have dates from Los Angeles to the 24th of October, and from San Deigo to the 17th of the same month. The news is exceedingly important.

The report of the late massacre has been fully confirmed. The number of persons slaughtered by the Indians was 118. Great excitement prevailed in Los Angeles on the announcement, shortly after the receipt of the news, that parties were in town who corroborated all the statements that had been previouslt made. A public meeting was called, and the persons referred to attended it and made statements -- a condensation of which we give. Their names are Power[s] and Warn. They had lately returned from Salt Lake City. Mr. Power[s], in his narrative says: --

(see original George Powers statement in Los Angeles paper)


Mr. Warn, in his statement, says that on his journey through the settlements, which was a week or ten days subsequent to the passage of the murdered train, he everywhere heard the same threats of vengeance against them for their boisterousness and abuse of Mormons and Mormonism, as was reported; and these threats seemed to be made with the intention of preparing the mind to expect a calamity, and also when the calamity occurred, it should appear to fall upon transgressors as a matter of retribution.

Mr. Wren says, according to his memorandum: -- "On the 15th of September we encamped at Corn Creek. Here I had conversation with the Indian Agent concerning the poisoning of the ox. He said that six Indians had died; that others were sick and would die. Upon one of them the poison had worked out all over his breast, and he was dead next morning, as reported. Afterward I conversed with an Indian, said to be the war chief Ammon, who spoke good English. I inquired how many of his tribe had died from eating the poisoned animal. He replied not any, but some were sick. He did not attribute the sickness to poison, nor did he give any reason for it. His manner and that of his people towards us was not only friendly but cordial; and he did not mention the train which had been doomed. Besides the Mormon train there were encamped at this place two or three emigrant trains amounting to fifteen or eighteen wagons, with whom the Indians were as friendly as with ourselves."

One reason that may be assigned for the massacre of this train is, that it was known to be in possession of considerable valuable property, and this fact excited the cupidity of the Mormons. It was said that they had over four hundred head of stock, besides mules, &c. They were well supplied with arms and ammunition, an element of gain which enters largely into all Mormon calculations. The train was composded of families who all seemed to be in good circumstances, and as they were moving to California, their outfit indicated that they might be in possession of considerable funds. The men were very free in speaking of the Mormons; their conduct was said to have been reckless, and they would commit little acts of violence for the purpose of provoking the Saints. Feeling perfectly safe in their arms and numbers, they seemed to set at defiance all powers that could be brought against them. And they were not permitted to feel the dangers that surrounded them until they were cut off from all hope of relief....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                            San Francisco, Thurs., November 5, 1857.                            No. ?

 

The most important items of news by this steamer [from Los Angeles] is the display before the public of a large amount of Evidence, going to show that the party of one hundred and eighteen immigrants, massacred in the southern part of Utah, while on their way to California -- news of which occurrence was sent from here by the last mail -- were murdered by Mormons. Mr. George Powers arrived a few days since at Los Angeles, from Salt Lake City, and reports having heard many Mormons threaten to kill Gentiles passing through their country. He met a mixed party of Mormons and Indians going toward a Mormon settlement from the scene of the massacre, and they had in possession bundles of clothing and other articles, apparently the spoil of the murdered; and the whole party appeared to be on friendly terms with one another and to be in high spirits. This Mr. Powers also states that in San Bernardino he heard Captain Hunt, a man of authority among the Mormons there, say he was glad for the massacre, and believed that the hand of the Lord was in it, whether it was done by the whites or the redskins. P. M. Warn of Genesee county, New Yorkm=, who came through about the same time with Mr. Powers, believes also, from numerous facts observed by him, that the Mormons are guilty of the bloody crime. Messrs. Abbott and Fine, two gentlemen who have lately been at San Andres, from the Humboldt river, reports great hostility on the part of the Mormons towards the immigrants coming to California by the South Pass, and great friendship with the Indians, who had made attacks on immigrants. Both Mr. Abbott and Mr. Fine know of cases where trains were attacked in the Mormon country, by Indians led on by numerous white men, supposed to be Mormons. Mr. Abbott says five hundred immigrants have been killed this year on the road between Salt Lake and California by Indians and Mormons, but this estimate is certainly very much exaggerated.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. ?                            San Francisco, November 5, 1857.                            No. ?



THE  MORMONS   AND  THE  LATE  MASSACRE.
___________

Three emigrant families arrived yesterday in Sacramento, by the Carson Valley route. They report, says the Union, many sad evidences of outrage and murder at different points along the route, particularly in the vicinity of Goose Creek. Near this creek, their attention was attracted by the appearance of a human foot protruding from the ground, and on examining the spot, the remains of three murdered men were found buried only three or four inches below the surface. Upon another grave there lay two dogs, alive but much emaciated, and so pertinacious in retaining their lonely resting place that no effort could entice or drive them from the spot. Their master was, most probably, the occuoant of that grave, and their presence there, under such circumstances, was a touching exhibition of canine instinct and devotion. A few miles further on, they came upon another scene of murder, where, upon the ground, were strewn a few bones, and also knots of long, glossy hair, torn from the head of some ill-fated woman. near by were the remains of three head of cattle, with arrows still sticking in them.

Reports brought by these families tend strongly to corroborate the suspicion already existing against the Mormons as the instigators, if not the perpetrators, of the recent wholesale massacre of emigrants at Santa Clara canyon. Mr. Pierce, who came by way of Salt Lake, and joined the other two families at the Sink of the Humboldt, reports some five hundred Indians encamped near Salt Lake, who, as he learned from the Mormons, were retained as allies to operate against the troops sent out by the Government. He was also assured that these Indians had been instructed not to molest the emgration this year, as preparations were not sufficiently complete to enable the Mormons to make a stand against the United States. In the city itself, large crowds of Mormons were nightly practicing military drill, and there was every evidence of energetic preparations for some great event. Before his family left Salt Lake, vague declarations of a threatening character were made, to the effect that, next year, "the overland emigrants must look out;" and it was even insinuated that the last trains this year might be destroyed. From the Mormon train which recently left Carson Valley, and which these families met on the way, similar statements were vaguely communicated, one Mormon woman even going so far as to congratulate an old lady in one of these families upon her safe arrival so near her destination, and assuring her that "the last trains of this year would not get through so well, for they were to be cut off." We give these statements as we received them from members of these families, and, admitting their correctness, which we have no reason to doubt, they certainly go far to confirm a terrible suspicion.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



TO CORRECT MIS-REPRESENTATION WE ADOPT SELF-REPRESENTATION.
Vol. II.                            San Francisco, November 6, 1857.                            No. 31.



Killing of Immigrants --

Mormons falsely Accused --


Further Endurance no longer a Virtue.
______

After this, we presume, there will not be a white man killed, or an emigrant train attacked between the Sierra Nevada and the Western or Southern States, on any route, at what will be credited to the Mormon. They may be as innocent as angels, but that will make no difference; the determination is apparent to heap upon them the odium of every such deed. The published estimate of the man, Abbot, which has obtained considerable circulation lately, is, that the Mormons and Indians have killed five hundred immigrants on the road between Salt Lake and California during this year alone. Trains have been attacked by Indians led on by white men, and the white men were, of course, concluded to be Mormons. One statement says, that they were known to be Mormons, because they swore. The statement made by Mr. Hones, who came by way of the Southern Utah route, via San Bernardino, and whose testimony is adduced as evidence that the Mormons were the instigators, if not the perpetrators of the massacre at Mountain Meadows -- goes to prove that the Mormons were distinguished from the Gentiles, by the Indians on that route, by their swearing. This person says that the Mormon interpreters urged them to refrain from swearing, as the Indians would know that they were not Mormons, if they did not take this precaution. The swearing therefore of those whose men who were among the Indians on the Northern route, is not an evidence that they were Mormons, but rather that they were Gentiles; moreover, it is preposterous to suppose that, if they were Mormons, they would let expressions drop, such as we see reported that immigrants have heard, which would lead those whom they attacked to recognize them as Mormons. If they were Mormons disguised as Indians, and they considered such disguise necessary for the concealment of their identity, they would be very sure to let nothing escape them that would cause suspicion to fall upon them; but if they were rascals who wished suspicion to be diverted from themselves and to fall upon the Mormons, it is quite reasonable to suppose that the would disguise themselves as Indians, and also be sure to let some expression fall from them that would lead those whom they assailed and whose minds were already filled with suspicion and fear about the Utah, to suppose that the Mormons were leading on and instigating the Indians to plunder and murder them.

The course that editors and others in California have taken in their treatment of the Mormons, has given all the encouragement needed to scoundrels of every grade to rob, murder and attack trains with impunity between here and Salt Lake. They have seen the disposition which is every where manifest to charge the Mormons with the commission of every conceivable crime, and have had every opportunity of knowing that all that is necessary to escape detection is to arrange their plundering schemes in such a manner that suspicion will fall on that people. Let the story be started that the Mormons have had a hand in any wickedness, and there is an end to investigation. A question is never asked about the rebutting testimony; it is enough to know that the Mormons are the accused party, and it is at once concluded that, of course, the allegations must be true. Every penny-a-liner in the country then immediately begins to threaten and pile abuse on to the Mormons, and has any number of suggestions to make for their extermination.

This is literally the truth, and it must be familiar to every reader of public journals in California. We have had an illustration of it before us this past week or two in the reports that have obtained circulation relative to the massacre of the company of emigrants at the rim of the Great Basin, or Mountain Meadows. No sooner was it known that a massacre had taken place, than it was charged to the Mormons. Innocent or guilty, it made not a particle of difference, they had to bear the onus of the butchery. With such a state of feeling–such a pre-disposition to saddle them with the bloody deed whether or no, testimony of a damning character was not long wanting to fully confirm all that they had been charged with. Could it not have been found on earth, the lower regions would have been raked to obtain it.

But it was found, and the thousand-tongued press heralded it forth. Every circumstance, however trivial; every word, however idly spoken; every look, however innocently given, was misconstrued, and a list of charges based upon them against the people of Deseret which find a place in the columns of every newspaper, and are industriously blazoned throughout the civilized world. What if they should prove to be baseless and utterly false, who cares? they are only Mormons that will suffer. It is not worth while to make and inquiry relative to any rebuttal that may be offered of charges against them; if they were successfully rebutted, the refutation would not attract notice. Is not this the idea indulged in, we ask? Examine the case in point. Sift the evidence that these charges are based upon. It is said that the Mormons killed or caused this train to be killed, because they were from Arkansas and Parley P. Pratt was murdered in Arkansas. It is said that the train was blotted out because they had property, and the Mormons coveted it. It is said that they were Gentiles, and that the Mormons had said they would be the means of killing every Gentile -- of cutting off every train.

Who are the witnesses that testify that the Mormons committed this bloody deed, or were the instigators of it? Are they not Gentiles? Did not the majority of them come from Arkansas? Had they no property? If any one or all of these motives prompted the Mormons to kill off or to instigate the extirpation of the train alluded to, how happened it, in the name of all that is just, that those parties escaped, who are now cited as witnesses and who followed on the trail of the murdered train? -- How happened it that they were assisted by the Mormons, escorted into their fort when attacked by Indians, protected and guided by them through the exasperated red men; when to all their other motives for murder was added the additional one of concealment? Had they killed or caused to be killed the first train for the motives assigned, who would think, if they would reflect upon it for a moment, that they would let others equally as objectionable pass by unmolested, especially when they knew that they would not fail to charge them with the slaughter? But the enlightened press (?) do not condescend to notice these things. It would be treating the Mormons like white men -- like freemen, equally entitled with themselves to all the rights of American citizens.

In one corner of the paper in which these accusatory statements were published (the Los Angeles Star,) we perceived a little notice which stated that the editor had received from Mr. J. Ward Christian of San Bernardino, a long statement of the late attack, by the Indians, on the emigrant train on the Salt Lake road, differing materially from that which he had already published; and, perhaps, he would insert it in his next issue. Scarcely a paper that has published all the statements from which this materially differed, has noticed the existence of such a statement. Coming from San Bernardino, it must be justificatory of the Mormons, and, therefore, must be ignored. -- Every other accused party may have the benefit of a doubt; but a Mormon -- Never. They are fearful that the unfavorable impressions which they wish made on the public mind in respect to the Mormons, should be weakened; therefore, every statement that would increase the hatred of the masses against "Mormonism" and the carefully published, and duly compiled in the summary of news sent on the steamer to the East; but the exculpatory evidence is not once alluded to. -- This was the course the pursued with the Drummond slanders, until their author's character was so completely exposed that he was a stench in the nose of every virtuous man. And when the time arrives, as it most assuredly will, that the utter falsity of those charges will also be made apparent, the exposure will be quietly hushed up and no more be said about it than can possibly be helped.

Our contemporaries think that a crisis is approaching. In this we agree with them. It is time that there should be a change of some kind; we care but little what it may be. With the Lord to uphold the cause of the just, it can not be any worse than it has been. For ourself we are sick and weary of enduring such treatment as we, in common with our co-religionists, have endured for years past. We have borne the yoke so long that our patience is nearly exhausted. This continual abuse and piling on of false charges–this eternal whine about Mormon treason, Mormon aggressions, Mormon licentiousness, with these oft-repeated threats of whipping us into an abjuration of our principles and of exterminating us, we are tired of hearing. We know that the Mormons in Deseret are an industrious, peaceable, God-fearing people, and that they have been most foully abused and vilified. All they have asked or now ask, is justice; all they desire is their guaranteed rights. These they never have had; but we, as one individual whose interests are wholly identified with theirs, feel that the time has arrived when it is but right that they be demanded, and if needs be, contended for.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, November 7, 1857.                         No. 26.



The Late Outrages on the Plains --
Further Particulars.

For some time past, the all-engrossing topic with the people of this section of the State, has been the position assumed by the Mormon leaders in reference not alone to the people, but the Government of the United States. We have received numerous communications on this subject, some of which we place before our readers, to the exclusion of all other matters. We direct attention to the various documents, as they are well worthy a careful perusal: --

STATE OF CALIFORNIA,
County of San Bernardino.

On this, the 2d day of November, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven, personally appeared before me, Marcus Katz, a Notary Public, duly commissioned and sworn, for, and in the county San Bernardino, State of California, John Aiken, made known to me to be the person herein described, who deposes and says:

I started from Port Gibson, State of Mississippi, in the summer of 56, to New York, to engage a passage by steamer to California, but I was taken sick, and returned to Texas, and thence to Kansas, where I took charge of a drove of cattle, of 973, for Thomas Box, a Mormon, to deliver them at Salt Lake city. We started from Leavenworth city on the 22d of June last. We proceeded quietly and uninterruptedly on our journey as far as Sweet Water. Here we saw about one hundred and fifty armed men, (all Mormon); they had established an observatory to watch the approach and movements of Gen. Harney’s army. We was informed by them, that the surrounding mountains were alive with men, to watch the movements of the army. We understood that there would be no danger if we turned our stock out unguarded; which we found to be the case, because the proprietor was a Mormon. The owner gave them some beeves; and was on very intimate terms. We proceeded on our way as far as Fort Bridger; saw nothing of importance, except that several expresses passed us, to and from the various stations of their army. I learned nothing from any of the expresses, as they only conversed with the owner of the stock. We camped near Fort Bridger, I suppose about one mile and a half; saw nothing of their preparations, as I did not go nearer than a mile within their battlements. We proceeded to Echo Canon, forty miles from Salt Lake city. We saw a number of Mormon soldiers in the cañon, guarding that pass, secreted in the brush; they made no fires at night and said that the U.S. army should not pass them. They had great confidence in their allies, the Indians; they did not intend to meet the army in open field, but to ambush them, and the Indians were to run of the horses, stock, &c. We next met a company of armed men, with a train of wagons loaded with an outfit of provisions, munitions of war, &c., about twelve miles from Salt Lake city, on the 20th day of September, early in the morning. We learned from Dr. Dunion, surgeon to Brigham Young’s army, that they had taken a vote at Salt Lake city, that if the United States army forced its way into Utah, that they themselves would burn their city, towns, forts, &c., and lay every habitation in ashes; they had already picked out secret places in the mountains, to "cache" their provisions, and make their future abode with the Indians. The Doctor stated that arrangements were already entered into, that provided the army should enter the settlements, that every city, town and village in the States of California, Missouri and Iowa should be burned immediately that they had men to do this who were not known to be Mormons! And that they would cut off all the emigrant trains, army stores, stock, &c.; that no man, woman or child should hereafter cross the plains, without being scalped. That they depended and expected the Indians to perform this infernal and cowardly part of the their designs.

We arrived at the city in the afternoon of the same day. Here I found all that I had heard stated by the soldiers on their way out to their various stations assigned them, confirmed by the repetition of the same by the people of the city. I found here amongst the people of the city the most hostile feeling and bitter sentiments that the heart of man could possibly conceive. I was cautioned to be very cautious in my remarks, and say nothing against the Mormons, by a friend from Yankee land, who has to exercise the utmost discretion in all he said or done. Here I learned that it was necessary for me to get a passport form the War Department of Young’s army, to secure my safety through the settlements, which I did, and found it very advantageous to me on my way through the settlements.

Adjutant General's office, Utah Territory.    
Great Salt Lake City, Sept. 21, 1857.    
To all whom it may concern. This to certify that the bearer, Mr. John Aiken, who is peaceably travelling through the Territory, is permitted to pass on his way to California.
Daniel H. Wells.    
Lt. General Commanding.    
By order of the Lt. General Commanding,
    James Ferguson, Adjutant General.
Endorsed by Col. Dame, of Parowan, Sept. 28, 1857.
Wm. H. Dame.    
Colonel Iron Military District.    


This may seem strange to Americans, that they are not permitted to travel on their own soil, in Utah, without first obtaining passports; this may be accounted for, on the ground that Utah Territory is placed under martial law, and none but those who are considered friendly to their cause, can obtain passports out of the Territory. I obtained my passport through the recommendation of Captain Duncan, a Mormon, who traveled to Salt Lake in the company with which I was engaged. I started from the Mormon city on the 23d of September, and traveled three hundred and twenty-five miles on the southern route to California by myself. I passed through the principal towns on this route being stopped by the Mormon officers and Indian chiefs, declaring that no American could leave the Territory without showing his authority and paying the Indians for the privilege; this I acceded to, by paying to the Indians about forty dollars, besides blankets and clothing, &c. All this occurred within the limits of the Mormon settlements. After I left the Mormons, I got along peaceably with the Indians, who are not directly under Mormon influence. I stayed at Painter Creek several days, within six miles of the scene of the late horrible massacre, where I joined the company of the U.S. mail to San Bernardino. John Hunt, the mail carrier, refused any protection whatever; said that I to fight my own battles, as they were friendly with the Indians, and did not wish to incur their displeasure. While at Painter Creek, I saw the Mormon drawing some of the wagons belonging to persons who fell in the late massacre towards Cedar City; they did not explain to me anything of their business, or of their possession of the wagons; seemed very distant and indifferent in their communications. I asked no questions; I wished to avoid suspicion.

After leaving Painter Creek, and arriving at the field of blood, I discovered several bodies that were slain, in a state of nudity and a state of putrefaction. I saw about twenty wolves feasting upon the carcases [sic] of the murdered. Mr. Hunt shot at a wolf, they ran a few rods and halted. I noticed that the women and children were more generally eaten by the wild beasts than the men. Although Cap. Baker and a number of others of the slain party were my acquaintances, yet I dared not express my sentiments in the company of Hunt and his companions, knowing that I was traveling with enemies to my country and countrymen. Mr. Hunt and his companions often laughed, and made remarks derogatory to decency, and contrary to humanity, upon the persons of those who were there rotting, or had become food to wild beasts. Although this terrible massacre occurred within six miles of Painter Creek settlement, and thirty from Cedar City, yet it appears that the Mormons are determined to suffer their carcasses to remain uncovered, for their bones to bleach upon the plains.

On the 17th day of October, I saw the tracks of a large herd of cattle going up the Santa Clara, toward the Mormon settlements, we supposed them to be the stolen cattle that were run off from the trains of Captains Dukes and Turner, as it was not customary for large herds of cattle to travel in that direction. I saw the tracks of several shod horses and mules following behind, supposed to be the animals used by the robbers. Where we first met the trail of these cattle, is where the road leaves the Santa Clara; ten miles from Hamblinís Fort, the residence of the Hamblins and Hatch, who were interpreters for the company. We continued on the trail of the cattle a distance of 100 miles, to the Muddy, near the place to where they were taken. I judge from the appearance of the trail that they were at least the number of 300 head. I know nothing more of importance. I arrived at San Bernardino on the 30th of October, and found the Mormons very distant and curious, very inquisitive about the affairs of Utah, but so far as I discovered, the Independent citizens are free and frank in their conversations and transactions.

I forgot to mention, in the proper place, that I met Nephi Johnson, one of the interpreters, at Painter Creek, of whom I inquired of the prosperity of the train to which he had been one of the interpreters and guides, to which he replied, that the train had passed safe; not even intimating that the emigrants had lost any of their cattle. Next day I met Mr. Hatch, at the same place, he told me that the train had lost over 200 head of cattle by the Indians.

A conversation between Mr. Hatch and Hamblin, occurred at this place, which seemed to betray something connected with the stolen cattle. Hamblin, the President of this fort, told Hatch to go and brand his own cattle, before he turned them out with his. This occurred on the 15th day of October, a few days after the robbery occurred. This conversation excited my curiosity to listen. Mr. Hamblin sold a steer to one of the Mormons; the steer was very poor; this was accounted for, because the steer had been driven to the Muddy and back.

Sworn and subscribed to, on this second day of November, 1857.
JOHN AIKEN.      

In witness whereof, I have set my hand (seal) and affixed my official seal, on the day and year first above written.
MARCUS KATZ, Notary Public.



San Bernardino, Nov. 3d, 1857.    
Editor of Los Angeles Star,

Sir: After reading the statement of S. B. Honea, as published in the Star of the 24th ult., it appears to receive the approval of all the members of Captain Dukes company. And desirous that the facts connected with our misfortunes whilst traveling through the Mormon settlements in Utah Territory, should be known, we hereby testify that Mr. S. B. Honea has simply stated the truth, and facts connected with the circumstances as described in his narrative, and not in any instance exaggerated. Signed,
	Wm. C. Dukes, Captain; from Missouri;
	James G. Bighan, “
	Wm. Wilson, “
	Wm. Cooper, “
	James Cooper, “
	Wm. J. Dole,(?) “
	Wm. Combs, “
	Robert R. Hays, “
	James Wilson, “
	W. H. Horton,		 Arkansas; 
	W. Harton, “
	Orlon Horton,			“
	Wm. Horton, sen.,	 “
	Isaiah Baise, “
	Wm. H. Harrington, “
	John Daurity, “
	Joseph F. M. Daurity, “
	George W. Davis, “
	W. B. Crook, “
	Wm. L. Bevert, “
	Abner Mount, “
	John Hillhouse,		Salt Lake city, Utah;
	Wm. J. Hillhouse, “
	John Ashcroft,		Battle Creek, Utah
	George Cook,		London, England;
	F. M. Nelson		Texas.

Mr. G. W. Davis adds that when he was at Fillmore city, the Bishop said that he could scarcely withhold the brethren from following after the train (which was afterwards massacred) and cutting it into pieces; because parties of that train cursed the Mormons for not selling them provisions. The Bishop said that they had instructions from Brigham Young not to sell any provisions to emigrants unless they could get guns, revolvers, or ammunition for pay. This very much enraged a Dutchman, who threatened, or said, that if he had a good riding horse, he would go back to Salt Lake and kill Brigham. The Bishop said that the only way that he could control his men was that he promised them to set the Indians on the doomed train. Mr. Davis then proceeded as far as Beaver, where he found the Bishop very friendly with him; and as Davis had not attached himself to any train he deemed it necessary to do so, and accordingly he waited here two or three days for the arrival of Captain Dukesí company. During his stay here, the Bishop frequented Mr. Davis’s wagon, and preached the Mormon doctrines, to which Davis listened without opposing it. Finally the Bishop solicited the hand of Miss Eliza in marriage, (spiritual, of course,) at which Eliza, father, mother, and all the family, felt very indignant. The reverend gentleman almost insisted on the family wintering at that place, but Mr. Davis thought that he would go as far as San Bernardino any way. The Bishop told Davis not to join the Missouri train that was then coming up, because the Mormons were all down on the Missourians; and he anticipated trouble would ensue between them and the Indians before they left the Territory; but if he could not better [betray] himself, he would give him information how to escape trouble: If he would drop the two hind-most bows of his wagon, he would vouch for his safety; that the Indians would not hurt the first hair of his head! However, Mr. Davis joined Captain Dukes company, without paying much heed to the advice which he had received; and shared in the perils and dangers which followed; which you have already published in the statement of Mr. Honea.

The first division of this company arrived in San Bernardino on the 31st of October, consisting of seventy-one souls altogether: twenty-two men, seventeen women, and thirty-two children; all enjoying good health. The second division of this train, under the supervision of Captain Nicholas Turner, is expected to arrive in the course of five or six days.

Having seen an article in the last issue of the Star, over the signature of Ellis Eames, to J. Ward Christian, giving a list of the names of the gentlemen who so liberally subscribed provisions, groceries, &c., for the relief of the suffering emigrants on the plains, I will say, for the benefit of those gentlemen who sent provisions to the emigrants, by Mr. Phineas Daley, that on his arrival at the first camp of the emigrants, he distributed a small portion of his load to the sufferers on the same terms as Messrs Van Luvan, J. H. Brooks, and P. Brown did theirs, namely gratis. But Daley and his companions proceeded to the second encampment, where the provisions were most needed and passed themselves off as Anti-Mormons; and said that Van Luvan had sold all his load to the first camp (which was a lie.) Daley sold flour at eight cents per pound; coffee, twenty cents; sugar, twenty cents, tobacco, thirty-seven and a half cents per plug; and Spanish beef, which they killed on the Mohave, at eight cents; and some of the articles were not distributed on any terms.   Respectfully yours,
HENRY MOGRIDGE.    



STATE OF CALIFORNIA,
Los Angeles County, [ss]

Wm. Webb being duly sworn deposeth and saith:

I arrived in San Bernardino, Oct. 17th, 1857. I was a member of Captains Dukes and Turner’s train and in company with eight others left said train about 275 miles from San Bernardino, and traveled on foot to that city. We came in this way, because the train was not able to furnish us with animals to ride, and were nearly out of provisions, having been robbed of all their cattle, except those which were too lame to be run off, or too feeble to be driven by the robbers.

On leaving the train we were told by the Captains and the company, that on arriving in San Bernardino, we must say nothing against the Mormons, as that city was composed of Mormons, and that we must not excite them, as they might cut them all off before they could get in, and also fail to get them to forward supplies to keep the company alive. Immediately on arriving in the city we were surrounded by the Mormons and taken to a corral, and they there commenced questioning us. Ellis Eames asked the questions and J. Ward Christian [did] the writing. We had not been offered anything to eat, although we had but one scanty meal in four days. They subjected us to an examination for several hours. [They asked first one and then another, questions, and wrote as they pleased. The next day they continued their questions for several hours.] The emigrants were not all together during the examinations of this day. After they had got through questioning us, they asked myself and Mr. Baise to sign what they had written, J. Ward Christian read the document, and we affixed our names thereto. I have read the statement published in the Los Angeles Star of October 31, 1857, over my signature, Messrs. Baise, Bledsoe and Tannehill, and say, that I never signed that statement; that the statement read to me by Christian, and which I signed without reading it myself, was altogether different from the published statement which is unqualifiedly false.

I have read the statement made by Mr. Honea, who came in with us, which was published in the Los Angeles Star of October 27, 1857, and that statement is true and not exaggerated.

I have no hesitation in saying, that from my knowledge and belief, the late horrible massacre and robberies, perpetrated upon emigrant trains in Utah Territory, were committed by the Mormons and Indians under Mormon influence.
WILLIAM WEBB,    
Subscribed and sworn to before me, this second day of November, a.d. 1857.
W. G. DRYDEN, County Judge.    

We have received affidavits to the above effect, attested by Mr. M. Katz, notary public, San Bernardino, from Messrs W. H. Tannehill and Isaiah Baise.

(under construction)



Note: Additional transcription pending -- courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher.


 



Vol. VIII.                            San Francisco, November 12, 1857.                            No. 31.


Letter  from  San Bernardino.
_______

The Mormon-Indian Outrages on the Plains.
_______

(FROM A REGULAR CORRESPONDENT.)
_______

SAN BERNARDINO, CAL, Nov 1st, 1857.
Editor of The Bulletin: -- For the last four weeks, the citizens of our county have been more or less excited, from time to time, on the receipt of additional news from the plains. In my last, dated 18th October, I gave you an interesting narrative by Mr. S. B. Honea. (Our correspondent's letter only reached us last night. Mr. Honea's statement was anticipared in the Bulletin of 27th October, where full details of the matter told by him, were given in the words of Mr. Powers and Mr. Warn, and partly from Mr. Honea himself -- Ed. Bulletin.) I had no time to give the detailed statement of affairs, which occurred from time to time, upon the Plains, as but a few moments was allowed me before the departure of the last conveyance to the steamer. Since that time, I have been as far out as 65 miles on the emigrant road, in company with Mr. M. Rabbitt, with a wagon load of provisions, subscribed by our independent citizens for the relief of suffering emigrants who were so cruelly mal-treated and robbed by the Mormons, and their allies, the Indians. We sent another wagon load of provisions out, which preceded us six days, and met the emigrant train near the last crossing of the Mohave.

To do justice to our Mormon neighbors, I must say, that on the arrival of nine men who came in on foot from Cottonwood springs, a distance of 250 miles from this place, to solicit immediate relief for those remaining with their families, some of the Mormons thought this a good opportunity to redeem their characters by sending out a small portion of provisions to their relief. This was done, and two or three of their men went with it, and on meeting the first divisions of the train which was some 30 or 40 miles in advance of the other part of the train, Mr. Van Luven, J. H. Brook, and Peter Brown, who were Americans, distributed their load to the suffers gratis. The Mormons, Mr. Daley and Whipple, gave out a portion of their load upon the same terms; but the Mormons proceeded to the second division, and there sold the balance of their load at the following moderate prices: flour 8c, sugar 20c, coffee 20c, tobacco 75c per plug, &c., thus realizing a handsome profit off what they sold, although the main part of their load was given by the merchants and others bot of their fraternity. I mention this to show that their avarice cannot be satisfied, even if they have to suck the heart's blood of their victims.

I found the most of the people if this train short of provisions, enjoying keen appetites, and a determination to be revenged on the Mormon clique for the injuries they have received at their hands. I need not extend my remarks, as the statements of the gentlemen of this train will suffice to convince all candid persons that the Mormons are the leaders and participants in those foul outrages practiced upon our fellow countrymen. In addition to the statements given by Mr. S. B. Honea, of this company, (given in full in our correspondent's letter of 18th of October, and briefly mentioned in the Bulletin of October 27th.) I enclose the following statement of Mr. Geo. B. Davis, of Arkansas.

Mr. Davis says, that during his stay in Salt Lake City, of four days, he found the Mormons very hostile to the government, and also against the emigrants who were on their way to California. The Mormons made no secrecy of their intentions; they declared that the U. S. troops should never enter their cities or settlements, and that if they did enter, they would fire their cities, and lay it all in ashes, and carry their provisions into the mountains, and then take up their abode with their Indian brethren, and starve Uncle Sam out of the Territory. He proceeded on his way as far as Fillmore, where he was informed by the bishop and the people that they were expecting to hear of the train which had passed that place a few days before to be cut off by the Indians. Because they refused to sell provisions to the emigrants, (according to former instructions of Brigham Young,) a Dutchman became excited, and swore that if he had a good riding horse, he would go back to Salt Lake and shoot Young.

The threats very much incensed the people of Fillmore, and the men collected together with their rifles, etc., to follow the train and cut it to pieces. But according to the bishop's own acknowledgment, he stopped the boys from doing so, by promising to set the Indians upon them, which would save the credit of the Mormons.

The reason why the bishop of Beaver became so communicative, and confided with Mr. Davis, was, because Davis did not oppose them in their religious views and doctrines of polygamy. This encouraged the bishop in his refarious designs, supposing that a little sophistry would convert Mr. Davis to his views, and finally persuade him to stay. He asked Mr. Davis for his only daughter, promised great things, etc.; but Miss Davis remonstrated, as also did her parents at the first intimation of this matter. Mr. Davis saw plainly his true position and the dangers which his family would be subjected to if he stayed there any longer. So he promised the bishop that he would go as far as San Bernardino any way. The bishop advised Mr. Davis, for the respect he had for him and his family not to join the Missouri train, then behind; for it would be dangerous, as all the Mormons were "down on all the Missourians," and he expected that difficulties with them and the Indians would ensue. But, if he could not better himself, he was to drop the two hindmost bows of his wagon, and that would be a sign to the Indians. If Mr. Davis would do so, the bishop would guaranty that not one hair of his head should be hurt. Mr. Davis reviewed the whole matter, and concluded to act the part of a true American, -- to join the train, and share the dangers of the Missourians, and live or die with them.

The company proceeded on their way, and passed through the troubles as described by S. B. Honea. At the Muddy, a number of the members of this train, noticed a striking peculiarity of the Indians which surrounded their wagons. It was noticed that some of the painted Indians had blue, gray, and different colored eyes; they had straight, curly, and fine hair, different materially from the other Indians in this respect. Mr. Davis remarks, also, that a number of those painted Indians had streaks, and spots of white in the creases round their eyes, being in close proximity to the eyeballs; also around and behind the ears it was discovered that the skin of the white men was quite apparant. The painted whites were shy; they did not act with the same freedom and boldness as the aborigines did; but undoubtedly they were the leaders of the band of robbers that drove off the three hundred and twenty-six head of cattle that night.

In respect to the poison story as repirted by J. Ward Christian, and published in various papers in California, it is regarded by every person in this train as a fabrication on the part of the Mormons to clear themselves of suspicion, and to justify the Indians murdering that company of emigrants. Our company camped four days at Corn Creek, where the poisoning is said to have been done, was there ten days after the other company had passed, and at the same time as Wm. Mathews, of San Bernardino, who started the tale, but during our stay, we never heard anything of the poisoning. We used the same water, and between five and six hundred head of our cattle and horses used the same water, yet we discovered no poison, nor heard anything of it, till we got to Parowan, 85 miles from Corn Creek, where Mathews started the story.

Mr. John Hillhouse, another member of the train, and formerly a resident of Salt Lake City, says, that about the month of July last, Mr. Angle, a nephew to Brigham Young, told him in great confidence that Charles C. Rich, late of San Bernardino, brought with him to Salt Lake City, a wagon load of amunition. And also, he was informed by other persons, that Wm. Mathews had a wagon load of gun-powder when he arrived at Salt Lake City, last spring, for the purpose of carrying on war with Uncle Sam.

(Here our correspondent gives a long list of persons, fellow travelers with S. B. Hones, who signed a certificate to the effect that the statements of Mr. Honea were true, and who endorse the same. Our correspondent continues.)

In addition to the above, many others of this company would endorse these statements, but are absent at present. This train consisted of seventy-one souls; Men, 22, women 17; children, 32. The second division of this train, under the supervision of Capt. Nicholas Turner, of Missouri, is expected to arrive here in the course of five or six days. It consists of ten men, five women, and fourteen children.

I also enclose the affidavit of Mr. John Aikin, for the benefit of the public. (This affidavit is published elsewhere in full. -- Ed. Bulletin.)   PILGRIM.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                            San Francisco, Thurs., November 12, 1857.                            No. ?

 

(under construction)


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, November 14, 1857.                         No. 27.



Affairs in Utah.

From circumstances which have lately transpired on the plains of which we have heretofore given full particulars, as well as from the threatening attitude assumed by the authorities of Utah Territory towards the Government of the United States, the attention of the people of the entire Union is directed towards the movements of the leaders of the Mormon people. To place, in a full and fair light the sentiments of those leaders before our readers, we devote to-day a large space to speeches delivered by President Brigham Young, wherein he talks pretty plainly of his intentions, and fully lays down the course of policy to be pursued by his followers, in the event of the arrival among them of that portion of the army detailed for service in Utah. From such teaching, it is plain, that before this time, a collision will have occurred between the people and the troops for the entry of troops upon any portion of that Territory is held to be a cause of war. The result must be deplored by every friend of humanity. Its immediate consequence may be the defeat of the small force known to be on its way thither but it will ultimately cost an immense sacrifice of human life. The position assumed by Brother Brigham is a monstrous outrage upon common sense, as well as a heartless cruelty upon the people who follow his commands. The President has given instructions to the army, that no interference shall be attempted with the people, in any respect whatever. They have the rights of all Americans, of which no power can deprive them. They are secure in their religion in their liberty, in their property all that is required of them is, that they shall be obedient to the laws of the United States. And to have these respected, and to protect the officers of the Government in the execution of their duty, to see that no obstacle is placed in the way of its discharge that they are free from annoyance, insult or persecution, a small force has been sent to accompany them. Yet these troops are to be met by armed bands their march to be stopped by the attacks of armed savages in league with the Mormon authorities, and if they should be able to withstand this terrible onslaught, and make good their way into the Saintly City, then the Destroying Angels are to be let loose, and the work of destruction be carried out till not a vestige of habitation or culture be left throughout the Territory. The people are ordered to sacrifice themselves to face the rigors of winter, endure hardships as famine, rather than allow the troops of the Government to occupy their Territory. And yet we find the people of the Territory not only acquiescing in the ruthless mandates of their rulers, but even joyfully applauding them. Surely this is the very madness of fanaticism. It is deeply to be deplored to find men so wholly given up to work out the will of those audacious despots who rule them with a rod of iron, as not only to brave the power of the Republic, to rush on certain destruction but with incendiary hand to apply the torch to their own property, and burn and lay waste the whole country, so that those whom they consider their enemies my perish in the unhospitable waste. And all this, for merely imaginary evils; but in reality that the power and authority of their rulers may be protracted and consolidated. This is the political enigma of the age the world in astonishment, will await its solution.

We also give to-day the proceedings of the rulers of Utah, on the occasion of the visit to Salt Lake City of Capt. Van Vliet, the Quartermaster of Col. Johnson's command. It is copied from their organ, the Deseret News.

(under construction)




Note: Additional transcription pending -- courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher.


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, November 21, 1857.                                 No. ?



Mormonism.

It is fortunate that, notwithstanding the present [financial] distress of the country, the finances of the General Government remain safe, for we much [mistrust] the character and spirit which now [-----ate] Brigham Young and his followers [---- ----- ------] they will not require the [expenditure of] the Government of both money and men. Those who have lived among the Mormons and profess to be familiar with their policy, differ so much in their [---------] as to the course which that people will probably pursue and the kind of reception our troopsm ow on their way there, will meet, that we find it difficult to form any opinion on that subject, and having no very reliable data and amidst so [many] conflicting statements, we can but conjecture how the Mormons [will act in the] approaching crisis [of their existence as a nation].

Of one thing we are sure, the Mormons are earnestly [sincere] in their determination to resist the extention of the policy of the Government in regard to them. -- They will not, without a desperate struggle, permit any to rule over them who are not of their religious faith and their own selection.

It is absurd to regard them as a people who can be easily subjugated. Their [missionaries] are now the most [-------ous] and the most successful on earth. Their abiding trust in their religion and firm conviction of its truth, cannot be questioned by those among us who know how willingly they sacrificed their property and homes in Carson Valley and [confidently] marched to the aid of their Salt Lake leaders and friends. We hardly doubt but that Brigham himself has now almost persuaded himself that he is posessed of supernatural powers. [----- ---- -----] represented to have been easily impressed by the extravagances, so to speak, of religious subjects. Dissolute and [-----er] as he was, upon all religious topics, he was notoriously fanatical, long before his conversion to Mormonism. His long and successful career in deception and [---------my], doubtless has rendered his perception of wrong very obscure, and convinced him that he is more than mortal. He has lied so constantly and for so many years, that he now believes his lies to be true.

Backed by thousands of deluded, brave followers, well supplied with the munitions of war and skilled their use, protected by Nature from invasion on the East, North and South, surrounded by numerous tribes of warlike Indians who are completely subject to his will and incensed against his enemies, he can be made to obey the laws of the U. S. only by the presence of a powerful army, after a long and most expensive contest. War upon the Mormons is also war upon the savages of the plains. They will [hazard] no decisive engagement, but familiar with the they, by guerrilla policy of sudden attack and sudden retreat, [so] protract the contest that the energies and patience of their opponents will be sorely tested. Their leaders know that by exclusion from the rest of the world, they can alone maintain their power and the example of the troops upon the mass of their followers, would certainly not strengthen the delusion under which they now [rule].

We fear that Brigham Young may permit the advance body of our troops to pass the Mormon outposts, that he will then endeavor to dictate terms to the main body -- terms that will not be [acceded] to, and an attempt to force a passage into Utah will then be [------] forcibly resisted. He will advantageously select his position and so entrench his forces in the canyons, that our troops will not, without large reinforcements, effect his defeat. If so, if the soldiers now sent against him are overpowered, their annihilation is almost certain, and upon our own soil the [atrocities] of India will be reenacted. It does seem that the Mormons must now fight or again abandon their homes and seek a new resting place still more remote from the progressive steps of our Christian people. If they now submit to the officers sent to them, their rulers are stripped of their prestige and their power. So dramatically are their rules of morality to those of other religious sects, so [terribly] revolting are their customs to all save themselves, that to exist they must live apart from all other people. Again, too, recent events plainly inform our government that in the Mormons it has an implacable foe, that they must now be made to feel the strength of our people, if land travel between the Pacific and the Atlantic is not in Utah to be entirely stopped.

Doubts upon the question will, however, soon be removed, and surmises can avail nothing. Much depends upon the judgment and discretion of the officer at the head of our troops. Those troops have the entire sympathy of the American people. As American soldiers they will render a good account of themselves against all Mormondom, and if harm befall, a terrible retribution will surely follow.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, December 5, 1857.                                 No. 38.

 

UTAH. -- The San Francisco Herald learns from a gentleman who professes to be acquainted with Utah affairs, that the Mormons can bring into the field seventeen thousand troops. They are represented to be well-armed and well-drilled, and full of Mormon fanaticism. If Brigham Young is determined to give our troops a brush they will obey his orders to a man.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, December 12, 1857.                                 No. 39.

 

MORMON INFERNAL MACHINE. -- We find in the Washington States of the latest date, the following announcement.

We have on hand a singular piece of information respecting a peculiar system of infernal machine with which the Mormons contemplate defending their valleys against the advance of the United States troops. If we understand it aright, it is a kind of land torpedo, but we refrain from particulars until we investigate the affair more thoroughly. Whatever the facts may be of this extraordinary Mormon machine, we shall have it in our power to try it before our readers in a day or two in an authentic form.


Note: It may be only a coincidence, but the Mormon Apostle, John F. Boynton, invented and patented destructive torpedoes for use in warfare, at about this same time.


 



Vol. VIII.                         Los Angeles, Saturday, December 12, 1857.                         No. 31.



Public Meeting.



(under construction)




Note: Additional transcription pending -- courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher.


 



Vol. VIII.                            San Francisco, Wed., December 23, 1857.                            No. 246.



Brigham Young's Tactics.

The course of Brigham Young hereto fore, whenever any outrage has been perpetrated upon government officials or property, has been to make stout denial of all participation or knowledge of these overt acts. Even when his own conduct has so plainly belied his words (as it almost invariably has done) he has always maintained stoutly entire ignorance and innocence of these matters. The crowning act of this gross impudence, this adding of insult to injury, is reported by Mr. Lander, who is attached to Magraw's wagon road party, and who recently arrived in St. Louis on his way to Washington, and gave an interesting statement of the progress of the party, up to the time of its leaving, to the St. Louis Republican. Mr. Lander states, "that Brigham Young had already disclaimed any participation of knowledge of the overt act of burning the supply trains, and the best judges of the Mormon character believe that the leaders of this singular society will continue to endeavor to blind the eyes of the General Government, and put off the day of a stand up fight until the last moment."

This has always been the course pursued by Brigham Young. He denied all knowledge of, or participation in, the brutal murder of Lieut. Gunnison; and his brave companions, when there is no single circumstance connected with massacre that does not point to Young and his band of "Destroying Angels," as the prime movers in the affair. Every other outrage that has been perpetrated upon the government officers and private individuals he has always ignored, when the truth of his statements were entitled to the same degree of credence that would have been his denial of an act of murder performed by his own hand, and that is still graspong the fatal weapon, he standing over the body he has just stricken down, to the very witnesses of the whole transaction, who had beheld him perform the bloody deed. He has denied all knowledge of, or participation in the murder of one hundred and sixty emigrants, men, women and children, last fall. And yet his myrmidoms hovered on the outside, while the butchery was going on, holding constant communication with the Indians, and receiving from them the captive children to help swell the bloating ulcer of Mormonism.

Why did this human hyena, who fills the capacities of Governor and Superintendent of Indian Affairs, take prompt action for the punishment of the Indians, if there was no complicity between him and the tribes? He boasts of his power over these barbarous hordes, and why was it not exercised, instead of welcoming numbers, if not all, of those attached to the band into Salt Lake City, with the most friendly greetings on the part of the inhabitants, immediately after the massacre was performed? Indeed, it may almost be said, that these Indians danced their congratulatory war dance in hellish glee almost within the limits of the town, and Brigham Young and all Mormondom looked on in quiet satisfaction.

It is to be presumed that the course of Mormon policy has been about played out. This independent denial of Young of all knowledge of the burning of the government train, is such an apparant and blackening falsehood, that it will have the effect of permanently sealing the ears of the Administration against the belief in any of his future statements in palliation or excuse of crimes or overt acts of treason. Hos record is at length written up, and he will have to pay the penalty of his many atrocious crimes.

Meanwhile, those of our citizens, who, while they express their abhorence of Mormonism, are busily engaged, in the capacity of newspaper corresponding, in patching up arguments against the right and policy of sending troops to Salt Lake City, to take summary vengeance upon Young and his hosts, if it becomes necessary, if they can reconcile themselves to accept these gospel denials of Young as possessing one grain of truth, may have some reasonable excuse for the course which they are pursuing. If they cannot do so, then we suggest that they expend their tender sympathies upon the orphans and relatives of the band of emigrants who were butchered, last fall, through the instigation of Young, while on their way to become good citizens of California.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



"Our Country -- Always Right, but Right or Wrong, Our Country."

Vol. IV.                                 Placerville, December 26, 1857.                                 No. 41.



Brigham Young...

Brigham Young has addressed a letter to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, ostensibly to render a report of the dealings with the Indians in Utah during the last quarter, but in order to give the Government a piece of his mind. He transmits a draft for $____ to cover the quarter's expenditures, but adds that he has little hope... [remainder of article and attached letter illigible]


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                                 Los Angeles, January 30, 1858.                                 No. 38.

 

A rumor has been current in town for some time, in which we did not a first give credence, the two young men, Thomas and John, men formerly of this neighborhood, [but] who had been confined in Salt Lake City, were murdered on their way to California. The procured guides and interpreters, but when about two day's journey west of Ogden City they were set upon by Indians, and the whole four killed. The interpreters were not molested. We hope his may prove untrue. The Aiken boys were well known in this city and were much respected. Since they left for San Francisco, we had previously [repeatedly?] heard of their death. This time it comes to us on the authority of a man who had the narrative from the interpreters.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                                 Los Angeles, March 4?, 1858.                                 No. 44?

 

A rumor has been The mail from Salt Lake City has not yet arrived here, although it was reported at San Bernardino in the early part of the week. We do not expect, however, to hear anything from the army by the Salt Lake paper.

By the arrival in this city on Monday, of Messrs. Ackermann and Morgan, formerly teamsters in the employ of C. A. Perry & Co., sutlers for the 10th regiment, we have news from that city to the 5th of Feb. These gentlemen arrived at the army headquarters, at Fort Bridger, on the 19th November, and leaving the [trails?], they determined to come to California; but seeing that they could not do so, direct, they persevered in their determination, and endured great privations and hardships. On the 24th December, they reached Great Salt Lake City, where they remained to the 6th February, during which time they were treated in a kind and hospitable manner. -- They had several interviews with Brigham Young, of whom they speak very favorably.

They state that about the 10th January an order was issued by the church, that the people should have boxes made to contain about 150 pounds, to pack their grain in them and bring them to the elders, who would take charge of them and "cache" them in the mountains.

Another order was issued, that a company of 1000 men should hold themselves in readiness to go into the mountains on the 17th February, and cut off supplies coming to the army.

In the meantime, forty wagons loaded with supplies had reached Col. Johnson's command from Fort Laramie. The army was in good health, had plenty of provisions and good tents, and was engaged in rebuilding Fort Bridger.

The authorities of Salt Lake are represented as being still inclined for war. -- Measures are being concerted for defeating the U. S. troops, or, all events, keeping them outside the city till the crops are gathered and secured. This can easily be done, unless force is sent from this side.

There was a rumor current in town for the past two or three days, to the effect that a fight had taken place between the Mormons and the troops, in which the latter were defeated. We do not think the report worthy of credit.

Messrs. Ackermann and Morgan received the following passport from Brigham Young, when about to leave Salt Lake City. The Governor wrote his name on a sheet of paper, which was handed to a clerk, who wrote the form of passport over the signature. -- Thus the passports bear Brigham's signature, although he does not sign them:

UTAH  TERRITORY.

To all whom these presents shall come. --
  Greeting:


Ledowick M. Morgan and Samuel A. Ackermann are hereby permitted to pass freely and safely through the Territory, on their way to California.

Given under my hands, at Great Salt Lake City, U. T., the 5th day of February, 1858.     BRIGHAM YOUNG.
Messrs. Ackermann and Morgan came with the mail rider from Salt Lake City, and encountered no obstacles of any kind on the way. On passing Mountain Meadows, they saw the bones of the murdered emigrants whitening on the plains. A few of the bodies had been buried, but were tore up again by the wild beasts. They met the express party conveying Col. Kane to Salt Lake, but the Gentiles did not know he was in the wagon, as he was covered up in blankets till they had [passed some] three days.

Since the foregoing was written, Mr. Taft has brought the mail from San Bernardino, anticipating the regular delivery at this point, some three or four days. We have [not received] our file of the Deseret News, nor has a copy of it been received in town. But one or two letters were brought by the mail.


Note: The date may actually be March 6th.


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Thurs, March 11, 1858.                            No. 69.



FROM  THE  SOUTHERN  COAST.
______

The Steamer Senator, Capt. Seely, arrived in port last evening, at 6. o'clock, with news from Los Angeles to the 6th instant, and from San Diego to the same date....

From Salt Lake.

The Los Angeles Star of the 6th inst., says: The mail from Salt Lake City has not yet arrived here, although it was reported at San Bernardino in the early part of the week. We do not expect, however, to hear anything from the army by the Salt Lake paper.

By the arrival in this city, on Tuesday, of Messrs. Ackerman and Morgan, formerly teamsters in the employ of C.A. Perry & Co., sutlers for the 10th Regiment, we have news... On the 24th December, they reached Great Salt Lake City, where they remained to the 6th February, during which time they were treated in a kind and hospitable manner. They had several interviews with Brigham Young, of whom they speak very favorably.

They state, that about the 10th January, an order was issued by the church that the people should have boxes made to contain about 150 pounds, to pack their grain in them, and bring them to the Elders, who would take charge of them and "cache" them in the mountains....

The authorities of Salt Lake City are represented as being still inclined for war. Measures are being concerted for defeating the U.S. troops, or at all events, keeping them outside the city till the crops are gathered and secured. This can easily be done, unless a force is sent from this side...

Ackerman and Morgan started for California from Fort Bridger, on the 19th Nov., by the northern route, but got lost and were almost starved in the mountains. Finally they got to a Mormon settlement, where they were taken prisoners and afterwards set free. They went to Salt Lake, staid till the 6th of February, and then came through to San Bernardino with the Mormon mail. The Star says:

Messrs. Ackerman and Morgan came with the mail rider from Salt Lake City, and encountered no obstacles of any kind on the way. On passing Mountain Meadows, they saw the bones of the murdered emigrants whitening on the plains. A few of the bodies had been buried, but were torn up again by the wild beasts. They met the express party conveying Col. Kane to Salt Lake, but the Gentiles did not know he was in the wagon, as he was covered up with blankets, till they had passed some three days....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Tues., April 13, 1858.                            No. 101.



OUR  WASHINGTON  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Washington, March 19, 1858,    
...In [the] discussion of the Army bill the Utah rebellion has been referred incidentally, and the intention of the War Department pretty clearly disclosed. The army will move into Salt Lake City so soon as the reinforcements reach Colonel Johnson, and, if needs be, will march with fixed bayonets.

A  MORMON  WAR  CERTAIN.

The memorial from the Utah Legislature was of a character to disgust Congress, but at the same time it satisfied every one that the Mormons would resist by force, and that the result will be certain destruction to their communuty. The wisest of our counsellors say they see no possible way now to avoid bloodshed. The most energetic and active operations are going on in the various departments of the army with a view to a successful expedition in the spring....

SENATOR  GWIN  ON  THE   INDIAN  MASSACRE.

A sharp discussion occurred to-day between Seantors Gwin and Houston on a resolution intriduced by the former, calling on the Secretary of War for information as to any steps taken by the government to punish the murderers of the one hundred and eighteen emigrants last Fall at Mountain Meadows in Utah. Senator Hiuston, as usual, defended the Indians, and extenuated their conduct on this horrible massacre. If the discussion had not been cut short by the arrival of the House for the consideration of the special order (Kansas,) the discussion would have become exceedingly personal, as Senator Gwin characterized the murder as the most abominable and desperate ever known, and was surprised to learn that the murderers could find an apologist on the floor of the Senate. He advocated the ordering of an expedition from California to chastise the parties concerned in the brutal outrage, otherwise we should have no safety on any of our routes across the continent....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. I.                                 Los Angeles, May 8, 1858.                                 No. 52?

 

[A letter dated Farmington City, sixteen miles north of Salt Lake City, April 4th says]: "We are now ordered to move south of Provo, from the settlements north of Salt Lake City, and that city is also to be vacated and burnt down immediately, in order that Col. Johnson and his men may come in and fulfill the orders of the Government in establishing a military post there. There is a regular break up, and it is going to be rather hard with all. The word generally is, that they intend to locate in San Pete Valley. Gov. Cumming and Colonel Kane are expected in from the soldiers' camp to-day, under an escort of our boys, and I anticipate that some compromise will be made, in order that all shall not have to go away."


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


SOUTHERN  VINEYARD.

Vol. II.                                 Los Angeles, Calif., May 29, 1858.                                 No. 11.



The Federal Government and Utah.

As a citizen and member of the Democratic party of the United States, the nomination and election of the present chief magistrate met with our hearty approval and co-operation. Since we assumed the management of the editorial department of this paper, we have expressed our satisfaction with the policy pursued by the Executive, and have had neither the occasion nor the disposition to find fault.

Fully sensible that the Utah questions is one which presents difficulties of no ordinary kind, we are not disposed to hastily arrive at a conclusion of what is the wisest policy to be pursued by the government, in the prosecution to a settlement of this disagreeable subject.

The news from the East by the fast mail shows that the War Department is taking energetic and efficient measures to solve at an early day this difficulty.

On the other hand there are rumors and reports recently received here from Utah, which perhaps are entitled to some consideration, that a misunderstanding has occurred between Gov. Cummings and Col. Johnson, and that the troops are not to advance, but that they will soon return East.

Unable to perceive why any difficulty should have taken place between the civil and military authorities sent to govern and preserve order in that Territory, we are not disposed to give credit to the report, much less to infer that the President is pursuing a wavering and vacilating course. It is not presumable, that while the President is occupied in providing for the forwarding of men and supply trains from the East, that he is countenancing a movement which must again leave the government of Utah at the mercy of those same persons whose acts have compelled the Federal Government to send an army into the field, and whose obstinacy has obliged that army to suffer the inclemency of a winter in the summits of the Rocky mountains, and who destroyed the few buildings that might have served as a partial shelter to that army from the storms of winter. The people of the United States will demand even if the present congress does not, a rigid investigation into certain transactions that have occurred in Utah, and which have been thus far permitted to sleep in almost forgetfulness.

The massacre of Capt. Gunnison’s party has been laid at the door of the Utah Mormons, and justice requires an investigation that shall either relieve them of the charge, or stamp the cursed deed upon the foreheads of the guilty in letters of blood.

The massacre of the party of emigrants on their way to California in the past year must be enquired into. No sane man, acquainted with the character of Indians, with the testimony at present before the world, will believe that that act, of more than savage barbarity, was perpetrated by Indians. It is beyond the power of credulity to believe that Indians could, or would have done and acted as was reported, by the Mormons, to have been done by the incarnate devils who destroyed that party. The extermination of so large a number of men, without the escape of a solitary individual, is unheard of in Indian warfare. The preservation of the children is unprecedented in the barbarous acts of Indians. The return of those Indians along the highway that they knew was thronged with emigrants; and their undisguised entrance into a populous settlement, with the orphan children as trophies of their bloody deed, is beyond the limits of credence. If it were allowable to admit an impossible case, for argument, we would assume that the plan was concocted and the act performed by the Indians without the aid or knowledge of the Mormons. In which case the whole body of Utah officers, from the Revelator himself, down to the constable of the town most remote from the scene, are guilty of murder in its most revolting form. Not only the officers, but the inhabitants throughout the length and breath of that Territory, are a thousand time more guilty that the Indians who imbued their hands with the blood of our country-men, their wives and their daughters. Months multiplied by months have passed on, and, until the present day no effort has been made by these saints to pursue after, and bring to justice those savages that had so cruelly murdered scores of their fellow citizens, and left the mutilated bodies of women to fester in the mid-day sun. The inhabitants of Utah cannot plead in excuse that the Indians were unknown, or that they were too numerous or powerful to be brought to justice, because they were known, and there are no mighty bands of Indians in that Territory, while there are resident Mormons in almost every Indian village in Utah. Neither was it because the Mormons felt themselves too weak to make the attempt; for almost immediately after that event they openly challenged and defied the combined civil and military powers of the United States. Instead then of exerting themselves to avenge the horrid deed, they held up their hands before High Heaven, and shouted Hallelujah, rejoicing over the diabolical act.

The only conclusion at which any mind controlled by sound reason, can arrive, under the circumstances and the testimony thus far divulged, is that this unparalleled crime of fratricide was committed by the Mormons. And, we ask, shall this stigma be permitted to settle down and rest upon the people of America? Will the Government and the people of the United States follow the example of Brigham Young and the people of Utah; and suffer a crime of such enormity to attach itself to the skirts of our fellow-citizens, without an effort to clear up this charge.

It was charged at the time of the massacre, that it was the work of Mormons. The Mormons themselves knew that the circumstances were such as would cause the crime to be imputed to them by the unprejudiced and impartial (?) of their fellow citizens of the United States.

This party of emigrants were murdered between the 12th and 15th of September last, and Mormon, J. Ward Christian, then a resident of San Bernardino, in communicating the circumstances, to the Los Angeles Star, writes as follows:

(see original article in LA paper)

From the foregoing extracts, although written by a Mormon, and for the purpose of publication, we affirm that there is sufficient proof to satisfy every unprejudiced mind conversant with Indian character, that the deed was never performed by Indians. Further, we state with full confidence, that the emigrants knew at the time, that the attacking force was Mormon. No body of Americans, surrounded and reduced to such extremities, by enraged and savage Indians, would ever have thought of sending a little girl with a flag of truce, and more especially when these men were from Arkansas, where every inhabitant is familiar with the character of the Indian. But knowing them to be Mormons, and partly American, and not believing that they had lost all feelings of humanity, the would, in a case of extremity, make use of such a messenger as would be most likely to awaken their sympathy.

If the murderers had been Indians, they never would have killed, on the field, all [the] females. This party consisted almost entirely of families, and there must have been as many or more young women as there were infants. Indians would not have killed these; but would have carried them off as captives. Neither would they have preserved the infant children. The American history is full of instances where the brains of the infant have been dashed out in the presence of the parent, while the mother has been led into captivity. On the contrary, if they were Mormons, there were strong reasons that would urge them to adopt the course pursued by those murderers. The children would soon be of service to them. They would in a few years be men and women, and Mormons; while they could not spare the life of a grown person or youth, no, not even the young and lovely females, because the risk of subsequent exposure and detection of participation in the harrowing deed, was too imminent.

This article has already exceeded our usual limits, or we would transcribe from the Star the statement made by Messrs. Powers and Warn, published in that paper in October last. These men were the first, except Mormons, that passed along the road after the massacre, and relate many circumstances that fix, in the most positive manner, the complicity of the Mormons in that tragedy.

We saw and conversed with Mr. Powers and Mr. Warn, of their arrival in this city, and it was at that time our deliberate opinion derived not from prejudice, but from the testimony that there were no Indians engaged in the affair, but that those Indians seen on the road by the men named above, were Mormons in disguise.

Both the editorials and the statements made in the Star at the time, imputed the act to the direct agency of the Mormons. A public meeting was held in this place, at which resolutions were passed declaring the conviction that the atrocious act was perpetrated by the Mormons and their allies, and this belief was published to the world.

The representatives of the people of the entire Union, as well as those of the inhabitants of California, saw and read the history of this astounding crime, and what have they done or proposed in the premises? We have not seen that the subject has been urged upon, or has been brought up in Congress, save and except by Mr. Gwin. And the matter was not such as that, in his unaided hands, Congress could be induced to take any effective action.

That there has been a positive coldness, excited only to a slight lukewarmness, manifested in Congress by the California delegation, we think cannot be denied.

That hundreds of our fellow-citizens, while journeying over the domain of the people, should be so wantonly murdered, whether by Indians or Mormons, more than eight months since, and no steps taken either by the authorities of the Territory where it was committed, or by the Federal Government to investigate the occurrence, is an outrage upon humanity, and a scandal to ourselves and the Government.

Had this outrage been committed by the Chinese, or the cannibals of the Southern ocean, the halls of Congress would have echoed back in indignation of the representative of an incensed people, and our own California delegation would have cried for vengeance, and not have ceased until the manes of their fellow-countrymen had been appeased by an offering of blood, which should have satiated the god of justice.

There is no conceivable method by which these subjects can be investigated in Utah, but by the presence of an army which shall over awe the guilty, and protect those who would aid and assist in discovering the perpetrators. If they were Indians, [there] is greater reason for bringing home the act to them, as, until this is done, the onus must rest on the Mormons. Justice, as well as our own good name, requires that they should not rest under so foul an imputation. But if they are guilty, the blood of our unburied sister, has ascended up to Heaven, and is demanding retribution.

If the performers in this outrageous tragedy were whites who masked themselves as Indians, that their darkened countenances might approximate the blackness of the crime which they committed, let them be pursued by long-suffering justice, until the vital air we breathe shall not circulate through the nostrils of one of the wretches; let them be forever hung upon the highest peaks of the overhanging mountains; let their bodies ever remain suspended in the frigid atmosphere of the mountain tops, as an example from ocean to ocean of retributive justice, and a warning to future and unborn generations.


Note: Additional transcription pending, courtesy of Will Bagley and Burr Fancher.


 


Vol. VI.                               San Francisco, Wed., July 21, 1858.                                 No. 88.



Letter from the Army of Utah.
________

Matters in Mormondom.
________

(FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.)
________

CAMP OF THE ARMY OF UTAH.    
Near Fort Bridger, W. T., June 2, 1858.      
Believing that at no other point in the wide expanse of the continent would so much of interest centre during the present summer as here, I have transferred myself and pen to this distant and desolate region, whence I shall advise the Bulletin of the operations of the army in its efforts to subdue the Mormon hierarchy as often as opportunity to send it a letter presents itself -- exceeding doubtful, however, whether the Mormon system of espionage will not prove entirely too perfect to enable my communications to reach their destinations....

(James W. Simonton's July, 1858 "Special Correspondence" to the
San Francisco Bulletin has been moved to
a supplementary web-page)



Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VI.                                 San Francisco, Sat., Aug. 12, 1858.                                 No. 107.



Mormon Agency in Last Year’s Massacre at
Mountain Meadows.

A correspondent of the Southern Vineyard, writing from San Bernardino, gives and account of the part the Mormons played in the massacre last year of a large body of emigrants bound for California. He says:

The Mormons have sworn vengeance against the people of San Bernardino, and they say they have never sold their land, but only took what the devil saw fit to give them, and they intend to make them pay tribute to the Lord by Daniting them, as they did the men, women and children at the Mountain Meadows last fall, who I am credibly informed, were massacred in the following manner:

The Mormons armed a party of Indians, and instructed them at what place to attack the doomed emigrants. The Indians obeyed council, but the men of the train, having their women and children by their sides, and all at stake, fought manfully; and my informant says they could have fought all the way to California had it not been for a fiendish Mormon Danite, who had been sent to instruct the Indians how to manage. Seeing that the Indians of themselves could not complete the hellish work, he availed himself of the opportunity of hoisting a white flag, and went into the camp of the emigrants, where, I am informed, that, after three days' fighting, he found but two of the men of the train wounded. He stated to the emigrants that he heard of their trouble, and had come to assist them, and advised them to lay down their arms, assuring them that this would be the most certain way to let the Indians know that they were for peace, and assuring them that he would see the Indians, and all would be right. At this time another Mormon came into camp and stated that the Indians had said, that if the emigrants would lay down their arms, they, the Indians, would lay down theirs also, and would come into camp and shake hands and be friends. At length these propositions were assented to by the doomed emigrants. Upon the two Mormon fiends agreeing to take care of the arms and not let the Indians get hold of them, which was readily assented to by the two fiends; a signal was then given, and the Indians came into camp, unarmed, in company with fourteen Mormons, who stated to the emigrants that all was right. In a few moments, when all was in readiness, a signal was given, and the arms of the ill-fated Americans were in the hands of their enemies, while at the same time another party of Indians, headed by Danite fiends, rushed into camp. Until this moment the unfortunate men had some hope; but seeing this, the hardy sons of liberty cried -- "Father, into thy care and keeping we commend our wives and our children, our own flesh and blood; our own countrymen have betrayed us."

The men of the train were then requested to go out from the camp some three or four hundred yards, as the Mormons said, to hold a council. It was with some difficulty that the old men could be induced to go, but suffice it to say, they went; and there it is that we see the bones of our countrymen lie bleaching in the northern blast! But does the hellish deed stop here? No. What next? That which followed can be more easily imagined than written or told! Suffice to say, that one William H. Dame, Colonel of Iron Military District, ordered the women to be stripped, which was done. He then, as William Matthews, formerly of San Bernardino, said, found them all diseased, and it was no harm to kill them.

I have also been informed that one David Carter was the means of saving the lives of the company of emigrants known as Captain Duke and Turner's train, who were robbed of all their stock last fall. Nephi Johnson was the man who commanded the Indians and Mormons on that occasion, and was the man who borrowed the pistol, and ran off the stock.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. X                            San Francisco, Fri., August 13, 1858.                            No. 221.



A New Version of the
Mountain Meadow Massacre.

A correspondent of the Los Angeles Vineyard, writing from San Bernardino, gives the following statement of the manner in which the Mountain Meadow massacre was per[etrated, his information having been obtained from a Salt Lake City Mormon:

The Mormons armed a party of Indians, and instructed them at what place to attack the doomed emigrants. The Indians obeyed council, but the men of the train, having their women and children by their sides, and all at stake, fought manfully; and my informant says they could have fought all the way to California, had it not been for a fiendish Mormon Danite who had been sent to instruct the Indians how to manage.

Seeing that the Indians of themselves could not complete the hellish work, he availed himself of the opportunity of hoisting a white flag, and went into the camp of the emigrants, where, I am informed, that, after three days' fighting, he found but two of the men of the train wounded. He stated to the emigrants that he heard of their trouble, and had come to assist them, and advised them to lay down their arms, assuring them that this would be the most certain way to let the Indians know that they were for peace, and assuring them that he would see the Indians, and all would be right. At this time another Mormon came into camp and stated that the Indians had said, that if the emigrants would lay down their arms, they, the Indians, would lay down theirs also, and would come into camp and shake hands and be friends. At length these propositions were assented to by the doomed emigrants. Upon the two Mormon fiends agreeing to take care of the arms and not let the Indians get hold of them, which was readily assented to by the two fiends; a signal was then given, and the Indians came into camp, unarmed, in company with fourteen Mormons, who stated to the emigrants that all was right. In a few moments, when all was in readiness, a signal was given, and the arms of the ill-fated Americans were in the hands of their enemies, while at the same time another party of Indians, headed by Danite fiends, rushed into camp. Until this moment the unfortunate men had some hope; but seeing this, the hardy sons of liberty cried -- "Father, into thy care and keeping we commend our wives and our children, our own flesh and blood; our own countrymen have betrayed us."

The men of the train were then requested to go out from the camp some three or four hundred yards, as the Mormons said, to hold a council. It was with some difficulty that the old men could be induced to go, but suffice it to say, they went; and there it is that we see the bones of our countrymen lie bleaching in the northern blast! But does the hellish deed stop here? No. What next? That which followed can be more easily imagined than written or told! Suffice to say, that one William H. Dame, Colonel of Iron Military District, ordered the women to be stripped, which was done. He then, as William Matthews, formerly of San Bernardino, said, found them all diseased, and it was no harm to kill them.


Note: Other reprints of the Vineyard report add this final line: "I have also been informed that one David Carter was the means of saving the lives of the company of emigrants known as Captain Duke and Turner's train, who were robbed of all their stock last fall. Nephi Johnson was the man who commanded the Indians and Mormons on that occasion, and was the man who borrowed the pistol, and ran off the stock."


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Sun., August 29, 1858.                            No. 237.



Movements of the Army -- The Mormons.

Gen. Johnston entered Salt Lake City of the 26th ult. Provo was still the rallying point of the Mormons, though they had been earnestly invited to return and take possession of their deserted homes.

The army was ordered not to leave the ranks when entering Salt Lake city; the herds should not be allowed to trespass on the fields, and good order should be maintained.

The most peaceful feelings were said to prevail at Salt Lake city between Brigham Young and the United States Peace Commissioners, between whom a daily communication was kept up.

Brigham Young had returned to Salt Lake city, and the heads of the church and their followers were following. Reports of gold deposits in the vicinity of St. Varian's Fort were made by some of the returning teamsters, but not much credit was given them. Gen. Johnston had passed through the city, and encamped thirty miles beyond. Brigham Young was anxious to be tried for tresason, provided the jury should consist of Mormons only.

Doctor Forney, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Utah, informs the Interior Department that fifteen children belonging to the train of emigrants who were murdered at Sweet Water [sic], had been found and ransomed by the whites from the Indians. Early in June four Germans were murdered eighty miles from Salt Lake city, supposed by the Indians, who, it was reported, were creating difficulties on the southern route to California. Dr. F. intended visiting them with a view to their pacification.

The very latest accounts received in New York from Utah stated that Governor Cumming had alienated the good will of his colleagues; that he has affiliated with the leading Mormons, and that the mails are openly tampered with while passing through Salt Lake city Post Office, without remonstrance from the Governor.


Note: The misidentification of Mountain Meadows as "Sweet Water" appears to have originated in the telegraphic news release from Washington, D.C. on July 31st. The Missouri Republican of August 02, 1858 carried the same report.


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Tues., September 7, 1858.                            No. 246.



OUR   PLACERVILLE  CORRESPONDENT.
_____

Placerville, Sept. 5, 1858,    
To-day at 11 o'clock, A. M., the long delayed Salt Lake mail stage arrived, and with it the disheartening intelligence that the mail coach, which left Salt Lake on the 16th of August, in charge of John Mayfield and others, has been plundered and destroyed by the Indians....

From reliable information it appears that this whole business has been brought about through the bungling mismanagement and inefficiency of Dr. Jacob Forney, the Indian Agent at Salt Lake. He, it seems, had made repeated promises to go out and meet the Shoshones, for the purpose of making a treaty with them. This, that functionary persistently neglected to do, and the Indians, not being the most patient race in the world, finally resolved to wreak their vengeance on the mail carriers.

The evil is not irreparable, however, and by prompt action on the part of the Agent, the trouble might be settled without another hostile demonstration....   W. F. S.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Tues., September 14, 1858.                            No. 253.



Arrival of the Overland Mail.

...Brigham Young and Governor Cummings appear to have entered into a joint spiritual and temporal copartnership. Whether it extends to the harem of the prophet or not, does not appear. As to the report about the baptism and conversion of Cummings to the Mormon faith, we place little reliance upon it, although it is plain to be seen that he has pursued a temporising course since his arrival in the Mormon country, which, taken in connection with collateral circumstances, warrants the belief, that he looks forward to the day when he may represent the State of Utah in the U. S. Senate. To accomplish this end, the conciliation of the Mormon community is an all important consideration, and he evidently will not stop at any thing that may be required of him, to accomplish that result. Everything goes to prove that this is his object, and his line of policy. His case furnishes another sad example of the degeneracy of the age we live in, when so-called statesmanship is bought by political cunning and trickery.

Dr. Forney, who has been acting as Indian Agent, has justly incurred the displeasure of all parties, and, it is stated, is about to resign. If all accounts speak true, his resignation will prove a happy deliverance to the people of the whole Union, who are interested in opening the mail routes across the continent, and will go far toward settling all Indian troubles, which have been wholly attributed to his conduct, whether justly so or not we do not pretend to say....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Thurs., September 23, 1858.                            No. 262.



OUR  SPECIAL  SALT LAKE  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Salt Lake City, Sept. 5, 1858,    
I have just returned from Camp Floyd, the headquarters of the great Army of Utah, in company with General Jeff Hunt, of San Berardino notoriety. We were very kindly received by the commanding officer, General Johnson....

Doctor Forney, Superintendent Indian Affairs, goes out in a company with the troops with presents, &c. Mr. J. S. Dodge, the new Indian Agent, has arrived from St. Joseph. He goes out to Carson Valley to establish a Reservation at that point. It is the intention of Gen. Johnson to establish, as early as possible, in the spring, a permanent post at the same point on the Humboldt, for the protection of the mail and emigration. Also a post on the southern route to San Bernardino....

There is at present some difficulty between the inhabitants of Spanish Fork and the Superintendent of Indian Affairs in regard to the location of a Reservation at that point; the matter is to be referred to the department at Washington.

Dr. Forney proposes leaving for Washington about Nov. 5 via California, taking the children of the party that was massacred (numbering 180) last year, on their way to California, at a point called Mountain Meadows....


Note: The above article was reprinted in the Alta California of the following day, as well.


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Mon., October 18, 1858.                            No. 286.



Letter from Dr. Forney Indian Agent from Utah.

Humboldt Valley,    
500 miles west of Salt Lake City,   
Oct. 8, 1858.    
Editors Alta: -- This morning the Weekly Alta California was handed to me containing a letter dated Placerville, Sept. 5, signed W. F. S. The whole is a tissue of falsehoods. The letter is false both in regard to myself and the Indians living on the Humboldt. I left Salt Lake City Sept. 12th, to visit the Indians on the Humboldt; have seen five chiefs, and some 500 Indians. From them and the whites I have learned sufficient to satisfy me that if the mail was molested at all, it was done by Nannac Indians from Oregon.

I was willing, and am still, to render the mail all the assistance in my power. I know the contractor, and consider him a gentleman, being from my own State, Pennsylvania. When the first mail arrived in Salt Lake City, I saw the conductor, who informed me that if he had some few presents it might prove advantageous. I at once gave him a few. The moment I heard of the mail difficulties, I took prompt steps to have the road safe to all travelers. Got ready without delay to visit the Humboldt valley. I have seen the Indians, and am of the opinion that the road is perfectly safe.

I will have no trouble when I get to Salt Lake City, to place my official character beyond the reach of any and all malicious and cowardly scoundrels. The stage must leave. I will, when I get time, give you a full statement of the mail difficulties, and Indians on the Humboldt. Have the kindness to publish this hasty line.

I remain, very respectfully yours, &c.
J. Forney,        
Sup't. Indian Affairs, U. T.        


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. X.                            San Francisco, Fri., October 22, 1858.                            No. 290.



Dr. Forney and our Placerville Correspondent.

Placerville, October 19, 1858,    
Editors Alta: -- In your issue of the 18th appears a letter from Doctor Forney, the U.S. Indian Agent for Utah, in which he denies certain statements which were made against his official conduct, in my communication to the Alta on the 5th of September last. The Doctor's denial is couched in such language that it apparently calls in question my veracity, as a correspondent for the Alta, and I therefore submit the subjoined affidavit, to show that I had authority for what I have written. Personally I am unacquainted with Doctor Forney; have never seen him in my life, and have no desire or motive to injure his reputation. My means of information concerning him were obtained from the mail carriers and Salt Lake stage passengers, and if they misrepresented his conduct, the fault is none of mine; but it is notorious here, that at the time the complained of statements were made, the overland stage drivers, the passengers, the letter writers from the way stations, and everybody connected with the central route, complained loudly against the Indian Agent for neglect of duty, and all agreed that his carelessness was the main cause of the Indian troubles. Whether that gentleman was censurable I know not, but I gave the facts as I obtained them, and without further ado, I shall submit the following affidavit.   Yours,   W. F. S.



Placerville City,
El Dorado County, } State of California.
Oct. 19th, 1858.
This day, personally appeared before me, a Justice of the Peace in and for said county, at my office in Placerville, Thomas Condon, who being by me duly sworn, says that during the months of August and September, 1858, he was in the employ of George Chorpenning & Co., and was engaged in carrying the mails on the overland route between the cities of Placerville and Salt Lake, and that while thus engaged, he has frequently heard people, both at Salt Lake City and along the above named mail route, murmuring against Doctor Forney, the United States Indian Agent, for culpable neglect of his official duties; that he, the affiant, has repeatedly heard both white men and Indians along said route make the above complaint, that at the time the Indians attacked the mail party and destroyed the mails in charge of Mayfield, in August last, it was generally believed and asserted by the people at the various mail stations along the route, that the hostile demonstration had been occasioned by the Agent's failing to fulfil his promises to the Indians   Thos. Condon.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 19th day of October, 1858.   John Bush,
                            Justice of the Peace.

Without any affidavit to support the position of our Placerville correspondent, we would mention that we had frequently heard from reliable persons crossing the plains that Doctor Forney had repeatedly sent word by parties passing through the Indian country, both west and south of Salt Lake, that he would, at a certain time, be among them with presents as compensation for the various parties travelling through their lands, who, as the Indians say "eat their grass, drink their water, burn their wood, and kill their game."

The Indians, like children, expected that at the time specified, the agent of their great father at Washington would be among them, and as he did not come, they told subsequent passengers that "white man lied" -- the Agent had not come and brought presents. It may all appear very simple to say to the untutored savage that they will receive their presents at a certain time, and not suppose they would think anything about it if they did not come, but patiently wait week after week and yet no Agent arrived. They had good cause to say "the white man lied," and on account of this delay all the trouble ensued.

We have, heretofore, spoken editorially of the necessity upon the part of our government of taking action and prompt measures to keep the Indians quiet along the Overland Mail routes, and if after the government has tried to do so, as in this case, trouble ensues in consequence of any fault of the agents sent, let the blame and responsibility fall on such agents' shoulders. A thorough investigation into the conduct of Forney should be had, and if to blame, let him receive the condemnation such negligence deserves.



THE INDIAN TROUBLES A HUMBUG. -- A detachment of forty-one men of the First Dragoons, under command of Captain Davidson, with Lieut. and Adjutant Ogle, left Fort Tejon September 22d, for San Bernardino, and the headwaters of the Mohave river, in consequence of reports of large numbers of hostile Indians being in, around, through and about that region.

The command reached San Bernardino the fifth day from Tejon; next crossed the mountains east of San Bernardino, by the saw-mills; traveled down the Mohave two days; saw no Indians, or signs of Indians having lived on or camped on that stream or its tributaries for years.

The respectable portion of the citizens of San Bernardino, when questioned as to Indian depredatoons, answer "humbug." Mormons still start from that point for Salt Lake, and horses will be stolen....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VII.                                 San Francisco, October 29, 1858.                                 No. 19.



Letter from Great Salt Lake.
______

(FROM  OUR  OWN  CORRESPONDENT.)
______

GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, U. T.,    
Monday, Oct. 11, 1858.   

Opening of the U. S. District Court --
Address of Judge Sinclair.

The Fall Term of the U. S. District Court, in this, the Third Judicial District of the Territory, commenced on Monday last, 4th October. The grand and petit juries were, however, both adjourned until the first Monday in November next, in consequence, as it is understood, of the absence of the U. S. District Attorney for the

After empanneling the juries and adjourning them, as above stated, the Judge -- the Hon. C. E. Sinclair -- delivered the following eloquent and fitting address to the members of the bar, present:...

(under construction)

The Late Indian Outrage on Mormon Women.

I reported in a former communication that three Utah Indians had most brutally outraged a Mormon woman and her daughter, near Spanish Fork settlement, on the 10th of last month. The affair, I fear, will result in a serious war with the Ute nation. Dr. Hurt, the Indian Agent for that tribe, returned to this city on Wednesday last, bringing with him two of the offenders under arrest. Through the politeness of Gov. Cumming I have ontained the particulars of their arrest from the official correspondence on the subject.

Assembly of Indian Chiefs -- Refusal to Deliver up the Perpetrators.

Immediately upon the receipt of the news here, in the absence of Dr. Forney, the Superintendant of Indian Affairs, instructed Agent Hurt to proceed without delay to the Indian Reserve at Spanish Fork, assemble the chiefs of the Ute nation in ciuncil, and demand of them the delivery of the perpetrators of the crime for trial. Dr. Hurt having convened a council of the chiefs on the subject, they, after considerable discussion, finally told him that they were perfectly willing to deliver them up, if he would take them out and shoot them immediately; but that they were unwilling that they should be "tied" (confined,) as they "did not understand tying." They decided thus, under the impression that the little girl had died from the effects of violence committed upon her; but, discovering soon after that the child was still living, they refused to deliver them up at all -- asserting that the Mormons had often violated their women, and reciting as a palliation of the offence all the wrongs which the Mormons had comitted upon the Americans.

Indians Surprised by a U. S. Armed Force -- The Chief Pintuts Killed.

Having heard that the offenders were at this time visiting the Army at Camp Floyd, Dr. Hurt dispatched an officer thither with a warrant for their arrest, hoping to catch them there without any trouble, but this officer being rather dilatory, they heard of the proceedings about the be instituted in the matter, and returned to their tribe at the farm. The Doctor then sent an express to the Governor for further instructions; and acting under the instructions received he again made a demand upon the tribe for the delivery of the offenders. The Indians, however, persisted in their refusal; and Dr. Hurt thereupon went to Camp Floyd, procured a military posse, consisting of 100 dragoons and 180 infantry, and by a foreced march reached the Indian farm by daylight, on the morning of the 2nd October, hoping to take the Indians by surprise, surround them and thus secure the offenders.

The Indians, meanwhile, had all left the farm and gone into the mountains, with the exception of a few, including the chiefs Pintuts and Sintic. These Indians finding themselves surrounded by soldiers, became very much alarmed and attempted to escape. Unfortunately, Pintuts lost his life in the attempt. A dragoon having pursued him and finding that he could not stop him either by hailing or by firing his pistol in the air, shot him, killing him instantly. All the others were secured and detained until the offenders -- boys about 18 years of age, named Mose and Looking-glass -- were delivered up.... The alleged criminals have been confined in the penitentiary until the witnesses in the case can be procured, when they will be examined before Judge Sinclair in this city....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VII.                                 San Francisco, December 21, 1858.                                 No. 63.



Letter from Great Salt Lake City.
______

(FROM  OUR  OWN  CORRESPONDENT.)

GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, U. T.,    
Monday, November 29, 1858.   

Meeting of the U. S. District Court --
The Judge's Charge to the Grand Jury.

The U. S. District Court met on Monday last, fully organized to prosecute such business as might arise before it. The clerk having read the journal of the Court, the Judge read an able and fitting charge to the Grand Jury, after they had been duly empanneled and sworn. An advance copy of this charge I forwarded to you in my last communication. (See Bulletin of the 9th December.) That copy was slightly incorrect in some few of the expressions made by the Judge. The imperfections, however, are fortunately not very material and do not affect the sense of the document.

Composition of a Grand Jury at Salt Lake City.

The following list of the names of the jurors will exhibit the composition of the Grand Jury. Most of the Mormons are polygamists, as I am informed.

Eleazer Miller, forman -- polygamist. (He is the man who first baptized Brigham Young...)
A. B. Miller, Gentile merchant.
Stephen B. Rose, Mormon.
Ormus E. Bates, Mormon.
John B. Kimball, Mormon.
B. F. Pemdleton, Mormon.
George Stringham, Mormon.
A. B. Miller, Gentile merchant.
Ezekiel Lee, Mormon.
Stephen Luce, Mormon.
Harrison Severe, Mormon.
H. Cabot, Gentile merchant.
G. A. Neal, Mormon.
C. L. Craig, Gentile -- Indian Agent.
A. H. Raleigh, Mormon.
J. C. Campbell, Gentile.
Elias Perry, Gentile merchant.
John Kerr, Gentile.
D. W. Bayliss, Gentile -- watch-maker.
D. H. Beck, Gentile -- saddler.

It will be perceived that the Mormons have a majority of one on the Grand Jury. This will be sufficient to defeat the ends of justice. In fact, Brigham Young has a majority in the United States Grand Jury, whose duty it will be to consider the questions of Mormon treason and Mormon polygamy.

Judge Sinclair's charge has had no outward effect upon this people, but every day makes it more apparent that it has created a very strong under-current of bitter feeling against the Gentiles, which the leaders are using every effort to fan into a flame. You need not be surprised to hear of an outbreak before long.

Important Question Arising -- Conflict of
Territorial and United States Authorities.

A most important question, and one which is of vital importance at the present moment, is now under consideration by the Court, and a decision upon it will probably be rendered to-day. It is the question whether the U. S. District Attorney or the Territorial District Attorney (appointed by the Legislature) shall prosecute crimes and offences against the laws and statutes of the Territory, brought for trial before this, the U. S. Court. And, also, whether the U. S. Marshal or the Territorial Marshal shall execute the process of the Court when it is engaged upon the trial of crimes and offences against the laws of the Territory.

If it is decided that the officers of the Court appointed by the United States shall be superseded by those appointed by the Mormon Legislature, then adieu to all justice! These Mormon officers will select a Grand Jury composed entirely of Mormons, and a Mormon Grand Jury would certainly not inquire into the facts of murder or other crimes committed by any of the leaders of the Mormon church; and thus those terrible crimes which have been committed in this Territory, the accounts of which have so shocked the world, would still remain unpunished -- would still remain enveloped in mystery. There are crimes which the laws of this Territory punish; and among these, we must not -- we cannot forget, at least -- the circumstances connected with the massacre, in the fall of 1857, of 119 men, women and children, emigrants on their way to California, committed within the line of Mormon settlements. The facts have not escaped memory that sixteen infants, all too young to talk, were saved, and are now under the care of the Mormon Bishop at Cedar City; and that the Mormons obtained possession of all the property of those emigrants. Now, what can we expect, if a jury composed entirely of Mormons is entrusted with the solemn responsibility of inquiring into this deadful occurrence?

I cannot but believe that the Judge will decide that, as the Court derives its authority to act in any case from the United States, so, also, the officers of the Court appointed by the U. S. Government form a constituent part of it, and must act with it in every case legally before it.

Brigham still Stiff-necked and Rebellious.

Last Saturday, three unsuccessful attempts were made by Marshal Dotson and his deputies to serve a subpoena upon Brigham Young requiring his attendance before the Court as a witness. The first time the Marshal went to the house, he was told that Brigham was not at home; but the second and third times, the gates in the high stone wall which surrounds Brigham's house were shut in his face, and he was positively denied admittance, although he stated his business and demanded admittance in the name of the United States. It will now be necessary for the Court to issue an attachment requiring the Marshal to take Brigham's body, and compel his attendance before the Court; and if he still refuses to allow the Marshal to approach him, it will become necessary to call upon the Army for assistance....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, Sat., April 23, 1859.                                 No. 14.



The  Mountain  Meadows  Massacre --
A  Tale  of  Horror.

One of the dread mysteries of Mormondom which the United States Judges in Utah are endeavoring to unravel, greatly to the consternation of the "Saints," is the horrible massacre, at Mountain Meadows, of one hundred emigrants, on their way from Arkansas to California. At the time, we are told that the unfortunate victims fell under the weapons of the Canosh band of Paravant Indians; but various subsequent developments have established the conviction that these were merely tools in the hands of the Mormons themselves. An eye-witness of the transaction has been found, at last, and we have received from an official source at Salt Lake a statement of his account of the affair He says the massacre was designed and carried into execution for mere purposes of plunder, to get possession of the thirty wagons and seven or eight hundred head of cattle belonging to the emigrants. It will be remembered that our Salt Lake Correspondent, last summer, presented some evidence sustaining this view -- but still the subject was left partially in doubt. Now, the whole fearful truth stands revealed, presenting one of the most shocking cases of cruelty and crime that has ever stained the records of a civilized community. The witness says:

While I was residing at Cedar City, I was called upon by Messrs. Isaac Hight [sic - Haight?], John D. Lee, and John Higbee -- all three Mormon military officers -- to go a few miles out south of the city, which I did. There I found 30 or 40 others, selected from different settlements. We were addressed by the above officers, who told us that they had sent Canosh, the Paravant Chief, with his warriors, to destroy the Arkansas company, and that if he had not done it we must; and that if any of us refused or betrayed them to the Amercans, they would take good care of him hereafter. Here we were all ordered on the quick march to the Mountain Meadows, where we found the emigrants, with their wagons formed into two circles, with their families in the midst, trying to defend themselves against the merciless and blood-thirsty savages, who lay around in killing them as opportunity presented.

Hight and Lee formed their men into two companies, and made a precipitant rush at the poor defenseless victims. The men inside of the circles rose up, but instantly fell dead or mortally wounded, under the fire of the wretches who so cruelly sought their lives. Nothing remained to be done except to kill the frightened females and their innocent children clasped in their arms. Others clung with desperation to their bleeding, dying husbands, pleading in vain for mercy at the hands of the "Christians" who controlled the no more savage Indian assailants.

John D. Lee now sent to the Indian chief, and his men in ambush to come out and finish the survivors, directing him to spare only the little children, who could not talk. The savages came instantly, with knives drawn, and speedily finished the bloody work The scene beggars description, the demoniac yells of the savage monsters, mingled with the shrieks and prayers of helpless mothers and daughters, while the death-blows were dealt with unflinching hands, and scalps were torn from heads which bloomed with beauty and innocence but a few hours before. Now the work of butchering ended. The murderers threw the dead into two heaps, covered them slightly with earth, and left them, "to feed the wolves and birds of prey;" and returned home with their booty of cattle, and wagons, and a great quantity, of goods, etc.

The narrator of the above facts also furnishes the following statement of crimes within his knowledge. He says:

G. D. Potter, William Parrish, and Beetson Parrish, were all murdered on the road to Springville, in the month of March, 1857. All that is requisite to bring the murderers to justice, is a thorough investigation by the United States Court.

Henry Forbes came into Springville. last winter, from California, and put up with S. Terry, one of our bishop's policemen. A short time after he was missing, and has never returned. His horse, saddle and revolver were sold by Terry, and put to his own use.

[This case was mentioned by our Salt Lake correspondent last summer, but at that time the name of the missing man could not be ascertained. -- Ed. Bulletin.]

Criminal Blundering in Utah.

The future historian of our times will set down the Utah policy of President Buchanan as the most disgraceful budget of blunders from end to end. It the beginning, the force ordered to Mormondom was miserably inadequate to the purpose in hand; then it was put in motion so late in the season that it was necessarily caught in the mountains by snows of a severe winter, and compelled to go into quarters for the season a little over a hundred miles only from its destination. By this criminal mismanagement, months of valuable time were lost, the army was subjected to much deprivation and suffering, and the expenses of the Expedition were enhanced by many hundreds of thousands of dollars. The army complained not, however; nor would the country at large have grumbled at the expense, had the purpose been accomplished for which the troops were ordered upon the march across twelve hundred miles of dreary wilderness.

But that was not permitted to be. The President intruded an unmasked pardon upon the Mormon traitors, and thus lost the opportunity to break down and destroy the theocratic power of Brigham Young and his priesthood. A more serious error could not have been perpetrated. Young has maintained the influence over his people, through which he led them into overt acts of treason and actual rebellion, by inspiring them with the conviction that he wielded some supernatural or miraculous power, and that the Government was utterly unable to subdue them and subject him and his followers to the law. It was of the highest importance, therefore, that the folly of these pretensions should be exposed. To that end, no terms should have been made with traitors. The army should have marched into the valley of Salt Lake without conditions precedent, of any sort whatever. That policy would have scattered Brigham's power to the wind. The people would then have had practical demonstration of the fact that the Government of the United States is supreme and that the boastings and threatenings of their priestly leaders were utterly vain and groundless. It would have torn the veil from the eye of the masses, enabled them to see the pit of destruction towards which their feet were tending, and reestablished their loyalty to the Government.

On the other hand, the tender of full and free pardon, made prior to the entrance of the army, was claimed at once as a fulfillment of Brighamís prophecy to the effect that the army could never come into the Valley, except by his consent. It was held to be a suing by the Government for peace, and it acceptance was and is claimed as an act of grace on the part of the Mormons, rather than of the President! The effect is, that Brighamís power, instead of being crushed, is increased four-fold among his deluded followers, who, having got out of one scrape so easily, are more ready than ever to steep their hands in treason, or any other crime, whenever their prophet issues the order. This mistaken policy is costing the country millions per annum for the maintenance of a standing army in the heart of our Republic, to preserve peace ans sustain the laws!(sic) and the recent exciting events in Utah already indicate the exceeding danger that it will soon involve the cost of much human blood.

With an irresistible proclivity to do the wrong thing, the President also appointed a Governor for Utah, who bids fair to out-blunder even his chief. Governor Cumming has proved himself utterly unfit for the important position which he neither dignifies nor adorns. From the beginning he has constantly sided with the Mormons, and against the judicial and military officers in the Territory. His last and most flagrant outrage upon prudence and decency, was a proclamation protesting against the presence at Provo City of troops called out upon requisition of Judge Cradlebaugh. In a former article we have shown that the Judge had the right to call in the army to his aid. But even admitting that he was wrong in this, the Judge and General Johnston assumed responsibility for the act, pending a settlement of the disputed point by the Executive at Washington; and there the Governor should have let it rest. This would not suit him, however. Instead of acquiescing for the time, and setting an example of subordination and moderation, he proceeded to assure the Mormons that he had full control over the army under his instructions. True, he did not at once enter his protest against the employ of troops to protect Judge Cradlebaugh. He was more cunningly mischievous. He went to Provo, where he watched the proceedings of the Court several days. Finding the Judge determined to assert the supremacy of the law at all hazards, and not to permit packed juries to make the Court a laughing-stock, the Governor the assumed the prerogative of commander-in-chief of the army, and ordered away the troops by whose aid alone the Court was sustained! The Court seemed in a fair way to unveil some of the manifold iniquities perpetrated in the name of religion. The church leaders began to manifest alarm, and, as the Court progressed, scores of them took refuge in flight, having first demanded of the Governor, as a right, that he should fulfill his promises, and save them from the inconvenience of being compelled to answer for murders, robberies, and other heinous crimes committed in years gone by.

Of course, Cumming yielded, and by his public denunciation of the acts of Judge Cradlebaugh and Gen. Johnston as usurpation, is practically inviting the Mormons to treasonable resistance. We have in our possession several [affadvits] signed by respectable men, who swear that the effect of the Governor's proclamation was to exasperated the Mormons against the troops, to disturb the public peace and tranquility, and to provoke a conflict of arms between the two parties. One gentleman, a merchant, states that he has since been approached by numerous members of the Mormon church, who desired to purchased powder and lead, stating that they expected such a conflict, and wanted the means of maintaining it. If a bloody issue should be made upon the plains of Salt Lake, a fearful responsibility must rest upon the gray head of Governor Cumming, and upon the President who appointed and has sustained him.


Note: The anonymous narrator of the Bulletin's massacre account does not provide any special, unique details that might show that he was an eye-witness. No other account reliably links Chief Kanosh and his tribe to the event. This report appears to be a semi-fabrication, based primarily upon information already published by the popular press.


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sat., May 14, 1859.                            No. 133.



OUR  SALT LAKE  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Mormonism Breaking Up and the People Moving.

Great Salt Lake City, May 2, '59.    
...Mormondom is fast dividing against itself. Mormonism is passing through a severe -- and because of its baseness -- a destructive test. Mormons are having the film of superstition removed from off their mental vision, and the degrading dogmas of priestcraft laid bare. Old veterans in the church, who have followed it through weal and woe, are shaking their heads with knowing incredulity, converting their farms and other property into cash, and remark [indignantly?] that they know lands where timber grows taller...

Indian Troubles.

It is said that the Indians on the routes to California are very destitute, and even starving, consequently troublesome, and appropriating largely, stock and whatever else they can get by fair means or foul. So much are they so, that a large herd and early travelers have come to a permanent halt, and require strong guards, with fears of having to abandon the northern route. On the central, or present mail route, the Indian Agent, Jarvis, had eighteen animals stolen whilst among the tribes to locate a farm. The Mail company have also suffered from their depredations. Dr. Forney, the Indian Superintendent, is still among the extreme morthern tribes. Of his actions or success we know little, except that his men and interpreters have deserted him.

Judge Cradlebaugh's Movements.

Judge Cradlebaugh, with his duly-noted perseverence, intrepidity and desire to discharge his full duty, is on a tour of investigation into the Mountain Meadow massacre, through the lower country, the result of which will, we have every reason to believe, be more astounding and convincing against "this people" than aught we have yet heard. We wait its coming, when you shall have it....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Thurs., May 19, 1859.                            No. 138.



General Salt Lake News.

Genoa, May 18th, 1859.    
Dr. Forney, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, arrived at Fillmore on 27th April, with sixteen of the children, survivors of the Mountain Meadows massacre. He proposes to leave the children at the Spanish Fork Farm, until he can secure more comfortable quarters at or near Salt Lake City. Some of them have distinct recollection of the murder of their parents.

Dr. Forney reports Indians south quiet, and disposed to be peaceable.

Paymaster Prince and escort were reported to be a few miles south of Fillmore on the 29th....



Exciting News from Salt Lake.

By a telegraphic dispatch in another column, it will be seen that the Mormons are out at last in their true colors, and a collision between them and the United States troops, may at any moment be looked for. The exposures of their criminality, made by the investigations of Judge Cradlebaugh -- a full report of which has already appeared in our columns -- has at last placed them before the country in their proper light, and hypocrisy, no longer serving to cloak their diabolical acts, in the desperation of the moment, they seek to protect themselves from retributive justice, by force of arms. The day of punishment approaches rapidly, and blood will answer for blood ere long, from these murderous fanatics, who have dyed their hands so deeply, by the long list of brutal murders and other outrages which they have perpetrated. We hear, at last, that the inefficient Governor Cumming has, at least dared to issue a proclamation, commanding the rebellious fanatics and murderers to disperse. Had he have performed his duty when he first arrived at Salt Lake, justice would long ago have been satisfied and permanent peace and order restored to Utah. Whatever the future consequences may be, he must bear the burthen of having acted criminally wrong. The present outbreak will strike no one with surprise, for it is a result long to have been anticipated.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sun., May 22, 1859.                            No. 141.



OUR  SALT LAKE  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Great Salt Lake City, May 9th, 1859.    
The rumors of rebellious feeling in Utah, which we reported in our last, are fast assuming a definite shape, and perhaps were we indite our next, an outbreak and exposition of Mormonism as it is, will have taken place....

We have no news yet from Judge Cradlebaugh. All are on the qui vive to learn the result of his efforts. Dr. Forney, Superintendent of Indian affairs, has returned from the Siuth, and reports all the tribes in that direction as quiet and amicably disposed. Whilst away he gathered sixteen children, survivors of the Mountain Meadow massacre, among the settlements south, thirteen of whom he left safely on the Indian farm at Spanish Fork, and three he brought with him to the city. They are all represented as intelligent, and though quite young, vividly recollecting the horrid butchery which deprived them of their parents and kin. Verily, they stand a living appeal to American citizens for pity, and through their sympathies to the government, to speedily and unsparingly avenge their wrongs. Dr. Forney seems well convinced that there were but few Indians engaged in the murder, and there are now on the Santa Clara whites who boast of participation in the demonic outrage.

We are glad to see that California is viewing the Mormon question with a correct and justly frowning gaze. All we ask for Utah is justice!...


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sat., May 28, 1859.                            No. 147.



Arrival of the Salt Lake Mail.
______

...
Genoa, May 27, 1859.    
The Salt Lake mail arrived here last night at 9 o'clock -- eight days and ten hours from Salt Lake...

Kirk Anderson retires from the Valley Tan.

Col. Johnston offers military protection to persons emigrating to California by the central route, and those who desire to leave the Territory.

Gov. Cumming issued a proclamation on the 9th May, requiring those persons who had associated themselves in military organizations to disperse, and appointed John Key, the Mormon Marshal, to carry out his orders. His return to Gov. C. was that he could not find any persons in arms; that he only found some bodies of men engaged in hauling or hewing wood, having their usual weapons with them. This return did not disappoint any one, as it is what is to be expected from the appointment. It is well known that the Mormons are drilling in the mountains, and the passes to their retreats are carefully watched and guarded. Very serious trouble is anticipated.

The orphan children if the Mountain Meadow massacre are in Salt Lake City, under charge of George [sic - Jacob?] Forney, Indian Agent, preparatory to their being sent to the Eastern States.

There is a very large emigration now ready to leave Salt Lake City for California.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sun., May 29, 1859.                            No. 148.



Arrival of the Salt Lake Mail.
______

The Salt Lake mail, with dates to the 17th inst., arrived in this city last night. There being no express from Salt Lake our letters have come by mail...

MIGRATION TO CALIFORNIA. -- Gov. Cumming has published in the Salt Lake papers a note from Gen. Johnston, in which the latter says:

"If persons desirous of emigrating from this Territory would assemble at a given time and place, with their families, trains, stock, &c., complete protection, by a special escort, could be given them; and should I be notified by any considerable number, of such intention, I will furnish the force for their protection."

The Valley Tan of the 17th contains a call, inviting persons desirous of migrating to California, to meet at Uncle Billy Rogers' house, in Salt Lake City, on the 21st.

THE MOUNTAIN MEADOW ORPHANS. -- The orphans of the Mountain Meadow massacre are to be sent to Fort Smith, Arkansas. William H. Russell, on behalf of Russell, Majors & Wadell, has agreed to furnish for the purpose of transporting these children from Salt Lake to Leavenworth, free of charge, two covered wagons and twelve yoke of cattle, with the necessary gear, to be placed under the charge of one of the conductors of their caravan, who is directed to use especial care and diligence in the premises. The offer has been accepted, and the children were soon to start.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


SOUTHERN  VINEYARD.

Vol. III.                                 Los Angeles, Calif., May 30?, 1859.                                 No. 11?


 

The following is a list of the children saved from the massacre at the Mountain Meadows, Utah Territory, September 10th, 1857, and collected by Jacob Hamblin, at the request of Dr. Forney, Superintendent of Indian affairs:

First -- Boy named Calvin. Does not remember his surname; is between seven and eight years old; was near his mother when she was killed, and says he pulled arrows from her back until she was dead; does not know what became of his father. Calvin had two brothers, older than himself, named Henry and James, and three sisters, named Nancy, Mary and Martha. He was obtained by Mr. Hamlin from E. H. Groves, of Harmony. Groves says that he paid to the Indians for Calvin a horse worth $70. He charges for schooling and maintaining him, $75. John Calvin, the above named boy, assures me that he never lived among the Indians.

Second -- A girl obtained of Joseph Smith, of Cedar City, supposed to be two years old when bought of the Indians. Can get no information in relation to her parent's name; some of the other children saved from the massacre say her name is Demars. For the purchase of this child of the Indians, two blankets, worth $20; one gun, $20; and one shirt, $2, were said to have been paid; Smith charges for maintaining her $66, making in all $108.

Third -- A boy obtained of John M. Higby, of Cedar City, named Ambrose Myram Taget. Says that he had two brothers older than himself, and one younger. His father, mother, and two elder brothers were killed by the Indians; his younger brother was brought to Cedar City. Says he lived in Johnson county, but does not remember the State. It took one week to go to grandfather's and grandmother's, who are still living in the State. J. M. Higby said he purchased the boy from the Indians; paid one horse, $75; charges for schooling and maintaining him, forty weeks, $80.

Fourth -- One boy obtained from Elias Morris, of Cedar City, named William Taget, brother of Myram Taget. This boy was supposed to be two years old when John M. Higby says he purchased him from the Indians. He says that he gave one gun, worth $25; two blankets, $20; ammunition, $2; nursing child four months during sickness, $66; 6 months maintenance, $48; total, $150.

Fifth -- One girl, supposed to be four years old when obtained by John Morris, of Cedar City, from the Indians. The boy obtained of E. H. Groves says that she is his sister, and that her name if Mary. Morris says that he gave for her three blankets, $18; two hundred pounds of flour, $12; maintaining forty-four weeks, $66.

Sixth -- One girl obtained of Sam Jakes, of Cedar City; says her name is Prudence Angelina; had two brothers, John and Jesse, killed by the Indians; father's name was William; had an uncle Jesse. Jakes said he obtained this girl of the Indians by paying two blankets, $14; three shirts, $8; one hundred pounds of flour, $6; schooling said girl eleven weeks, $8.

Seventh -- One girl obtained of Charles Hopkins, of Cedar City; supposed to be three years old when obtained; says her name is Francis Harris or Horn; can get no information in relation to her family. Hopkins says that he paid to the Indians for this girl, one horse, $75; maintaining eleven months, $88.

Eighth -- One boy (infant) procured from David Williams, of Cedar City, who says that he gave to the Indians in exchange for said infant, one blanket, $10; for nursing and medical attendance, $96; maintenance, $44; total, $150.

Ninth -- One boy obtained of Wolliam C. Stewart, of Cedar City; supposed to be three years old when obtained; says his name is Elisha W. Huff. Stewart says he paid for this boy, one gun, $20; one blanket, $10; for board forty-three weeks, $64.50; total, $94.50.

Tenth -- One boy found at John D. Lee's, of Harmony; says his name is Charles Francher [sic], and is supposed to be six or seven years old. Lee says that he paid for this boy, one horse, valued at $60; maintaining and schooling, forty-one weeks, $85; total, $145.

Eleventh -- One girl found at John Wells', Tokerville; says her name is Sophronia Huff. Wells says that he went to the Mountain Meadows, and gave a gun and twp blankets, $40, for her; he charges for maintaining her forty-three weeks, at $1.50 per week, $64.50.

Twelfth -- One girl, named Betsy, who was left at Amos Thornton's, Painter Creek. No information obtained.

Thirteenth -- One infant child left at Berkbeck's, of Cedar City.

Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth -- Three sisters, who have remained at Jacob Hamlin's since the massacre; their names are Rebecca, Louisa and Sarah Dunlap.

Seventeenth -- One infant, who was about six weeks old when obtained; was found in Ingraham's, of Pocketville. No information.

In connection with the oldest children, they told me that none of them have ever lived with the Indians, and also that at the massacre there were about thorty or forty white persons present. They also told me that they were in the corral fighting, some said four and others six days, and that part of the time they had no water. They also told me that John D. Lee, Charles Shirts, Josiah Tate and David Tullis came in two wagons and got their fathers to go with them, and that they saw them when the Indians were killing them.   K.


Note: The date may be off by one day. Presumably the above information was extracted from the official correspondence of Jacob Forney, the Indian agent for Utah Territory, and Lieut. Kearny (probably a relative of Colonel Stephen W. Kearny) at some point assisted Forney in dealing with the survivor children. There is no evidence that the Mormons paid anything for the children, or that the children were ever in the custody of any Indians. Assuming that was the case, all of these claims were frauds against the U. S. Government and were punishable as federal felonies. Why supposedly religious people would commit such crimes (and that, in addition to their theft and distribution of property looted from the emigrant wagon train) remains to be explained.


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, Tues., May 31, 1859.                                 No. 46.



The  Mountain  Meadows  Massacre.
________

Surviving Children of the Murdered fix the Crime upon the Mormons.
________

We have received, from our Salt Lake correspondent, a copy of the following thrilling statement, made by John Lynch, who accompanied Dr. Forney, the Utah Superintendent of Indian Affairs, to Mountain Meadows, on his recent trip in search of the surviving children of the Mountain Meadows massacre. It is the clearest and most interesting narrative of facts, in connection with that terrible tragedy, which has yet been given:

About three months since, I started to go to Arizona. When I arrived at Nephi, I was overtaken by Dr. Forney, the Indian Superintendent, who was going to the Mountain Meadows for the thirteen surviving children of the Mountain Meadows massacre. He told me he was doubtful about the Mormons he had with him, and asked me if I would assist him in case they deserted him. My party consisted of twenty-five men. I told him I would do so, and would return with him to Camp Floyd myself, if he could get no other assistance. When the Doctor arrived at Beaver City, as was anticipated, the Mormons deserted without apprizing him of their intention -- supposing that he would be unable to go further in his unassisted condition. I found him about 11 o'clock at night guarding his mules -- told him to go to bed, and I would relieve him. I persuaded two of my party to assist me; and with their aid, drive his teams down to the Mountain Meadows, and gave up my intention of going further south. We pursued our course to Parrowan. In this place, which is inhabited almost entirely by English and Danes -- as are most of the southern settlements -- the greatest hostility was evinced towards us. The people would hold no communication with our party, and spoke in the most insulting terms of the Americans, as they designate all who are not Mormons.

We continued our journey to the Meadows, passing through Painter Creek and Cedar City. The scene of the massacre is a broad, level meadow encompassed by a chain of hills. Upon careful inquiry, we learn that the emigrants had been harrassed by bands of men, whom they supposed to be Indians, during their journey from Cedar City to the Meadows, and, at the latter place, made a corral of their wagons for defence. The corral was near a spring, which was the source of a small stream running through the plain. Words cannot describe the horrible picture which was here presented to us. Human skeletons, disjointed bones, ghastly skulls and the hair of women, were scattered in frightful profusion over a distance of two miles. Three mounds, partially exposing the remains of some of the murdered, indicated the careless attempt that had been made to bury the unfortunate victims. We remained two or three hours at the Meadows, and occupied ourselves in burying the uncovered remains of the massacred.

This done, we proceeded to the residence of the man Hamblin, a Mormon, in whose possession the children were. We found them in a most wretched condition, half starved, half naked, filthy, infested with vermin, and their eyes diseased from the cruel neglect to which they had been exposed. After three days at Santa Clara, where clothing was made for the children, we returned with Hamblin and ten of the children to Cedar City, there obtained two more, and another at Painter Creek. When we passed through Beaver City, some of the Mormon men hooted at the children, and called them the survivors of Sebastopol and Waterloo. Among the children are some who retain a very vivid impression of much connected with the massacre. A very intelligent little girl, named Becky Dunlap, pointed out to me at Santa Clara an Englishman named Tellus [sic - Tullis?], whom she says she saw murder her father. She also states that Hamblin's Indian boy killed her two sisters. Both she and a boy named Miram recognized dresses and a part of the jewelry belonging to their mothers, worn by the wives of John D. Lee, the Mormon Bishop of Harmony. The boy, Miram, also identified his father's oxen, which are now owned by Lee. The two oldest boys told me that after they had been fighting for eight days, during four of which they were in the corral, from whence the water had been cut off, Bishop Hight [sic - Haight?], of Cedar City, came into the corral, and told the emigrants that the Indians did not want anything but their cattle, and that if they would lay down their arms their lives would be spared. They did so, and started to go to Santa Clara, when they were attacked by a mixed party of whites and Indians, and all killed except the children. The boy, Miram stated, that after the massacre was over, he saw the Bishop of Coal Creek washing the paint from his face, which he had used to disguise himself as an Indian.

The man Hamblin seemed perfectly conversant with the circumstances of the massacre, and told me that at one time he had a good many of the cattle in his possession. A Mormon named Ira Hatch also told me that he found the only one man that escaped about one hundred miles from the Meadows, persuaded him to return with him, but when they had gone about 40 miles, the Indians murdered him in his presence.

There were 18 wagons, 820 head of cattle, and 143 persons in the train. It is supposed that there was also a great deal of money, as the Mormons say it was the richest train that ever crossed the plains. I believe Dr. Forney to be acquainted with all the circumstances I have narrated.


Note 1: See Lynch affidavit of July 27, 1859 as well as its abbreviated version. The San Francisco Bulletin's summary report was reprinted in various papers, including the Weekly Stockton Democrat of June 5, 1859. See also some similar recollections, published years later in the San Francisco Bulletin, of Mar. 24, 1877.

Note 2: Mr. Lynch's description of the children's condition, when first recovered from the Mormons, varies somewhat from that given by William H. Rogers, whose Feb. 1860 statement says: "These children were well with the exception of sore eyes, which they all had, and which prevailed at the time as an epidemic in the place..."


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sat., June 4, 1859.                            No. 154.



Removal of Judge Cradlebaugh.
______

The policy of the Administration, strange and unaccountable as it has been in other respects, is still more strange and unaccountable in the manner of its development in regard to Mormon affairs. It seems that the course pursued by Governor Cumming in throwing every possible obstacle in the way of a judicial investigation of the crimes of the Mormons, meets with the endorsement of the Administration; while Judge Cradlebaugh, because he has boldly and fearlessly pursued his strict line of duty, must be deposed. It would naturally be supposed that the murders and villainieswhich his investigations have unmasked, would be sufficient in themselves to call for the warmest support and endorsement of his official conduct from the Administration, but, strange to say, they weigh for nothing.

There is something fearful in this line of conduct on the part of the government of the United States; something that tells us that we have arrived at a strange period in our national progress, when murder, rapine, and robbery are boldly and defiantly sanctioned by the chief magistrate and his advisers. The affidavits which we published some weeks ago in our columns, formed a terrible tale of crime perpetrated by the Mormon leaders, an exposure of which could not have been arrived at, had it not been for the energetic course pursued by Judge Cradle baugh.

They completely established the charges that had been made against the Mormon community, and as we have seen, have driven these fanatical murderers to resort to actual force of arms to prevent themselves from being subjected to the process of the law. They have, in fact, arrayed themselves in open rebellion against the officers of the law, and will only have to hold their position until orders from Washington can be forwarded to Salt Lake, removing Judge Cradlebaugh and sustauning Governor Cumming, when they may again return to their houses, and defiantly stand forth in the light of day with all their bloody crimes upon their heads, enjoying the fostering protection of the Federal Government. Truly, it is a terrible as well as melancholy picture.

What does this mean? "Whither are we tending?" The Utah expedition has, from the time of its first arrival in the Valley of Salt Lake, through the unaccountable conduct of the Administration, reflected only black disgrace upon the whole country. The single result attained, through the assistance of the troops, by Judge Cradlebaugh, is the only thing thus far accomplished, that can possibly be considered as of real benefit to the whole country; and this act is now repudiated by the Administration. It is absolutely and undeniably monstrous.

That the Administration is determined that no jusicial investigation shall be had, in regard to the crimes perpetrated by the Mormons, is rendered certain, not only by the fact that Judge Cradlebaugh has been removed for having done his duty, but also, by the fact that the vacancy which will thereby be occasioned "is not to be filled up for the present." The Mountain Meadow massacre will, therefore, go unatoned for, with all the rest of the black crimes upon the catalogue, notwithstanding that ptoof has recently been brought to light, which puts the fact of Mormon complicity in the dreadful transaction beyond the possibility of a doubt. We have no heart to comment further upon the subject. Here stand the facts, and we leave them to the consideration of an enlightened public, asking, once again, "whither are we tending?"


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


WEEKLY  STOCKTON  DEMOCRAT.

Vol. ?                                 Stockton, Calif.,  June 5, 1859.                                 No. ?



THE  MOUNTAIN  MEADOW  MASSACRE
The Surviving Children.

________

(reprints article from San Francisco paper)




Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, Mon., June 6, 1859.                                 No. 51.



The  Mountain  Meadows  Massacre --
List of the Children Saved.

________

(From Our Own Correspondent.)
________

Los Angeles, May 30, 1859.    
Enclosed I send an advance proof-slip from the Los Angeles Vineyard containing a list and description of the children who survived the Mountain Meadows massacre, obtained from Lieut. Kearny. Lieut. Kearny arrived here from Utah but a short time before the stage passed, in which he took passage for San Francisco, so I did not see him. I send it, as it may be of use, if you should not get some information from Lieut. Kearny or his fellow travelers:

The following is a list of the children saved from the massacre at the Mountain Meadows, Utah Territory, September 10th, 1857, and collected by Jacob Hamlin [sic - Hamblin?], at the request of Dr. Forney, Superintendent of Indian affairs:

First -- Boy named Calvin. Does not remember his surname; is between seven and eight years old; was near his mother when she was killed, and says he pulled arrows from her back until she was dead; does not know what became of his father. Calvin had two brothers, older than himself, named Henry and James, and three sisters, named Nancy, Mary and Martha. He was obtained by Mr. Hamlin from E. H. Groves, of Harmony. Groves says that he paid to the Indians for Calvin a horse worth $70. He charges for schooling and maintaining him, $75. John Calvin, the above named boy, assures me that he never lived among the Indians.

Second -- A girl obtained of Joseph Smith, of Cedar City, supposed to be two years old when bought of the Indians. Can get no information in relation to her parent's name; some of the other children saved from the massacre say her name is Demars. For the purchase of this child of the Indians, two blankets, worth $20; one gun, $20; and one shirt, $2, were said to have been paid; Smith charges for maintaining her $66, making in all $108.

Third -- A boy obtained of John M. Higby, of Cedar City, named Ambrose Myram Taget. Says that he had two brothers older than himself, and one younger. His father, mother, and two elder brothers were killed by the Indians; his younger brother was brought to Cedar City. Says he lived in Johnson county, but does not remember the State. It took one week to go to grandfather's and grandmother's, who are still living in the State. J. M. Higby said he purchased the boy from the Indians; paid one horse, $75; charges for schooling and maintaining him, forty weeks, $80.

Fourth -- One boy obtained from Elias Morris, of Cedar City, named William Taget, brother of Myram Taget. This boy was supposed to be two years old when John M. Higby says he purchased him from the Indians. He says that he gave one gun, worth $25; two blankets, $20; ammunition, $2; nursing child four months during sickness, $66; 6 months maintenance, $48; total, $150.

Fifth -- One girl, supposed to be four years old when obtained by John Morris, of Cedar City, from the Indians. The boy obtained of E. H. Groves says that she is his sister, and that her name if Mary. Morris says that he gave for her three blankets, $18; two hundred pounds of flour, $12; maintaining forty-four weeks, $66.

Sixth -- One girl obtained of Sam Jakes, of Cedar City; says her name is Prudence Angelina; had two brothers, John and Jesse, killed by the Indians; father's name was William; had an uncle Jesse. Jakes said he obtained this girl of the Indians by paying two blankets, $14; three shirts, $8; one hundred pounds of flour, $6; schooling said girl eleven weeks, $8.

Seventh -- One girl obtained of Charles Hopkins, of Cedar City; supposed to be three years old when obtained; says her name is Francis Harris or Horn; can get no information in relation to her family. Hopkins says that he paid to the Indians for this girl, one horse, $75; maintaining eleven months, $88.

Eighth -- One boy (infant) procured from David Williams, of Cedar City, who says that he gave to the Indians in exchange for said infant, one blanket, $10; for nursing and medical attendance, $96; maintenance, $44; total, $150.

Ninth -- One boy obtained of Wolliam C. Stewart, of Cedar City; supposed to be three years old when obtained; says his name is Elisha W. Huff. Stewart says he paid for this boy, one gun, $20; one blanket, $10; for board forty-three weeks, $64.50; total, $94.50.

Tenth -- One boy found at John D. Lee's, of Harmony; says his name is Charles Francher [sic], and is supposed to be six or seven years old. Lee says that he paid for this boy, one horse, valued at $60; maintaining and schooling, forty-one weeks, $85; total, $145.

Eleventh -- One girl found at John Wells', Tokerville; says her name is Sophronia Huff. Wells says that he went to the Mountain Meadows, and gave a gun and twp blankets, $40, for her; he charges for maintaining her forty-three weeks, at $1.50 per week, $64.50.

Twelfth -- One girl, named Betsy, who was left at Amos Thornton's, Painter Creek. No information obtained.

Thirteenth -- One infant child left at Berkbeck's, of Cedar City.

Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth -- Three sisters, who have remained at Jacob Hamlin's since the massacre; their names are Rebecca, Louisa and Sarah Dunlap.

Seventeenth -- One infant, who was about six weeks old when obtained; was found in Ingraham's, of Pocketville. No information.

In connection with the oldest children, they told me that none of them have ever lived with the Indians, and also that at the massacre there were about thorty or forty white persons present. They also told me that they were in the corral fighting, some said four and others six days, and that part of the time they had no water. They also told me that John D. Lee, Charles Shirts, Josiah Tate and David Tullis came in two wagons and got their fathers to go with them, and that they saw them when the Indians were killing them.   K.



THE INDIANS IN SOUTHERN UTAH. -- Lieut. William Kearney of the 10th Infantry, who lately arrived at Los Angeles from Camp Floyd, supplies the Southern Vineyard with the following information:

The Indians in Utah Territory are perfectly quiet; but those on the Virgin, and in fact all the Indians south of the Utah line, are saucy and impudent. This is probably owing to their intercourse with the Mormons, between whom and the Indians there is believed to be a system of signs or passwords, by which the Indians are enabled to know at once whether a person is a Mormon or not.

In another column will be found some interesting information from Lieut. Kearny in regard to the children survivors of the Mountain Meadows massacre. This officer arrived in San Francisco yesterday morning by the Overland mail.


Note: Presumably the above information was extracted from the official correspondence of Jacob Forney, the Indian agent for Utah Territory, and Lieut. Kearny (probably a relative of Colonel Stephen W. Kearny) at some point assisted Forney in dealing with the survivor children. There is no evidence that the Mormons paid anything for the children, or that the children were ever in the custody of any Indians. Assuming that was the case, all of these claims were frauds against the U. S. Government and were punishable as federal felonies. Why supposedly religious people would commit such crimes (and that, in addition to their theft and distribution of property looted from the emigrant wagon train) remains to be explained.


 


WEEKLY  STOCKTON  DEMOCRAT.

Vol. ?                                 Stockton, Calif.,  June 12, 1859.                                 No. ?



THE  MOUNTAIN  MEADOW  MASSACRE.
________

(reprints article from San Francisco paper)




Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, Tues., June 14, 1859.                                 No. 58.



LATEST  STATE  OF  MATTERS  AT  SALT  LAKE  CITY.

A telegram in the morning papers, dated from Genoa, Carson valley, 13th June, says:

The Salt Lake mail arrived here about 11 P. M., on the 12 June. Report states that Judges Sinclair and Cradlebaugh have been removed; also Postmaster Morrel. Governor Cumming has been sustained by the Federal Government. Every thing is quiet at Salt Lake.

Kirk Anderson is on the eve of departure for the Atlantic States. The Valley Tan will be enlarged under the proprietorship of John Hartnett, Secretary of the Territory, who, in his salutatory says: "This is a position not desired by the present proprietor, for many reasons, nor is it his intention to continue the dictatorship of this paper any longer than he can help; but whilst under his control it will contain only expressions independent, fair and honorable.

The children of the Mountain Meadows massacre are still at Salt Lake City, in charge of Dr. Forney, Superintendant of Indian Affairs. They have not been sent East, on account of the bad condition of the roads. As soon as practicable, they will be sent forward....

Elder Joseph Bull arrived at Salt Lake on the 29th May, from San Francisco, via the Southern route. He says the routes most advantageous to shippers are those via Placerville and Big Trees. The route from Santa Clara to San Bernardino is represented as almost impassable. He reports the Indians on the Muddy inclined to be troublesome. He had three animals in his train stolen, which were recovered by paying a considerable sum for them.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, Fri., June 17, 1859.                                 No. 61.



Letter  from  Salt Lake City.
________

(From Our Own Correspondent.)
________

Great Salt Lake, June 1, 1859.    
The Revelation of More Mormon Horrors Impending.

Judge Cradlebaugh, the fearless, has just returned from his southren tour. In all the country over which he passed in the southern part of the Territory, he had received details of hideous crimes scarcely hinted at before. The graves of dozens, murdered for apostacy, or a few dollars, or because they knew too much for the good of their priestly leaders, were pointed out to him by those who knew personally of the dread mysteries clustering around those desert tombs. Even the massacre of still another train of emigrants, in the fall of 1856, was in part developed. This was known in the army, but not to the Judge, before he left on his journey. We had heard of it here, also, but could hardly bring our minds to realize that such atrocious crimes had been committed by one "civilized" community. The Mountain Meadows massacre, instead of standing the first and only occurrence of its kind, seems to have been in fact the culmination of wickedness, to which its Mormon perpetrators had become emboldened by previous successes. I understand that the Judge will send to Washington the record of his trip, and ask if nothing can or will be done by the Administration to bring justice upon these fiends in human shape....

How the "Apostates are Abused -- A Cry for Vengeance.

Under the pretext of debts due by these emigrants, they have been robbed by the Church of much of their property; and the Danites are attempting to steal the remainder. Every possible thing is seized upon to cripple them; and if an ox looks over the fence of a "faithful," it is declared a trespass and punished with a fine. These emigrants have let their tongues loose, at last, and now say they fear only white Indians. Some of those engaged in the Mountain Meadow massacre (there were few, very few, Indians -- and they confirm this) have been heard to say that, after killing the men, &c., Bishop Lee committed a nameless outrage upon a young girl, and then cut her throat. God, in His righteousness, will yet send a severe judgment upon this people, (I speak of the church members who cling to their wicked tenets,) and punish the leaders....

The Guilty Bishops coming back.

Everything in the Territory is quiet. The bishops and others who fled before Cradlebaugh's investigations, have generally returned to their homes, or do return nightly in women's clothes. Until some policy different from that heretofore pursued is commenced, there is no use in attempting to capture them. They are very defiant...

The Democracy and Mormon Iniquity.

Is the support and maintenance of the Mormon Theocracy in Utah, to be adopted as a tenet of faith by the "National Democratic" party? The course of the President in dealing with matters in the Salt Lake settlements, answers so far as it can, the query, in the affirmative. We find too, that some of the most devoted of the Administration organs at the East are taking their cue from Washington, and gradually coming out more and more emphatically in support of the suicidal policy of the President in this connection. Instead of stepping forward in bold and patriotic spirit, and sustaining the Federal judiciary in their efforts to expose unparalleled crimes, thay are insidiously discrediting those functionaries, in the presence of a community nearly every member of which is an enemy to the administration of law and to sound morality. Conscious that public sentiment would be startled by a bolder enunciation of their purposes, and promptly repudiate them, these journals mourn over the sad condition of affairs in Utah, and covertly argue that the Government can only settle the later troubles there, by removing the Judge, who -- against the influence and private interference of the Executive sworn to see the laws executed, and in the face of all efforts from the same quarter to deceive the public in relation to the true condition of affairs in Utah -- has dared to fulfill his sowrn duty.

They condemn the fearless Cradlebaugh for his energetic earnestness; accuse him of compromising his "dignity," and characterize his charge to the Grand Jury as an "unusual one," &c. Are these panderers to a weak and faithless Administration ignorant of the circumstances by which the Judge was surrounded? Do they know that these also were "unusual" and unparalleled in the history of modern civilization? Can they not see that no charge less direct and explicit would have met the case, and fasten upon a Mormon Grand Jury their responsibility before the world? Nothing less than the frank, fearless, specific enunciation of notorious facts to which the Judge directed [attention], could have forced upon the Jury the conviction that if they refused to do their duty and take cognizance of glaring crimes brought to their notice, the world would discover their perjury, and accept their silence as admission of guilt.

Judge Cradle baugh knew of the henious crimes by the score, committed within sight of his courthouse, which had long gone unpunished. He knew, as everybody else about him knew, that a jury -- selected by a Mormon County Court under a law passed by a Mormon Legislature, during its last session, for the express purpose of obstructing the impartial administration of justice -- were themselves parties to crimes needing investigation, or near relatives of those who were implicated. From the day on which the Army entered the Valley of Salt Lake, petition after petition was presented to General Johnson by the people, asking for protection and a vindication of their rights. It was his duty to aid in the execution of the law when called upon, and nobly did that gallant soldier and courteous gentleman fulfill his part. ...

When the Judge entered his court-room, there was, by his side, claiming his protection, many a helpless woman. There were mothers begging the protection of their children, and demanding the restitution of property of which they had been robbed. The property, necessary to their subsistence, was notoriously in the possession of the murderers of their husbands, sons or brothers -- murderers rolling in wealth, and using the very fruits of their villainy still further to oppress the innocent and helpless surviving victims of their horrible crimes. The Judge was surrounded also by witnesses of the Mountain Meadows massacre, trembling lest themselves also should fall under the assassin's knife for disclosing to the world the details of a transaction which, for brutality, is scarcely equalled even in the annals of savage life.... And yet we are told that the Judge, with all these facts before him, was bound to fold his hands in meek acquiescence in the "conciliatory" policy of Governor Cumming, refuse to hear the complaints of the suffering oppressed, and thus sustain the pampered, swaggering villains...

What say the leaders of our several political organizations? Are you prepared to assume position upon position so impostant -- and, if so, where are you to be found? Choose between Mr. Buchanan, with his Mormon sympathizers and assassins, on the one hand; and, upon the other, every consideration of the weak, helpless and oppressed, against the rich, powerful and insolent debauchees whose heels are upon their necks.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                               San Francisco, Friday, June 24, 1859.                                 No. 67.



Letter  from  Camp Floyd, U. T.
________

The Army and the People "Sold."
________

Camp Floyd, U. T., June 8, 1859.    
Editor of the Bulletin: -- The mail last night brought news that Russel, Major & Waddell have bought the army... The reason assigned for the sale of these old Mexico and Florida war bruisers os the continual danger, so long as they are public property, of their being instrumental in exposing to the honest heart and plain sagacity of the many-eyes Umcle, the real truth about Utah affairs. Ah! it will tell the story of the Mountain Meadows, which it will become acquainted with accidently. The story will reverberate all through the channels of Uncle Sam's being, and wring his tough heart, and make his blood boil, as hard as it can boil; for he will understand its pantomimic significance; he will read in the cold, studied teaching, by which it was perpetrated, the sentiment which ought to die, with its possessor, on the gallows: Endless -- and, under all circumstances, inveterate -- hostility to Gentiles, who possess what we desire. Their lives and their property being ours, and, in a horn. the Lord's."

The reason is a valid one. As fast as the facts which exist in Utah become obscured in the style that the Mountain Meadows tragedy is obscured in the letter of the Utah Superintendent of Indians, to the Deseret News, the army that belongs to the people of the United States will endeavor to dispel the illusion...
Andrew Jackson.    
Second Lieutenant, R. M. & W. Army.



Things at a Deadlock in Utah.

Our Salt Lake Correspondent sent us by the last mail copies of the interesting letters that follow, which were lately transmitted to President Buchanan by Judge Cradlebaugh. As they explain to some extent the reasons which influenced Judge C. in calling upon the army to enforce the process of his court, we deem it important that these documents shall be made public. The letters are as follows:

Judge Cradlebaugh to President Buchanan.

Great Salt Lake City, U. T. June 3, 1859.    
Hon. James Buchanan, President of the United States -- Sir: I herewith enclose to you a letter addressed to me by P. K. Dotson, Marshal for this Territory. This letter taken in connection with the papers already sent on to Washington, will serve to throw much light upon the condition of affairs in this Territory. In addition, allow me to say I have lately visited the southern settlement of this Territory, particularly the place where 119 emigrants were massacred, at the Mountain Meadows on the 10th of September, 1857. Eighty or more white men were engaged in that affair. Warrants are now in the hands of the Marshal for forty of them. The entire population within 150 miles of the Meadows does not exceed 1,100 -- with not more than 200 of an adult male population. About all of those engaged in committing that crime live within the limits I have stated and are connected with the remainder by Church ties, ("endowment oaths") and as relatives. So much of a church matter was this Mountain Meadow massacre, that much of the property was taken to the Tithing Office, and then sold out. I have made this statement to show you the impossibility of the Marshal serving writs with a civil posse, and also as reflecting on the possibility of administering the laws by jury trial. It may be said in regard to all the murders for which writs have been issued, that the perpetrators are men holding high civil and church offices; and the evidence shows that the crimes were comitted by "order of council."

It is much to be regretted that there is not more coincidence of views and harmony of action between the Judges and the Executive of Utah. Without such concert the laws can neither be effectively nor worthily administered. With such concert, the many atrocious crimes that have been committed could be reached; and although the perpetrators might not be punished, through action of the juries, yet something in the way of establishing the supremacy of the laws for the future might thereby be achieved. The immunity from punishment and criminals have enjoyed, and still enjoy, here, tends to stimulate and multiply offenders.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
John Cradlebaugh.    



Marshal Dotson to Judge Cradlebaugh.

Great Salt Lake City, U. T., June 3, 1859.    
To Hon. Judge Cradlebaugh -- Sir: I have received from you certain warrants of arrest against many persons in your Judicial District, charged with murder, including one against J. D. Lee, John M. Higbee, a bishop, Hoyte [sic - Haight?], his counsellor, and thirty-six others, for the murder of one hundred and nineteen men, women and children, at Mountain Meadows; also one against Porter Rockwell, John A. Wolf, President of Seventies, Jacob Bigler, a bishop, Samuel Pitchforth, President of the Seventies; Foote, Mayor of Nephi, and five others, for the murder of the Atkin brothers, and two others; one against Lewis Bunty, and three others, for stealing six mules, the property of the United States. I also have in my possession warrants against Aaron V. Johnston, a bishop; Snow, of Provo City, a President of the Church, and certain others, for the murder of the Parrishes; also a warrant against bishop Hancock, and others, for the murder of Jones and mother.

I regret to inform you, that it is not in my power to execute any of these processes. I have made repeated efforts, by the aid as well of the military as of a civil posse, to execute the warrants last alluded to, but without success. So great is the number of persons engaged in the commision of these crimes, and such the feeling of the Mormon Church and the community in their favor, that I cannot rely on a civil posse to aid me in arresting them...
I am, sir, respectfully, your obt. svet.,      
P. K. Dotson.    


Note: In his Feb. 7, 1863 address before the House of Representatives, John Cradlebaugh gave the following names as those against which he had "issued warrants" in connection with the 1857 massacre at Mountain Meadows: "Jacob [sic - Isaac?] Haight, President of the Cedar City Stake; Bishop John M. Higbee and Bishop John D. Lee; Columbus Freeman, William Slade, John Willis, William Riggs, _____ Ingram, Daniel McFarlan, William Stewart, Ira Allen and son, Thomas Cartwright, E. Welean, William Halley, Jabes Nomlen, John Mangum, James Price, John W. Adair, _____ Tyler, Joseph Smith, Samuel Pollock, John McFarlan, Nephi Johnson, _____ Thornton, Joel White, _____ Harrison, Charles Hopkins, Joseph Elang, Samuel Lewis, Sims Matheney, James Mangum, Harrison Pierce, Samuel Adair, F. C. McDulange, Wm. Bateman, Ezra Curtis, and Alexander Loveridge." See also Congressional Globe, 37th Congress, 3rd Session, 1863, Appendix, p. 123; as well as B. H. Roberts' Comprehensive History of the Church, Vol. 4, Chapter 40, footnote 18.


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Fri., June 24, 1859.                            No. 174.



OUR  SALT LAKE  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Great Salt Lake City, June 8, 1859.    
Travelers seem to look to and approach this city with a great deal of interest. The trip across the plains, formerly such a bug-bear, and attended with danger and denials without number, has of late become to those interested, a travel of pleasure. Already several individuals, led by speculative or curious motives, have come in from the East, and just now seems to be the period for the arrival of notables in the Plains post -- Great Salt Lake City. By yesterday's mail-coach from the East we had the return of the Hon. Bernhisel, Congressional delegate from this Territory, a man favorably yet little known for his Congressional career -- rather antiquated we should think for the age, and the rapid strides of the church whose followers he has represented at the National Capital. But as Br. Brigham has said, "If Br. Bernhisel can do no good, he can do us no harm." Our next notable subject is Horace Greeley, who is on the road hither and expected by the next coach. What his object in this trip is, time only will tell. Next in course will be the return to this city of Chief Justice Eckels, Capt. Radford, and the arrival of the newly appointed Indian Agent, who were traveling in company and reported at Fort Kearney three weeks since. also, the N. Y. Herald assures us, and it ought to know, "a special bearer of despatches from Washington with further and more full instructions to Gov. Cumming and Gen. Johnston."...

Judge Cradlebaugh has returned to our midst, with full data of the Mountain Meadow massacre, which he only witholds for the suitable time to reveal. Another child survivor of the said massacre has been secured by the shrewd and indefatigable efforts of Dr. Forney and his aids; while still another, older than any yet obtained, remains undiscovered, whom the Indians know, and promise to ferret out of alive. All things are working together for a full exposure of that horrid and wholesale murder.

The visible traces of the Mormon rebellion so recently rife in this locality, have passed away, whilst the consolation is common among them that their late demonstration awed and deterred the United States troops from a general descent upon their families, firesides and flocks....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sun., June 26, 1859.                            No. 176.



The Mountain Meadow Massacre.

The massacre of an entire emigrant train at the Mountain Meadows, so called, in Utah Territory, on the 10th of September, 1857, by the Indians and Mormons, will long be looked upon as one of the most cold-blooded and cruel atrocities that stain our country's annals. We can only hope that it may ever remain without a parallel, although the conduct of the Administration in refusing to bring the white murderers to punishment, places a repetetition of the tragedy within the list of reasonable probabilities at no distant day. The developments which have been made concerning Mormon complicity in other murders perpetrated in Utah Territory, horrible as they were to every mind not blinded with fanatical prejudice, were but tame compared to those which promise to be made in regard to the Mountain Meadow massacre/

Judge Cradlebaugh, in a letter from Salt Lake city addressed to the President, under date of June 3d, says:

"I have lately visited the southern settlement of this Territory, particularly the place where 119 emigrants were massacred at the Mountain Meadows on the 10th of September, 1857. Eighty or more white men were engaged in that affair. Warrants are now in the hands of the Marshal for forty of them. The entire population within 150 miles of the Meadows does not exceed 1,100 -- with not more than 200 of an adult male population. About all of those engaged in committing that crime live within the limits I have stated, and are connected with the remainder by church ties ('endowment oaths'), and as relatives. So much of a church matter was this Mountain Meadow massacre that much of the property was taken to the Tithing Office, and then sold out. I have made this statement to show you the impossibility of the Marshal serving writs with a civil posse: and also as reflecting upon the possibility of administering the law by jury trial. It may be said, in regard to all the murders for which writs have been issued, that the perpetrators are men holding high civil and church offices; and the evidence showing that the crimes were comitted by 'order of counsel."

Here we must assume one of two facts; either Judge Cradlebaugh is not to be believed, or else the charge of wholesale murder is nailed to the altars of the Mormon church, and its elders and members are the blackest-hearted gang of bloody murderers that ever disgraced the land we live in. We have no right to assume the non-reliability of Judge Cradlebaugh, because he bears, so far as we have any knowledge of the man, an unspotted reputation for truth and veracity; has sustained every allegation thus far made with proofs that have never been contested. Hence the other conclusion is the only one which is left for us to arrive at.

Summing up all the facts then, connected with this terrible transaction, we find that the Mormons, assisted by their Indian allies, on the 10th of September, 1857, massacured in cold blood, one hundred and nineteen men, women and children, at the Mountain Meadows. A United States Judge proceeds, in the performance of his duty to investigate the affair, and to bring the offenders to punishment; he procures testimony of such a character as to enable him to fix the charges against certain leaders in the bloody affair, and issues warrants of arrest for them to be brought before him. The officer, however, makes his return to the Judge in the following language:

"I regret to inform you that it is not in my power to execute any of these processes. I have made repeated efforts, by the aid as well of the military as of the civil posse, to execute the warrants last alluded to, but without success. So great is the number of persons engaged in the commission of these crimes, and such the feeling of the Mormon Church, and the community in their favor, that I cannot rely on a civil posse to aid me in arresting them."

"About the 1st of January last, holding a warrant issued by you for the arrest of bishop Hancock and others, and being fully satisfied that I could not execute the command of the writ, by any civil posse of that section of the Territory, I called on Governor Cumming to make a requisition on the commanding General of this Department for a small number of troops to assist as a posse. At the same time, I made my affidavit to the fact of my utter inability to execute the warrants without such military aid, which affidavit I left with the Governor. His Excellency, after considering the matter, finally refused to make the requisition. I therefore do not feel warranted in again troubling His Excellency with another application."


We see, therefore, an organized Court of the United States, holding session in Utah, and in possession of full proof of the Mormon complicity, in this tale of horror, but at the same time utterly powerless to bring the offenders to justice. First the officer of the Court cannot procure a civil posse to enable him to serve his processes, because the community from which such a posse should be drawn, is made up of accomplices to the crimes committed. Next, the assistance of the military, under Col. Johnston, cannot be obtained, because Gov. Cumming, acting as it has been proven, under advices from Washington, refuses to make the proper requisition. This amounts to proof positive that the Government of the United States, though fully cognizant of the fact that these horrible crimes have been committed by the Mormons, refuses to permit the perpetrators to be brought to justice, and even goes so far as to order the removal of a Judge, for having attempted to do his duty.

This is the policy of the Government, resorted to for the pacification of the Mormon question. The treasonable acts of the Mormon leaders have been fully pardoned, and now comes a federal parson for those other great crimes against the laws of God and man. What is this but granting a license to the whole Mormon community, to go on in their rebellion, murder, and roberry, under the guarantee of the General Government to hold them blameless, no matter to what extent they exercise the authority thus granted?

We have put this question before, upon more than one occasion, and have found none bold enough to attempt to answer it. But the issue cannot be passed over in silence. It forms, at present, the most important questions of all those which now agitate the nation, and the people must endorse the action of the givernment, or enter their solemn protest against this strange and unaccountable criminal conduct.


The above was written before the receipt of the decision of the Attorney-General, by the Overland Mail, yesterday. The decision only puts a blacker phase on the whole affair. The Government acknowledges its belief that the Mormons have been guilty of the crimes charged against them, but refuses to acknowledge the authority of the Judges to call the military to their aid, to enable them to bring the offenders to trial. And further, it is held that the military can only be called upon when every other course is exhausted, and then only by a requisition from Governor Cumming. Governor Cumming refuses to grant this requisition and is sustained in his decision by the Government, while the attempt is made to remove Judge Cradlebaugh.

What then does the whole amount to? Why, that the Government not only refuses to permit the numerous murderers to be brought to justice, but this too in the very face and eyes of the fact that it acknowledges its belief on their guilt. The only course left to be pursued, to remove the impression thus created in the public mind, concerning the policy of the Government in regard to Mormon atrocities, is to recall Governor Cumming at once, and place some one at the head of affairs in Utah who will act in cooperation with the judicial officers. So long as he is suffered to remain in Utah, and his official acts are endorsed by the Administration, so long will there be no reason to presume that the administration desires to bring these Mormon offenders to a just punishment.



Utah  Affairs.

WASHINGTON, June 1,    
Attorney General Black, under the instructions of the President, has replied to the joint letter of the Utah Judges on the subject of the military course, during the term recently held at Provo City. He says it is very probable that the Mormons have been guilty of crimes for which they deserve the severest punishment, and that ot is not intended by the Government to let any one escape against whom the proper proofs can be produced; and with that view the District Attorney has been instructed to use all possible dilligence in bringing crominals of every class and of all degrees to justice. But the usual and established modes of dealing with the public offenders must be exhausted before any others are allowed.

On the whole, the President is very decidedly of the opinion -- first, that the Governor of the Territory alone has the power to issue a requisition upon the Commanding General for the whole or part of the army; and second, that there is no apparent occasion for the presence of troops at Provo; third, that if a rescue of the prisoners in custody had been attempted, it was the duty of the Marshal and not of the Judge to summons the force which might be necessary to prevent it; fourth, that the troops ought not to have been sent to Provo without the concurrence of the Governor, or kept there against his remonstrance; fifth, that the disregard of these principles and rules of action has been in many ways extremely unfortunate.


Note: The LDS Journal History of the Church contents for June 3, 1859, contain typescripts, taken from entries in the LDS "Manuscript History of the Church," of the same date (pp. 474ff), which are substantially the same as the Cradlebaugh and Dotson letters quoted from above, published in full by the San Francisco Bulletin of June 24th.


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Sun., July 1, 1859.                            No. 181.



The Letter of Judge Black to
U.S. Judges Sinclair and Cradlebaugh.

We publish below, in full, the letter of the Attorney General to the Utah Judges, a synopsis of which appeared in our columns some days ago.

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE.    
May 17, 1859.      
Gentlemen: The President has received your joint letter on the subject of the military force with which the Court for the Second District of Utah was attended during the term recently held at Provo city. He has carefully considered it, as well as all other advices relating to the same affair, and he has directed me to give you his answer.

The condition of things in Utah made it extremely desirable that the Judges appointed for that Territory should confine themselves strictly within their own official sphere. The Government had a District Attorney, who was charged with the duties of a public accuser, and a Marshal, who was responsible for the arrest and safe-keeping of criminals. For the Judges there was nothing left except to hear patiently the causes brought before them, and to determine them impartially according to the evidence adduced on both sides. It did not seem either right or necessary to instruct you that these were to be the limits of your interference with the public affairs of the Territory; for the Executive never dictates to the Judicial department. The President is responsible only for the appointment of proper men. You were selected from a very large number of other persons who were willing to be employed on the same service, and the choice was grounded solely on your high character for learning, sound judgment, and integrity. It was natural, therefore, that the President should look upon the proceedings at Provo with a sincere desire to find you in all things blameless.

It seems that on the 6th of March last, Judge Cradlebaugh announced to the commanding officer of the military forces that on the 8th day of the same month he would begin a term of the District Court at Provo, and required a military guard for certain prisoners, to the number of six or eight, who were then in custody, and would be triable at Provo. The requisition mentions it as a probable fact that "a large band of organized thieves" would be arrested, but the troops were asked for without reference to them. Promptly responding to this call the commanding general sent up a company of infantry, who encamped at the Court House, and soon afterwards ten more companies made their appearance in sight, and remained there during the whole term of the Court. In the meantime, the Governor of the Territory, hearing of this military demonstration upon a town previously supposed to be altogether peaceful, appeared on the ground, made inquiries, and, seeing no necessity for the troops, but believing, on the contrary, that their presence was calculated to do harm, he requested them to be removed. The request was wholly disregarded.

The Governor is the supreme Executive of the Territory. He is responsible for the public peace. From the general law of the land, the nature of his office, and the instructions he received from the State Department, it ought to have been understood that he alone had power to issue a requisition for the movement of troops from one part of the Territory to another; that he alone could put the military forces of the Union and the people of the Territory into relations of general hostility with one another. The instructions given to the commanding General by the War Department are to the same effect. In that paper a "requisition" is not spoken of as a thing which anybody except the Governor can make. It is true that in one clause the General is told that if the Governor, the judges, or the Marshal shall find it necessary to summon directly a part of the troops to aid either in the performance of his duty, he (the General) is to see the summons promptly obeyed. This was manifestly intended to furnish the means of repelling an opposition which might be too strong for the civil posse, and too sudden to admit of a formal requisition by the governor upon the military commander. An officer finds himself resisted in the discharge of his duty, and he calls to his aid first the citizens, and, if they are not sufficient, the soldiers. This would be directly summoning a part of the troops.

A direct summons and a requisition are not convertible terms. The former signifies a mere verbal call upon either civilians or military men for force enough to put down a present opposition to a certain officer in the performance of a particular duty; and the call is to be always made by the officer who is himself opposed upon those persons who are with their own hands to furnish the aid. A requisition, on the other hand, is a solemn demand in writing made by the supreme civil magistrate upon the commander-in-chief of the military forces for the whole or part of the army to be used in a specified service. In a Territory like Utah, the person who exercises this last-mentioned power can make war and peace when he pleases, and holds in his hands the issues of life and death for thousands. Surely it was not intended to clothe each one of the Judges, as well as the Marshal and all his deputies, with this tremendous authority. Especially does this construction seem erroneous when we reflect that these different officers might make requisitions conflicting with one another, and all of them crossing the path of the Governor.

Besides, the matter upon which Judge Cradlebaugh's requisition bases itself was one with which the Judge had no sort of official connection. It was the duty the Marshal to see that the prisoners were safely kept and forthcoming at the proper time. For aught that appears, the Marshal wanted no troops to aid him, and had no desire to see himself displaced by a regiment of soldiers. He made no complaint of weakness, and uttered no call for assistance. Under such circumstances it was a mistake of the Judge to interfere with the business at all.

But, assuming the legal right of the judge to put the marshal's business into the hands of the army without the marshal's concurrence, and granting also that this might be done by means of a requisition, was there in this case any occasion for the exercise of such power? When we consider how essentially peaceable is the whole spirit of our judicial system, and how exclusively it aims to operate by moral force, or at most by the arm of civil power, it can hardly be denied that the employment of military troops about the courts should be avoided, as long as possible. Inter arma silent leges, says the maxim; and the converse of it ought to be equally true, that inter leges silent arma. The President has not found, either on the face of the requisition or in any other paper received by him, a statement of specific facts strong enough to make the presence of the troops seem necessary. Such necessity ought to have been perfectly plain before the measure was resorted to.

It is very probable that the Mormon inhabitants of Utah have been guilty of crimes for which they deserve the severest punishment. It is not intended by the Government to let any one escape against whom the proper proofs can be produced. With that view, the district attorney has been instructed to use all possible diligence in bringing criminals of every class and of all degrees to justice. We have the fullest confidence in the vigilance, fidelity and ability of that officer. If you shall be of opinion that his duty is not performed with sufficient energy, your statement to that effect will receive the prompt attention of the President.

It is very likely that public opinion in the Territory is frequently opposed to the conviction of parties who deserve punishment. It may be that extensive conspiracies are formed there to defeat justice. These are subjects upon which we, at this distance, can affirm or deny nothing. But, supposing your opinion upon them to be correct, every inhabitant of Utah must still be proceeded against in a regular, legal, and constitutional way. At all events, the usual and established modes of dealing with public offenders must be exhausted before we adopt any others.

On the whole, the President is very decidedly of opinion --

1. That the Governor of the Territory alone has power to issue a requisition upon the commanding-general for the whole or part of the army:

2. That there was no apparent occasion for the presence of the troops at Provo:

3. That if a rescue of the prisoners in custody had been attempted, it was the duty of the marshal, and not of the Judge, to summon the force which might be necessary to prevent it:

4. That the troops ought not to have been sent to Provo without the concurrence of the Governor, nor kept there against his remonstrance:

5. That the disregard of these principles and rules of action has been in many ways extremely unfortunate.   I am, very respectfully, yours, etc.,
J. S. BLACK.        
Hon. J. Cradlebaugh,
Hon. C. E. Sinclair,
  Associate Judges, Supreme Court, Utah.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Wed., July 13, 1859.                            No. 192.



OUR  SALT LAKE  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Great Salt Lake City, June 29, 1859.    
Army Movements: The recent and present movements of the army, or detachments thereof, have given rise to multifarious alarms and rumors among the residents of Zion. The emigrant escort, and the scouting party to the north, which we have already mentioned, together with the heavy battery commanded by Major Reynolds, now en route for Fort Vancouver, and three companies of dragoons, eastward bound, as an escort, have combined to perplex Mormon judgment and engender, as usual, false reports as to the designs of said movements.... The dragoons avove referred to go as far as Fort Kearney as an escort for the Mountain Meadow children and their attendants, which party left this place yesterday morning. Eighteen [sic - fifteen?] children thus go, loving human monuments of this bloodstained murderous country and people. They go, seeking friends and relatives among the older States and communities of this republic. And shall their search -- their appeal be in vain? Shall Arkansas, to whose manor they were born, be the only sovereign to succor and give them aid? Ah no! But let the whole Union lend a listening ear and a generous hand; let the united welkin ring, the legislative and congressional halls resound with their appeals for sympathy and redress; let great men and small men; the ever ready and powerful Press -- espouse their cause until the omnipotent vox populi demands a full reparation for thei wrongs!...

FROM  ANOTHER  CORRESPONDENT.
_____

Salt Lake City, U. T., June 29.    
The arrival of trains of emigrants from the East on their way to California, together with disappointed Pike's Peak adventurers, has a tendency to give this city a lively appearance. The tales of suffering and misery, as told by these passers-by, are truly heartrending.

Two companies of Dragoons, companies A and C, passed through yesterdat on their way to Fort Kearny; at Fort Bridger they will be joined by company F. A portion of the light battery encamped outside last evening, on their way to Fort Vancouver.

Fifteen of the children saved from the Mountain Meadow massacre are now en route eastward. Gen. Johnston, at the request of Dr. Forney, furnished them spring ambulences and two baggage wagons, with mules. The children are under the immediate care of four women; Mr. R. B. Jarvis, Indian Agent, accompanies them. Two of the oldest boys are detained here by order of the U. S. District Attorney....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Wed., July 20, 1859.                            No. 199.



Arrival of the Salt Lake Mail.

We have the Valley Tan to the 6th inst.

THE MOUNTAIN MEADOW ORPHANS. -- The Mountain Meadow orphans left Salt Lake on the 27th June. The first arrangement contemplated their transportation to the States with ox teams; but Gen. Johnston kindly furnished for their better accomodation three spring ambulences and one luggage wagon, with teams of six mules each.

These children have been in charge of Dr. Firney since last fall, and he has given his interested and personal supervision, in order that they might be properly and comfortably cared for. Dr. Forney has obtained the guardianship of these children.

There was a large amount of property in the possession of the party massacred at the Mountain Meadows, and the children have now an agent at Salt Lake city, who will undoubtedly use his best endeavors to recover the property of which they have been despoiled.

Some of the ladies who had been engaged to attend to these children had not been allowed to leave.

Affidavits were made against Mrs. Hardie, that she was about to leave with the intention of defrauding her creditors, or rather her creditor -- the "Perpetual Emigration Fund." The amount due was over $200. These debts to the P. E. Fund are like Sinbad's old man of the sea -- very difficult to be got rid of....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 


WEEKLY  STOCKTON  DEMOCRAT.

Vol. ?                                 Stockton, Calif.,  July 31, 1859.                                 No. ?



THE  MOUNTAIN  MEADOW  ORPHANS.
________

The Valley Tan (Salt Lake City) of the 29th says 18 little children, from 2 to 8 years old, the survivors of the Mountain Meadows massacre, left there recently for the States. The first arrangements contemplated their transportation to the States with ox teams; but Gen. Johnson kindly and promptly responded to a request from Dr. Forney and has furnished for their better accommodation, 3 spring-ambulances, and 1 baggage wagon, with teams of 6 mules each.

They were to travel with, and under the protection of, Captain R. Anderson, 2d dragoon, who is en route to Fort Kearney with his command.

Mrs. Worley, Mrs. Nash and 2 other ladies have been engaged as matrons to attend to the wants of the little ones, and 3 men also accompany the party as camp assistants.

The names of the children so far as can be learned, are as follows:

John Calvin, Lewis and Mary Sorel (their father being held in remembrance as Joe Sorel).

Ambrose Miram and William Taggett.

Frances Horn.

-Charles and Annie Francher.

Betsey and Jane Baker.

Rebecca, Louisa and Sarah Dunlap.

Sophronia or Mary and Ephraim W. Huff.

Angeline and Annie (surname unknown).

and a little boy of whom there is no account, the people with whom he was found calling him William

The children are supposed to have resided in the same neighborhood and in Johnston county, Arkansas.

There was a large amount of property in the possession of the party massacred at the Mountain Meadows, and the children have now an agent here, who will undoubtedly use his best endeavors to recover the property which they have been despoiled.

The same paper of the 6th July says: 2 of the boys, the oldest and most intelligent of the survivors of the Mountain Meadow massacre, have been kept here, in case their evidence should be needed in the endeavors to ferret out the actors in that tragedy.

We omitted in our last to state that Major Whiting had consented to take the immediate charge of the children. sent to the States.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, July 16, 1859.                                 No. 85.



Arrival of the Salt Lake Mail at Genoa.
______

Salt Lake and Carson Valley News.
______

Genoa, July 15, 1859.    
The Salt Lake mail arrived... The Fourth of July was celebrated at Salt Lake City. Everything passed off in a becoming manner. The horses attached to one cannon ran away, seriously injuring three persons.

Two of the eldest boys, survivors of the Mountain Meadows massacre, were detained at Camp Floyd, in case their evidences should be needed to ferret out the actors of the tragedy....

The work of extending the telegraph line towards Salt Lake has been actively commenced. An office will be opened at Carson City in a few days.

Emigration has fairly begun. Our town was thronged with wagins to-day.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, August 13, 1859.                                 No. 109.


 

GREAT SALT LAKE, August 3, 1859.    
You will receive from a correspondent at Camp Floyd, I understand, the principal items of news from this neughborhood, to which I add the following...

The surviving children of the Mountain Meadows massacre have started upon their journey to the East. The following order, issued from the headquarters of the army provides for their safe escort:

HEAD-QUARTERS DARTMENT OF UTAH,    
Camp Floyd, U. T., June 22, 1859.      

(Special Orders, No. 50,) (extract.)

I. In pursuance of General Orders No. 2, of the 16th ultimo, from the Head Quarters of the Army, Light Company C, 3d Artillery, and Companies A, C and F, 2d Dragoons, will be relieved from duty in this Department, and will proceed to their respective posts in the Department of Oregon and the Department of the West. * * *

III. Company F, 2d Dragoons, is assigned to Fort Laramie; Companies A and C to Fort Kearny.

Companies A and C will march from Camp Floyd on the 26th instant. Company F, at Fort Bridger, will march one day after the other companies pass that post, and will keep that interval between them. * * *

To this command is entrusted the safety of the orphan children from massacre in the Mountain Meadow valley, in this territory; and, also, the reclaimed childern of Mrs. Ferguson, widow of the late Daniel Foster, of Conneticut. To these infant wards of our country, the command will render every proper assistance asked for by the person charged with attending to their comfort.

On arriving at Fort Laramie, the most efficient Company of the two assigned to Fort Kearney will, if not restricted by modifying orders, proceed to execute the duty specified in section 6, paragraph 1, of General Orders, No. 2, from the Head Quarters of the Army.

The other Company escorting the parties entrusted to the two, will continue to Fort Kearney, where a new escort to Fort Leavenworth will be provided.

IV. At the request of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Territory of Utah, Bvt. Maj. Dan'l Whiting, 7th infantry, will supervise the cars of the parties of children now being restored by the Government to their friends and relatives and will carry out, on the road, and at Leavenworth, the wishes of the Superintendent. The Foster children, under the immediate charge of Ordnance Sergeant Black, will be delivered to the Depot Quartermaster at Fort Leavenworth, who, before their arrival, will receive from the Secretary of War, instructions in regard to forwarding them to their mother. * * *

By order of Bv't Brig'r Gen'l A. S. Johnston.
                             F. J. Porter, Asst. Adj. General.

Capt. Simpson was expected in camp on the 2d, with the report of his new road to California, which shortens by a long distance the road between here and your State.

It is rumored that Marshal Dotson has sent his resignation to Washington. He has contemplated this step, but I do not think has yet decided upon it.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, August 25, 1859.                                 No. 119.



Revelation of Affairs in Mormondom.
_____

The Mountain Meadow Massacre and Mormon Agency.
_____

Mr. James Lynch, lately Wagon-master in the service of the U.S. Government in Utah Territory -- from whom we derived much interesting information as to the latest state of affairs there, published in our issue of yesterday -- has laid before us a statement by himself as to certain circumstances connected with the never-to-be-forgotten Mountain Meadow massacre, and the part which Mormon agency played in that terrible deed, and subsequently thereto. Mr. Lynch made oath to the truth of this statement in Cedar county, U. T., on 27th July last, before Judge Eckels, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Utah. Two persons named in the statement, Thomas Dunn and John Lofink, likewise made oath at the same time, before Judge Eckles, to the facts narrated by Lynch, so far as they were personally aware of them. The sworn statement of these parties had been forwarded to President Buchanan. It reads as follows:

UTAH TERRITORY, Cedar County.    
James Lynch, of lawful age, being first duly sworn, states on oath: That he was one of the party who accompanied Dr. Jacob Forney, Superintendent of Indian affairs, in an expedition to the Mountain Meadow, Santa Clara, etc., in the months of March and April last, when we received seventeen children, sole survivors of the wholesale massacre perpetrated at the former place in the month of September 1857. The children when we first saw them, were in a most wretched and deplorable condition -- with little or no clothing, covered with filth and dirt. They presented a sight heart rending and miserable in the extreme.

The scene of the fearful murder still bears evidence of the atrocious crime, charged by the Mormons and their friends to have been perpetrated by Indians, but really by Mormons disguised as Indians, who, in their headlong zeal, bigotry and fanaticism, deemed this a favorable opportunity of at once wreaking their vengeance on the hated people of Arkansas, and of making another of these iniquitious "Blood offerings" to God, so often recommended by Brigham Young and their other leaders. For more than two square miles, the ground is strewn with the skulls, bones and other remains of the victims. In places water has washed many of these remains together, forming little mounds -- raising monuments, as it were, to the cruelty of man to his fellow man. Here and there may be found the remains of an innocent infant beside those of some fond, devoted mother, ruthlessly slain by men worse than demons; their bones lie bleaching in the noon-day sun, a mute but eloquent appeal to a just but offended God for vengeance. I have witnessed many harrowing sights on the fields of battle, but never did my heart thrill with such horrible emotions as when standing on that silent plain contemplating the remains of the innocent victims of Mormon avarice, fanaticism and cruelty. Many of these remains are now in possession of Mr. Rogers, a gentleman who accompanied us on the expedition. Why were not these remains interred, if not in a Christian-like and proper manner, at least covered from the sight? But no! the hatred of their murderers extended to them after death. There they lay, a prey to the famished wolves that run howling over the desolate plains to the unlooked-for feast -- food for the croaking ravens that through the tainted air with swift wing wended their way to revel in their banquet of blood.

I enquired of Jacob Hamblin, who is a high Church dignitary, why these remains were not buried at some time subsequent to the murder? He said that the bodies were so much decomposed that it was impossible to inter them. No longer let us boast of our citizenship, freedom or civilization. Here were one hundred and forty poor, harmless emigrants to California butchered in cold blood, by white men, too, with attending circumstances far exceeding anything in cruelty that we have ever heard of or read of being perpetrated by savages. It is now high time that the actors and perpetrators of this dreadful crime should be brought to condign punishment. For years the Mormons have possessed an immunity from punishment, or a sort of privilege for committing crimes of this nature; but soon, it is to be hoped, a new state of things must dawn -- a retribution must come, vengeance must be had -- civilization, humanity and Christianity call for it, and the American people must have it. Blood may be shed, difficulties may be encountered, but just as sure as there is a sun at noon-day, retribution will yet overtake the guilty wretches, their aiders, abettors, whether open or hidden under disguise of Government employment.

John D. Lee, a Mormon President, has knowledge of the whereabouts of much of the property taken from these ill-fated emigrants, and, if I am not misinformed, in possession of a large quantity of it. Why not make him disgorge this illgotten plunder, and disclose the amount escheated to, and sold out by the Mormon Church, as its share of the blood of helpless victims? When he enters into a league with hell and covenants with death, he should not be allowed to make feasts and entertain Government officials at his table, as he did Dr. Jacob Forney, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, while the rest of his party refused in his hearing, and that of Lee, to share the hospitalities of this notorious murderer, this scourge of the desert. This man Lee does not deny, but admits, that he was present at the massacre, but pretends that he was there to prevent bloodshed. But positive evidences implicate him as the leader of the murderers, too deeply for denial. The children point him out as one of them that did the bloody work. He and other white men had these children, and they never were in the hands of the Indians, but in those that murdered them; and Jacob Hamblin and Jacob Forney know it. The children pointed out to us the dresses and jewelry of their mothers and sisters, that now grace the Angelic forms of these murderers' women and children. Verily, it would seem that men and women alike combined in this wholesale slaughter.

This ill-fated train consisted of 18 wagons, [820] head of cattle, household goods to a large amount, besides money estimated at $80,000 or $90,000, the greater part of which, it is believed, now make rich the harems of John D. Lee. Of this train, a man whose name is unknown fortunately escaped at the time of the massacre to Vegas, 100 miles distant from the scene of blood, on the California Road. Here he was followed by five mormons, who, through promises of safety &c., prevailed upon him to begin his return to Mountain Meadows, and, contrary to their promises, and his just expectations, they inhumanly butchered him -- laughing at, and disregarding his loud and repeated cries for mercy, as witnessed and told by Ira Hatch, one of the five. The object in killing this man, was to leave no witness competent to give testimony in a court of justice, but God, whose ways are inscrutable, has thought proper, through the instrumentality of the "babes and sucklings" recovered by us, to bring to light this most horrible tragedy, and made know its barbarous and inhuman perpetrators. Already a step has been take by Judge Cradlebough in the right direction, of which we see evidence in the flight of presidents, bishops, and elders to the mountains, to escape the just penalty of the law for their crimes. If the vengeance of the Lord is slow, it is equally sure. The Mormons have reported that the principles, and in fact all the actors in this fearful massacre, were Indian savages, but subsequent events have thrown sufficient light upon this mystery to fix the foul blot indellibly on the Mormon escutcheon.

Many of the leaders are well known. John D. Lee was the Commander in Chief; President Height and Bishop Smith in Cedar City, and besides these, one hundred actors and accomplises, are know to Judge Cradlebough and Dr. Forney. Some of these implicated are and have been in the confidence and under employment of Superintendent of Indian Affairs -- Bishop Hamblin, for instance, who is employed by Dr. Forney among the Indians down South, who knows all the facts, but refuses to disclose them. Hamblin falsely reported to Dr. Forney that the children we brought away were recovered by him from persons who had bought them from Indians, and who knew that what he reported was false, and was so done to cheat the Government out of money to again reward the guilty wretches for their inhuman butcheries. It is pretended that this man is friendly towards the United States Government, yet is a well known fact that he screened some of these murderers about his house from justice, among whom are an Indian named George and a white man by the name of [Tillis], recognized by one of these children -- a little girl eight years old, who has been sent off to the States by Dr. Forney -- as the man who killed her mother. Hamblin cannot be a Mormon Bishop and a friend of the United States, at least where Mormons and Mormonism is concerned. His creed and oaths forbid it, and he could not if he would, with safety to himself, do it. Then why not out with him? Dr. Forney can find another and more trustworthy agent than he. Why, then, keep and patronize the abettor of a crime?

Before I close, my duty to my country calls upon me to state to the public the course of Dr. Forney to engender in the minds of the Mormons feelings of antipathy and opposition to the Judiciary, and the many obligations which he violated, and promises which he desregarded this trip.

I left Camp Floyd in March last, in charge of 39 men emigrating to Arizona. About the 27th of that month, we came up with Dr. Forney at Beaver city, who there informed me that he was en route to the scene of the Mountain Meadows massacre and Santa Clara, to procure evidence in relation thereto, and to secure the surviving children. He informed me that all his men had left him, being Mormons, and who, before leaving, had informed him (Forney) that if he went down south, the people down there would make a eunuch of him; and asked us for aid & assistance. I cheerfully placed the whole party at his command, telling him that he had started upon an errand of mercy, and it was strange that he should have employed Mormons -- the very confederates of these monsters who has so wantonly murdered unoffending emigrants -- to ferret out the guilty parties. He was left without a man, and we found him guarding his mules and wagons. He requested two of the men of my party (Thomas Dunn and John Lofink) to return to Great Salt Lake city with him, promising to give them employment during the following summer and the winter. They consented to abandon their trip to Arizona upon these terms, and returned with the Doctor; and, I am sorry to say, he violated his plighted faith and his solemn contract on reaching the city, by immediately discharging them without cause and hiring Mormons to take their place, as I am informed has been his custom since he came into the Valley.

I was with Dr. Forney from the time I joined him until he returned to the city of Salt Lake, having voluntarily abandoned my expedition to Arizona to aid his humane enterprise, and during the trip I repeatedly heard him tell the Mormons "that they need not fear Judge Cradlebaugh (whose disclosures and energy had created some alarm;) that he (Forney) would have him removed from office; that the Mormons (murderers and all) were all included in the President's proclamation and pardon, and would not be tried or punished for any offence whatever committed prior to the issuing of the pardon; that Judge Cradlebough was not a fit man for office" -- in fact, abusing and slandering the Judge in unmeasured terms -- no language being too low or filthy to apply to him. I could arrive at no other conclusion. from his conduct, than that the Doctor desired to influence the minds of the Mormons against the Judiciary, and that he cared more to create a prejudice against Judge Cradlebaugh's course in attempting to bring these murderers to light, than he did to elicit the truth relative to the murders; and that he was only following out his instructions from the general Government in going after the children, while he was availing himself of this journey to make a pilgrimage to the south settlements to abuse and traduce Judge Cradlebaugh, and arouse a feeling of resistance to his authority among the guilty murderers.

It is to be regretted that the Doctor has manifested so hostile a feeling to his associate Federal officers, and that the course of the Judges, especially that of Judge Cradlebaugh, has to be criticised by such a man as Jacob Forney -- a more veritable old granny than whom, in my opinion, never held an official position in this country; and in this opinion I am borne out by the concurrent opinions of nearly all the Gentile population in Utah who know him, as well as by many of the Mormon people.

I now reside in Cedar County U.T.
JAMES LYNCH.      
James Lynch being duly sworn, states on oath that all the material facts stated by him in the foregoing affidavit, so far as he states the same as of his own knowledge, are true, and so far as he states the same as from information derived from others; as also the conclusions drawn from the same he believes to be true, and further saith not.
JAMES LYNCH.      
Sworn and subscribed to before me July 27th 1859.
D.R. ECKLES.          
Chief Justice of Supreme Court.                  


Note: In the 1860 report of President Buchanan to the U.S. Senate, the following lines were appended to Mr. Lynch's affidavit: " The undermentioned state on oath that the foregoing affidavit had been carefully read to them that they are the identical persons named in it as having been employed by Dr. Jacob Forney to return with him to Salt Lake City -- that they went from Beaver City with said Forney South and back again and that we fully concur in the statements made by James Lynch Esqr. in the foregoing affidavit, as to what we saw and heard on the trip and the conduct of Dr. Forney Superintendent of Indian Affairs and further say not. -- (Signed) Thomas Dunn --(Signed) John Lofink. -- Subscribed & sworn to before me -- July 27th 1859. -- Signed. D.R. Eckels -- Chief Justice of Sup. Court." (p. 85).


 


SACRAMENTO  DAILY  UNION.

Vol. ?                                 Sacramento, September 1, 1859.                                 No. ?



FURTHER  FROM  SALT  LAKE.
________

We extract the following from the Camp Floyd correspondence of the Bulletin, under date of August 16th:

Captain Wallen, Lieutenants Sweitzer and Houston, and Dr. Randolph, all of Oregon and Salt Lake Wagon Road Expedition, arrived here last evening, all well. These officers accompany the advance of the expedition. The rest of the party will soon be in. Their camp is on Raft creek, a branch of Snake river; and their supplies are derived from this post.

The Indians are again becoming very troublesome, particularly upon the old Emigrant route via the Goose Creek Mountains and the Humboldt river, not much frequented by travelers to California. Several emigrants have been killed or wounded, and a good deal of their stock driven off. In consequence of the recent outrages, Lieutenants Gay and Ryan, in charge of a party of dragoons, were sent north to look after the knaves. They came upon the camp of the savages sonewhere near Box Elder (a Mormon settlement), the other night, where 200 of them were congregated and made a splendid dash at them, killing about twenty. The rest escaped in the mountains. The soldiers were only forty in number, and, unfortunately, were not strong enough to prevent the stampede of the enemy's animals which occurred. They, nevertheless, captured twenty of them, among which were ten fine American horses, which have undoubtedly been stolen from settlers or emigrant parties. Several of the soldiers were wounded, but not seriously.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. VIII.                                 San Francisco, September 17, 1859.                                 No. 139.



Affairs in Mormondom.
_____

The Judiciary vs. the Administration -- Mormon
Complicity in Recent Massacres.
_____

There seems to be a strong possibility of a judicial break-up in Utah. The powers and business of the Courts are virtually suspended. Judge Cradlebaugh has been legislated as nearly out of the State as it was possible to get him. The district assigned him by the Mormon Legislature, which has this power under the organic act, consists of Humboldt and two other counties, embracing Carson Valley. The Judge arrived in Sacramento on Monday last, bringing intelligence of the most anomalous state of things in Utah which ever existed in a civilized country. He will return to Carson early next month, and will open a term of his Court on the 10th of October. The business will not be heavy. Two murder cases are to be disposed of. The Judge received intelligence of one of these a few days ago, with a request to indicate what should be done with the survivor in the fray.

Judge Cradlebaugh and Judge Sinclair addressed to the President, about the middle of August, a representation by way of rejoinder to the letter of Attorney General Black, in which that official condemned their course and sustained the Governor. The whole correspondence will be called for by resilution in Congress, and will doubtless be published officially. It consists of three most important documents passing between the Bench of Utah and the Federal Executive, beside others relative to the military that have never been published, and which develop a serious conflict between the course taken by the Secretary of War and that ordered by the Attorney General.

Judge Cradlebaugh has excited the most rancorous hostility in Salt Lake by the success of his efforts to collect evidence in the murders and other crimes that have desolated the territory during the past three years. He has issued 75 warrants against persons accused of murder, of whose crimes, he believes, he has undoubted proofs. The Marshal has returned those warrants, with the endorsement that they cannot be served upon the persons against whom they are directed. The Judge has caused the Marshal to swear to that endorsement, and has himself countersigned it. Upon this return and statement he made a requisition upon Governor Cumming for military aid in serving the warrants. The Governor at first promised to grant the requisition, but the day before the departure of the Judge he recalled the promise, and refused to make any requisition upon Gen. Johnson.

There is proof, in Judge Cradlebaugh's opinion, that, at least, some white men, besides Indians, were engaged in the Mountain Meadow massacre, and forty of the warrants above referred to were directed against parties suspected of complicity in it. The requisite proof has been collected that the murder of the Aiken party that left California in the fall of 1857, was committed by Mormons, and by the express orders and directions of the Church. The Aiken company consisted of six persons, among whom there was $8,000 in specie. The emissaries of the Church, according to the proof procured by Judge Cradlebaugh, killed them all, and appropriated the money to the use of the Church. The evidence was obtained through a little girl who was present at meetings held by the bishops to determine on this important matter.

The Marshal of the Territory has resigned and will soon proceed to the States, by way of San Francisco. Judge Sinclair is also on his way out of the Territory, and will probably resign. The other Judges, Eckles and Cradlebaugh, will, it is believed, retire as soon as it is demonstrated that they are not to be sustained in the administration of the law.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Mon., October 3, 1859.                            No. 274.



OUR  ST. LOUIS  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

St. Louis, September 5, 1859.    
...

From the Rocky Mountains.

Capt. Wm. D. Wilkinson, of Perrysburgh, Ohio, has returned to Omaha from the mines. He went out in May and arrived on the 4th of July. He remained in the mountains about three weeks, leaving Denver, on his return, on the 28th of July, and arriving here on the 25th ult. He says the report was current when he left, brought in by the express, that an immense immigration was bound in, and so he kept an account of the teams met, which amounted in all to 61 of emigrants; 50 of Majors, Russell & Waddells, bound in with provisions; 19 of Col. Bent's with supplies for the Indians; 55 of Majors, Russell and Waddell for Utah, and 94 do., bound for Fort Laramie. On August 2d, he overtook, at the Upper California crossing, two companies of U.S. troops on their return from Salt Lake, which place they left June 26th, having in charge fifteen children, survivors of the Mountain Meadows massacre. The soldiers were bound for Fort Kearny....


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. IX.                                 San Francisco, October 17, 1859.                                 No. 26.



LETTER  FROM  UTAH  TERRITORY.
_____

(FROM  OUR  OWN  CORRESPONDENT.)
_____

CAMP FLOYD, U. T., October 17, 1859.      
I would refer the readers of the Bulletin to some statements made in my letter of the 5th instant, (See Bulletin of 28th October.) Since writing that letter, I have received from several sources information that completely confirms the fact mentioned by me, that the proposition to a Deputy Marshal (Mr. Rogers) was made by the Governor, to arrest certain parties accused of crime and to use the Danite band as a posse to aid him. This proposition, it is understood, was made by the Governor in consequence of instructions from Washington to bring the criminals to justice. The proposition was rejected, and the Governor has still to let his boast, that justice can be administered by the ordinary means at hand, stand on record, while innocent, good and brave citizens of the United States are murdered before his face by foreigners -- generally "refugees from justice."

It seems a little strange that the President should direct an examination (if he has so done) in these matters at this time -- after all the witnesses in one case have been removed by his authority to Arkansas, others scattered, others murdered, others concealed; and time given criminals to make away with the evidence of guilt pointed out by Attorney General Black in his letter to the District Attorney published to the world. This, too, just as Congress is about to meet. Is it for the purpose of saying that an examination is being made, and thus delay Congress acting on this question?

The Judges, writing to the President in reply to the strictures conveyed in the Attorney General's letter to them and to the District Attorney, say:

"In conclusion, we feel it our duty to protest against the action of the Attorney General, in promulgating to the people of this Territory these documents, so calculated to impair the influence and respect which the Judiciary ought here, above all other places, to exercise and maintain. * * * Although the letters of the Attorney General have received extensive circulation among the people of the United States, and are calculated to injure us in their estimation of our official action, we shall not, at this time, complicate these embarrassing difficulties by making public this communication."

A most injurious influence has been created by the publication of those letters, by indicating to this people that they have the sympathy and support of the Administration, and that others than Mormons here falsify facts. They are insolent and defiant in the extreme. Just at this time, while waiting for Col. Stambaugh to make his report and commit himself in their favor, they are peaceable, and as humble as Uriah Heap, and soft-sawder the old fellow sufficiently to blind him if he is willing....

The Mountaineer is out with another burst of "virtuous indignation," asking for what they do not wish if properly conducted, and the Examining Committee properly sustained by a protecting force -- an investigation. They howl at the idea of the army protecting any one in this country, because they know crimes will be brought to light and criminals punished under their assistance.

A stone monument, conical in form, and fifty feet in circumference and twelve feet in height, now marks the spot where rest the remains of those massacred at the Mountain Meadow, in Utah Territory. This is surmounted by a cross of red cedar, twelve feet in height, on the transom of which is carved the following inscription, visible to travelers:

VENGEANCE  IS  MINE:  I  WILL  REPAY,
SAITH  THE  LORD.

At the base of the monument stands a granite slab, into which are cut the following words:

HERE
120 Men. Women and children were massacred in
cold blood early in Septemver, 1857.
They were from Arkansas.

There it stands! A monument to the Administration, guilty of the weakness and folly of sacrificing their sense of justice to the vain hope of retaining power.


Note 1: The Salt Lake City Deseret News of Oct. 26, 1859 made passing mention of the Mountaineer's recent refutations of "a 'Danite band' at this late day," etc. -- but said nothing of any attempt by Gov. Cumming and the Buchanan Administration to whitewash responsibility for the Mountain Meadows massacre, with useless investigations, conducted in concert with known Mormon ruffians. It appears that such controversial material was reserved for the columns of the Salt Lake Mountaineer, (see Nov. 19, 1859, for example) and not generally reported by the News.

Note 2: The LDS Journal History of the Church's entries for Nov. 1 and Nov. 10, 1859 refer to the text of a letter of the former date, written by Elder James Lewis at Parowan, to Apostle George A. Smith, in which mention is made of the U.S. Government's intention, "to demand of Pres. Young the men engaged in the Mountain Meadows Massacre," etc. The Mormon response alludes to the idea that the Administration had replaced Brigham Young in his official duties before the time of the massacre, and therefore he had no responsibility in the matter. This particular investigation appears to have been suspended or terminated shortly after this time.


 



Vol. IX.                                 San Francisco, October 22, 1859.                                 No. 13.



Affairs in Mormondom.
_____

Horace Greeley's Views of Mormindom --
The Sham of "Popular Sovereignty" in Utah.
_____

Horace Greeley, writing to the New York Tribune, from Great Salt Lake City, thus reviews the evidence proving the complicity of Mormons in the Mountain Meadows massacre, and other crimes. He says:

Do I, then, discredit the tales of Mormon outrages and crime -- of the murder of the Parishes, the Mountain Meadows massacre, &c. -- wherewith the general ear has recently been shocked? No, I do not. Some of these have been fabricated by Gentile malice -- others are doubtless exaggerated -- but there is some basis of truth for the current Gentile conviction that Mormons have robbed, maimed, and even killed persons in this Territory, under circumstances which should subject the perpetrators to condign punishment, but that Mormon witnesses, grand jurors, petit jurors, and magistrates determinedly screen the guilty. I deeply regret the necessity of believing this; but the facts are incontestable. That a large party of emigrants -- not less than eighty -- from Arkansas to California, were foully massacred at Mountain Meadows, in September, 1857, more immediately by Indians, but under the direct inspiration and direction of the Mormon settlers in that vicinity -- to whom, and not to the savages, the emigrants had surrendered, after a siege, on the strength of assurances that their lives at least should be spared -- is established by evidence that cannot, I think, be invalidated -- the evidence of conscience-smitten partakers in the crime, both Indian and ex-Mormon, and of children of the slaughtered emigrants, who were spared as too young to be dangerous even as witnesses, and of whom the great majority have been sent down to the States as unable to give testimony; but two boys are retained here as witnesses, who distinctly remember that their parents surrendered to white men, and that these white men, at best, did not attempt to prevent their perfidious massacre. These children, moreover, were all found in the possession of Mormons -- not one of them in the hands of Indians; and, though the Mormons say they ransomed them from the hands of the Indians, the children deny it, saying that they never lived with nor were in the keeping of savages; and the Indians bear concurrent testimony.

So in the Parish case. The family had been Mormons, but had apostatized -- and undertook to return to the States. They were warned that they would be killed if they persisted in that resolution; they did persist, and were killed. Of course, nobody will ever be convicted of their murder; but those who warned them of the fate on which they were rushing know why they were killed, and could discover, if they would, who killed them.

The vital fact in the case is just this: the great mass of these people, as a body, mean to be honest, just, and humane; but they are, before and above all things else, Latter-day Saints, or Mormons. They devoutly believe that they are God's peculiar and especial people, doing His work, up-building His kingdom, and basking in the sunshine of His peculiar favor. Whoever obstructs or impedes them in this work, then, is God's enemy, who must be made to get out of the way of the establishment of Christ's kingdom on earth -- made to do so by lawful and peaceful means if possible, but by any means that may ultimately be found necessary. The Parishes were apostates; had they been allowed to pursue their journey to the States, they would have met many Saints coming up the road, whose minds they would have troubled if not poisoned; and they would have told stories after reaching their destination which would have deepened the general prejudice against the Saints; so the up-building and well-being of Christ's kingdom required that they should die. The Arkansas emigrants had in some way abused the Saints, or interposed obstacles to the progress of God's work, and they were consequently given over to destruction. * * * And I confidently predict that not one Mormon who has killed a Gentile or apostate under a like view of his duty will ever be fairly convicted in this Territory. No jury can be drawn here, unless in flagrant defiance of Territorial laws, which is not mainly composed of Mormons; and no such jury will convict a Mormon of crime for any act done in behalf of God's kingdom -- that is, of the Mormon Church.

I ask, then, the advocates of "popular sovereignty" in the Territories to say what they propose to do in the premises. How do they intend to adapt their principle to the existing state of facts? They have superseded Brigham Young, with a full knowledge that at least nine-tenths of the people of Utah earnestly desired his retention as Governor. They have sent hither a batch of Judges, who would like to earn their salaries; but the Mormon Legislature devotes its sessions principally to the work of crippling and fettering these Judges, so that they shall remain here as mere dummies or be driven into resignation. Their uries are all drawn for them by Mormon officials, under regulations which virtually exclude all but Mormons from each panel; it is a violation of all the laws of Utah to cite in argument before any Judge or jury here the decisions of any court -- even the Supreme Court of the United States -- but the courts of Utah; so that even the Dred Scott decision could not lawfully be cited here in a Fugitive Slave case; in short, the Federal Judiciary, the Federal Executive, and the Federal Army, as now existing in Utah, are three transparent shams -- three egregious farces; they are costing the Treasury very large sums to no purpose; and the sooner the Governor, Marshal, Judges, etc., resign, and the Army is withdrawn, the better for all but a handful of contractors.

"Popular sovereignty" has such full swing here that Brigham Young carries the Territory in his breeches pocket without a shadow of opposition; he governs without responsibility to either law or public opinion; for there is no real power here but that of "the Church," and he is practically the Church. The Church is rich, and is hourly increasing in wealth; the Church settles all civil controversies which elsewhere cause lawsuits; the Church spends little or nothing, yet rules everything; while the Federal Government, though spending two or three millions per annum here, and keeping up a fussy parade of authority, is powerless and despised. If, then, we are to have "Popular Sovereignty" in the Territories, let us have it pure and without shams. Let Brigham be reappointed Governor; withdraw the present Federal office-holders and the Army; open shorter and better roads to California through the country north of Bridger; and notify the emigrants that, if they choose to pass through Utah, they will do so at their own risk. Let the Mormons have the Territory to themselves -- it is worth very little to others; but reduce its area by cutting off Carson Valley on the one side, and making a Rocky Mountain Territory on the other, and then let them go on their way rejoicing. I believe this is not only by far the cheapest but the safest and best mode of dealing with the difficulties already developed and daily developing here, unless the notion of "Popular Sovereignty" in the Territories is to he utterly exploded and given up. "Popular Sovereignty" in a Territory is a contradiction in terms; but "Popular Sovereignty" in a Territory backed by a thousand sharp Federal bayonets and a battery of flying artillery, is too monstrous a futility, too transparent a swindle, to be much longer upheld or tolerated.


Note 1: See back files of the 1859 New York Tribune for further reporting on Greeley's trip through Utah, his interview with Brigham Young, etc. Some of his letters to that newspaper may be found in his 1860 book, An Overland Journey, from New York to San Francisco, in the Summer of 1859. See also the Tribune Almanac for the year 1859.

Note 2: The section of the original Tribune article, deleted from the above reprint, reads as follows: "The Arkansas emigrants slaughtered at Mountain-Meadows, had in some way abused the Saints, or interposed obstacles to the progress of God's work, and they were consequently given over to destruction. -- Far be it from me to hint that one-fifth, one-tenth, one-twentieth, of the Mormons ever bore any part in these bloody deeds, or even know to this day that they were perpetrated. The great body of the Saints undoubtingly believe all the current imputations of Mormon homicide and outrage to be abominable calumnies. Many of the highest dignitaries of the church may be included in this number. But there are men in the church who know that they are not calumnies -- who know that Gentiles and apostates have been killed for the church's and for Christ's sake, and who firmly believe that they ought to have been. I grieve to say it, but I hold these more consistent and logical Mormons than their innocent and unsuspicious brethren. For if I were a Latter-Day Saint, undoubtingly believing all opposers of the Mormon Church to be God's enemies, obnoxious to His wrath and curse, and powerfully obstructing the rescue of souls from eternal perdition and torture, I should be strongly impelled to help put those opposers of God's purposes out of the way of sending any more immortal souls to everlasting fire. I should feel it my duty so to act, as a lover of God and man."


 



Vol. IX.                                 San Francisco, October 27, 1859.                                 No. 17.



Letter from Salt Lake City.
_____

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
_____

GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, U. T.      
October 5, 1859.        
The Mormon Church "Organs." -- I have delayed writing for a mail or two... Since my last communication, the Mormon Church have started another organ in the Mountaineer, which differs slightly in its duties from the Deseret News, in having to perform the dirtiest work of the concern...

Judge Cradlebaugh was rebuked for attempting to administer the law when the criminals and witnesses were in possession of the U.S. Marshal. Will the Chief Justice be adminished for not administering it when the officers whom the President directed to be trusted, fled, taking with them the murderers entrusted to their care? Judge Cradlebaugh and his successor in the district, the Chief Justice, would have succeeded, had they been sustained, and would have made "this people" a law-abiding people, if that were possible. The Judiciary was crippled by the Administration, and was forced to adopt a partucular course -- which was known at the time would fail -- pointed out by Judge Black, who also indicated to the criminals the mode by which they might conceal the evidence of their guilt. Of course, no one will ever suppose there was a combination to sustain the Mormon Church, abet crime, and to shield and conceal criminals!...

"Causes of War."

In midsummer, as the tide of immigration reached the vicinity of Fort Hall, in Washington Territory, the "Indians" commenced their depredations; and, in one case, murdered some of the members of a train and brought their spoils to their usual market in Mormondom. Troops soon overtook and punished the offenders; but, because triumphant, and the effort of a Mormon guide to lead them into an ambuscade failed and was exposed, the Church "organs" howled, maligned the troops, and, ass usual, extended their sympathy to the criminals. Those Church organs will never forgive the Army for escorting and securing from depredation the apostates who left the Territory last spring, nor the exposure of the counterfeiting scheme. Some Mormons have acknowledged that members of their community were engaged in robbing the immigrants, and that the Mormons would retaliate upon Missourians the persecutions (?) inflicted upon them in past years. Thus, punishments brought upon themselves, in other States, by their own crimes, are made an excuse to rob and murder innocent people.

Newly Discovered Tribe of Indians.

Other outrages have lately been committed in the same vicinity, but, as yet, the troops have not succeeded in administering the punishment merited. In the first attack there is no doubt white men were engaged, but evidence shows that the late massacre was committed by a new tribe of Indians who "spoke good English to each other at all times, had long beards and light hair," and were painted. As, during our long residence in this country, we have not heard of any miraculous cures effected upon the hundreds, yea thousands of deformed cripples who came here to be made whole by the laying on of hands, and who now hover around this holy (?) city in the hope the blessed day is nigh when they will be made perfect, we cannot impute the above attributes of white men to to civilizing influence of brother Brigham upon the Indians.

The Mormons Entertain an Angel

Col. Stambaugh, Surveyor General of Utah, has arrived in this city, and is warmly received by the faithful. He is a warm personal and political friend of the President, and we look for something more in this appointment and visit than ascertaining the variation of the magnetic needle and the correctness of certain surveys. His ideas are said not to accord with the President's on Mormon affairs. Then, why should he have been sent here?...


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Thurs., October 27, 1859.                            No. 298.



OUR  SALT LAKE  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

Salt Lake, U. T., Oct. 5, 1859.    
...The Surveyor General has commenced his labors, and is reviewing the work of the late Surveyor General, Mr. Burr... No further news from the Indians. Dr. Forney, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, leaves for Washington on Friday next, so our Territory os now without a District Attorney, Secretary, Judge of the Third District, two Indian Agents and Superindendent of Indian Affairs, and the U.S. Marshal is soon to follow...


Note: The Alta California of Nov. 6th carried a brief mention of the "Departure of the Indian Agent," saying that Dr. Forney had left Salt Lake City "on the 15th" of October, "on business connected with his Department," and that he would "return again in the spring." Nithing was said about his taking with hom the last two remaining orphans from the Mountain Meadows massacre.


 



Vol. IX.                                 San Francisco, October 28, 1859.                                 No. 18.



The Mountain Meadows Massacre --
Affected Inquiry into It.

_____

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
_____

GREAT SALT LAKE CITY, U. T.      
October 5, 1859.        
The advent of Col. Stambaugh has not been signalized by any remarkable act till to-night, when the fact is developed that he brought instructions to Governor Cumming to investigate the massacre at the Mountain Meadows. This part of the white-washing -- perhaps, part of the combination -- to shield crime, &c., mentioned by me in previous letters. The Governor designated a young man from Virginia (Mr. Rogers) to act as Marshal to inquire into this foul deed. He (Mr. R.) inquired who were to be his companions to compose the "civil posse" and effect the arrest of the murderers, and to aid him in the investigation. In answer, he was given the names of Bill Hickman, Porter Rockwell, and other notorious "Destroying Angels." and he indignantly spurned the proposition; and till to-day no one suspected what was the matter. But to-day, Mr. Rogers left for Camp -- it is supposed, to aid in the white-washing mide adopted by the Administration -- and was followed by the Governor. Of course, the Chief Justice would be informed, as without his aid, all must fail. If he yields, he abandons his principles to the hope of advancement; but we do not believe such will be the case -- for, when Governor Cumming proposed to him to accept John Gray, Marshal of the Utah Territory, as the officer to arrest the Mountain Meadows murderers, he indignantly resented the proposition, and again expressed his disapprobation of it when the same was proposed by Gov. Cumming to Marshal Dotson. It is evident that Gov. Cumming's proposition and that of the Mormons, to have an investigation into this matter, is adopted by the President; and crime and criminals are to be shielded. Attorney General Black having first prepared the way for criminals to hide the means of detection, the Governor is evidently here to conceal the designs of the Government, and to work for the Administration. He plays the part that Pillow did against Gen. Scott -- a spy upon the acts of others.

Governor Cumming is not the proper person to examine such deeds. He who has made infamous propositions to the Judges and the Marshal, (the knowledge of which was conveyed to the President in due form, under the sanctity of an oath, and was in his possession at the time when he sent Col. Stambaugh here); he who has been an advocate of the Mormons, their shield, and willing tool of the Administration, should not be selected to investigate Mormon crimes, especially such as these. President Buchanan, in directing crimes to be investigated by others than officers of the law, interferes with the judiciary; and he does this, too, after he knows (because they had arrived when he gave the instructions) that the children who could identify the murderers had arrived at Leavenworth. If there is anything needed to convince the country of the criminality of the Administration, and its determination to cover and abet the crimes of the Mormon Church, it is this. Look at it: The President first orders these children to be sent home -- removed hence so as to be unable to give their testimony -- and then he rquires the Governor, who is inclined to whitewash everything, to investigate and furnish posse comitatus. The Governor, in turn, indicates members of the Danite band -- nen steeped in crime, and notoriously known to be so -- to aid the person selected.

Senator Johnston, of Arkansas, last year said on Congress (under authority of the Administration) that an investigation had been ordered into the Mountain Meadows Massacre, but he was not satisfied as to the investigation. No such investigation was ordered by the Government, though the Senator must have received such information from the Administration. The President directs all the willing witnesses to be sent to Arkansas. After they have gone there -- and the Judge who did examine into these matters had gone to Carson Valley, and is out of the way -- the President orders an investigation by one who has been a willing tool of his, and who has done more to shield crime and criminals than any one, except Brigham Young, in this Territory; and who, from his enmity to the Army, would shield the devil himself rather than have the Army position against the Mormons sustained and justified.

Judge Black pointed out the mode by which criminals could conceal the means of conviction. Governor Cumming makes infamous propositions to the Judges and Marshal. The President is aware of these when he orders Gov. Cumming to investigate; and that the witnesses were removed by authority of the President. The President sends a politician and a persinal friend to Utah to aid in whitewashing him and his policy! Was ever a more villainous scheme concocted to compound felony and screen felons from even the judgment of public sentiments?

The crimes of the Mormons require more thorough investigation than the President can secure except through the courts. The President interferes with the Judiciary, whose duty it is to inquire into crime. Besides, he is engaged in discrediting the Judiciary with a people who are proverbially disloyal. The Executive is proverbially Mormon! Thibk of it; a Mormon -- a confederate of robbers -- required to examine into Mormon crimes!

The President wishes to say to Congress -- "an examination is being made into murders," &c., here he wishes to stop onvestigation, if Congress desires one. Mormons are advising and controlling the President, through Kane. If pushed in this matter, the ruling party will fall. California, Oregon, Missiouri and Arkansas, and the New England and Middle States will repudiate any political party who sustain Mormonism practically, however much they denounce it theoretically.

Latest. -- My informant says that Gov. Cumming and Forney, (the Indian Superintendent) have misled the President, who has rapped Cumming over the knuckles and directed him to execute the law and bring the criminals to punishment, as he boasted he could. Hence the Givernor calls on the deputy to use Bill Hickman and his band! A pretty time, this, for the President to say that he has been misled, when he had facts enough presented to him months ago, time and again, to convince him. This is new dodge to shift the blame. He is trying to get out of it, and should not be trusted.


Notes: (forthcoming)


 



Vol. XI.                            San Francisco, Tues., December 27, 1859.                            No. 358.



OUR  ST. LOUIS  CORRESPONDENCE.
______

(BY OVERLAND MAIL.)

St. Louis, Dec. 5th, 1859.    
...

Arrival of Dr. Forney with the Survivors
of the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Dr. Forney, Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Utah Territory, arrived in St. Louis a day or two since, and proceeded at once to Washington. He is accompanied by the two lads -- John C. Sorrell and Myrom Taggett -- survivors of that horrible massacre at Mountain Meadows, the particulars of which the readers of the Alta are familiar. They are intelligent boys, aged respectively nine and ten years, and were retained at Salt Lake as witnesses against the Mormons who were arrested upon the charge of having shared in the dreadful atrocity.

The trial for which these boys are retained has not yet taken place, though Dr. Forney expresses the belief that the guilty parties will ere long be brought to justice. The names of witnesses and of persons known to be instigators of the revolting massacre have been furnished the Attorney General at Washington. Upon the arrival of the boys in this city, several gentlemen applied for permission to take them in charge and educate and protect them until they reached manhood, but all requests of this sort the Doctor was compelled to refuse.


Note: Dr. Forney's travels across the country with the two massacre survivors received far less press attention than had the earlier return of the fifteen younger children to the east. The New York Herald of Dec. 14th printed only a single sentence, in recognition of his arrival at Washington, "with the two children saved from the Indian massacre," a day or two previous.


 

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